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REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



FOR THE MUNICIPAL YEAE 



Commencing Monday, January Gth, 1873, and ending Monday, 

January 5th, 1874. 



BEING REPRINTS OE REPORTS AS PUBLISHED BY CONTRACT IN THE 
"BOSTON EVENING TRANSCRIPT." 



WITH A CLASSIFIED ALPHABETICAL INDEX, 

(Prepared dnder Supervision of the City Superintendent of Printing,) 



AND INTRODUCTORY NOTES. 




BOSTON : 

INTRODUCTORY PART FROM THE PRESS OF ROCKWELL & CHURCHILL, 

City Printers. 
Reprints of Reports from the Transcript Press. 



Introductory Note Explanatory of the Index Compilation. 



♦ ♦ * 



The compilation of the following Index was not commenced until after the close of the 
municipal year, when it should have been completed ; and has therefore been hastily pre- 
pared, while the binding has been detained for its insertion. 

In indexing the Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, the following topics have been 
omitted, either as not being essential in the Index, or as being better classified for reference 
in Department offices. References are appended in the list to sources of information. 

Standing Committees. See Pamphlet "Organization of City Government, 1873." 

City Officers. See Municipal Register, 1873. 

Police Officers and Special Police. See Police Department Records. 

Truant Officers. See School Department. 

Fire Department Officers and Members. See Department Report and Records. 

Jurors, list of and jurors drawn. See City Clerk's Lists. 

Constables and Constables' Bonds. See Citj'- Clerk's Lists. 

Streets, betterments assessed and abated. See Records of Street Commissioners. 

Sewers, assessments made, abated, and postponed. See Records of Sewer Department. 

Buildings, permits authorized. See Records of Inspector of Buildings. 

Public Buildings, use of granted. See Sup't Public Buildings. 

Taxes, assessed and abated. See Assessors. 

Streets, temporary closing, and removal of obstructions. See Sup't Streets. 

Claims, allowed, and leave to withdraw, unless subjects of discussion. See Clerk of Com- 
mittees. 

Auditor's Monthly Exhibits. See City Documents. 

Licenses to Auctioneers, Undertakers, Victuallers, Pawnbrokers, Newsboys, Bootblacks, and 
for Steam Engines and Boilers, Storage of Petroleum, Stables, Carriages, Wagons, 
Intelligence Offices, sale of Second-hand Articles, Billiard Halls, Exhibitions, etc. See 
Lists and Records of City Clerk. 

It is respectfully suggested to members of the City Government, and officers of Depart- 
ments using the Index, to apprise the Superintendent of Printing of such defects as they may 
discover, for noting and obviating in future compilations ; this Index being the first of its 
kind that has been put in print and bound with the volume indexed. 



Note relating to the City Publications. 



♦ » ♦ 



The Third Report of the Superintendent of Printing, (City Document 114, 1873,) contains 
a full explanatory list of the City Publications. The report is out of print in pamphlet form, 
but may be found in the bound volumes of 1873, vol. 4. 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS IN CONVENTION. 



ORGANIZATIOISr OF TflE CITY aOVERNMENT. 
January 6tli, 18T3. 

Prayer l)y Rev. James H. Means, 1 

Oaths of office administered to Hon. Henry L. Pierce, Mayor- 
elect, by Hon. Horace Gray, Associate Justice of the Su- 
preme Judicial Court, 1 

Oaths of office administered by Mayor to members-elect of each 
branch of City Council, 1 

Delivery of Mayor's Inaugural Address, 1 



Election and Qualification of City Clerk. 

Samuel F. McCleary elected, 2 

Oaths of office administered by Mayor, 2 



Election of Treasurf-r. 
Frederic U. Tracy elected, 224 



INDEX TO PEOCEEDINGS OF BOAED OF ALDERMEN. 



ORGANIZATION AND REGULAR MEETINGS. 

Board called to order by City Clerk, 1 

Convention for qualification of members of City Government, 1 
Leonard R. Cutler, elected chairman, 2 
Address of chairman, 2 

Notice to Common Council of organization of Board of Alder- 
men, 2 
Notice from Common Council of its organization, 2 
Convention for election of City Clerk, 2 
Mondays, 4 P. M., assigned for regular weekly meetings, 3 

ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 

Albany-street Freight Railway Company — 

Authorized to change position of turnout, 170 

Ordered to restrict use of steam, 190 
Annexation — 

Commissioners authorized to procure plans, and clerk hire, 
44 

Order in regard to annexation of Brookline, discussed and 
passed, 103 

Order passed for special city election on annexation of 
Brighton, Brookline, Charlestown, and West Roxbui-y, 
353 

Report of Commissioners received, 371 

Committee to examine returns, 409 

Report on returns of votes, 410 

Orders passed to petition for annexation of portion of Brook- 
line, 429 

Notice of petition for change of Brookline boundary, 441 

Notices of injunctions from Supreme Court, 465, 4b7 

Reports and order relative to Brookline, 483 

Brookline, parts of, discussion, 488 

Winthrop, notice of petition of, 501 

Report and order favoring annexation of Winthrop to Bos- 
ton, 548 

Winthrop, discussion on proposed annexation, and order in 
favor of, passed, 562 

Brookline, report and order relating to change of boundary, 
referred to next City Council, 564. 
Anniversary of great fire — Order passed, 459 

Discussion on observing, 465 
Annual reports — 

Superintendents and Boards authorized to present in print, 
10 
Appropriations — 

Auditor authorized to make required transfers, 57 

Discussion on order authorizing transfers, 57 

Established for 1873-4, 140 

Request for $25,000 additional for Public Buildings. 502 (see 
both columns, misprint.) 

Reports relative to exceeding appropriations, 515, 566. 



Appropriations — transfers authorized, viz. : — 
$5,000 from Pub. Lands to Printing, 57 
$5,500 from widening Tremont St. to City Hospital, 57 
$6,000 from widening streets to City Hospital, 57 
$30,000 froiTOi unexpended balances to Fire Dept., 116 
$11,000 •' '■ " " Water Works, 116 

$15,000 " " " " expenses Sc. Com., 116 

$12,000 " " " " School Instructors, 116 

$15,000 " " " " Public Library, 117 

$50,000from Atlantic Ave. to extension So. Market St., 133, 140 
$5,000 from unexpended balances to Overseers of Poor, 161 
$275,000 to Suffolk St. District, 180 

Appropriations — additional, viz. : — 

$5,100 for widening Federal St. Bridge, 231 

$3,000 for Hose house. Fourth St. go. Boston, 240 

$15,000 for Engine, and Hook & Ladder house Wash. Sq., 341 

$5,000 for Grammar school-house L. St.,'342 

$4,730 for Common and Pub. Grounds, 353 

$3,000 for Engine house, Wd. 14, 383 

$5,500 for Markets, 383 

$500 for Dover St. Bridge, 384 

$30,000 for Sewers, 459 

$1,100 for Washington Park, 501 

$1,000 for Quarantine Department, 502 

$12,000 to Common, 514 

$225 for watering streets, 514 

$11,650 requested for Public Library, 513 

$25,000 for Public Buildings, 533 

$10,000 for Suffolk St. Dist., 565 

$700 for Church St. Dist., 565 

$11,650 for Public Library, 566 

$500 for contingent expenses of Bd. of Aid. 567 

Armories — see Militia. 

Auditor of Accounts — Authorized to transfer funds, 34 
Estimates for 187.S-4 adopted, and tax laid, 140 
Order passed to print and distribute 5.000 copies of report, 197 
Schedule of City Leases, 206 
Annual report, 277 

Badges — 

City Messenger authorized to provide for Aldermen, 48 
Ballast Lighters ^ 

Weighers and Inspectors of, discussion on recommitting 
nominations, 116 

Quarterly report of Weighers and Inspectors, 149, 277, 398 
Baths — see Public Baths. 
Bigelow (Alderman) — remarks, viz. : on 

Normal School accommodations, 173 

Revision of City Charter, 422 

Sale of old Mather school-house, 429 

Soup for Poor, 538 
Board of Health — see Health. 
Bonds — see Loans. 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



Bonds of City officers — 

Committee for annual examination, 241 

Report of annual examination, 270 
Boston and Albany R. Co. — 

Notice of baggage sale, referred with full powers, 9 

Order passed for release of claims, 77 

Order of notice for hearing on land limits for Station, 493 

Hearing, and order passed granting location, 631 
Bridges — Granite, annual report of Siipt., 19 

Additional appropriation requested, 19 

Charles River and Warren, report on additional appropria- 
tion, 34 

Cambridge, report of commissioners, 40-41 

Broadway, order to provide new engines, 45 

Cragie's, order relating to widening, 56 

Chelsea St. — order passed providing for rebuilding of, 162 
" " rebuilding authorized, 201 

Meridian St., repairs and closure, 201 

Federal St., additional repairs authorized, 220 

Removal of foot bridges over B. &P. railroad authorized, 221 

Federal St., additional appropriations for, 231 

Broadway, expenditures for repairs, etc., 259 

Dover St., repairs authorized, 253 

Federal St., duplicate parts authorized, 309 

Mt. Washington Ave., repairs authorized, 430 

Eastern Ave., soundings authorized, to ascertain required 
foundations, 431 

Dartmouth St., rept. and orders to rebuild, 4.54 

Order passed to erect bridge at Dartmouth St. over Bost. & 
Providence Railroad, 467 

Dover St., order passed for additional repairs, 470 

Broadway Bridge, report of City Engineer, and discussion 
on rebuilding foundation, 481 

Eastern Ave., location approved, 493 

Broadway Bridge, orders passed to repair draw and rebuild 
foundations, 508 

Order piissed for City Engineer to prepare plans for foot 
bridge over Snmner St., E. B., 516 

Dartmouth St. Bridge, order passed for repairs, 516 

Broadway Bridge, order passed to rebuild draw, etc., 545 
Brown (Alderman) — remarks, viz. : on 

Refreshments, 44 

School Models at Vienna, 45 

Payment for work on small-pox hospital, 92, 181, 207 

Hiring Miss'y Building, Pemberton Sq., for city officers, 94 

Widening and Extension of Arch St., 112 

Widening of Wash. St., 120 

Tailing Parker Hill for reservoir, 128 

Widening of streets around new P. O., 134 

Normal School accommodations, 172 

Hiring portion of Mercantile whf. for additional market 
facilities, 191 

Fireworks and Ballooning 4th July, 218 

Widening of Water St., 222 

Halleck St. District. 271 

Renewal of market leases, 314 

Payment of salaries of Normal School, 315 

Placing Tobey's apparatus on City Hall, 315 

Sale of Mather School-house, 317 

Home for the Poor, 387 

Water from Sudbury river, 432 

Salaries of Fii'e Commissioners, 457 
Buildings — (see also Public Buildings — also Stables) — 

Order to consider best mode of placing water pipes, 33 

Annual report of Inspector, 72 

Order passed for examination of buildings to provide means 
of escape in case of fire, 115 

Order passed for removal of dangerous portion of building 
owned by Wm. S. Perry, 117 

Order for Inspector to employ clerical assistance, 162 

Order to sell building on lot corner of Warren and Quincy 
Sts. discussed, 181 

Discussion and non-concurrence on auction sale of building 
cor. Warren and Quincy Sts., 187 

Order for Com. to report action necessary to prevent com- 
bustible structures, 197 

Fort Hill occupants, report accepted, leave to withdraw on 
pet'n for release from rent, 209 

Order passed for erecting temporary building for fire engine 
on Burnt Dist., 233 

Order passed to print digest of laws and ordinances, 250 

Committee empowered to grant special permits, during re- 
cess of Common Council, 293 

Inspector requested to report cellars below 12 feet above 
mean low water, 309 

Communication from Inspector of, naming persons con- 
structing cellars below mean low water mark, 418 

Report and order passed relative to certain cellars below 
grade, 431 

Inspector of, appointed, 480, 491 

Inspector of, authorized to employ clerical assistance, 535 

Order passed to prevent projections over street lines, 635 

Rep't (no action necessary) on pet'n of Robert Treat Paine, 
Jr., for change in building ordinance, 566 
Burnt District Loan — see Loans. 

Carriage Hire — see Refreshments. 

Carney Hospital Fair — invitation accepted, 161 



Cemeteries — Cedar Grove, annual report of Commissioners, 8» 

Mt. Hope, deposits of money for care of lots, 170 

15th report of Trustees received, 230 

transfer of fence from Common, 341 

Census— Statistics of Boston, report of Ellis W. Morton, 173 
City Charter — Report and order passed for revision of, 230, 342 

Order for commission recommitted, 240 

Reports on revision, 384 

Report for revision of discussed and recommitted, 422 

Report on recommittal, order discussed and passed, for re- 
vision, 432 

Commissioners appointed for revising, 501 
City Clerk — Quarterly report of, 51, 186, 326, 501 

Complimentary order for vacation, and remarks on same, 211 

James M. Bugbee appointed /)ro tern., 288 
City Council — 

Reports of proceedings, order to advertise for proposals, 196 

Proceedings, order passed to bind, .575 
City Documents — 

Order passed to bind, and to pay City Messenger $150 for 
indexing, etc., 575 
City Engineer — annual report of, 63 

Order to survey Boston & Lowell R. R. Station, 76 

Remarks on taking Parker Hill for reservoir, 128 

on Water from Sudbury river, 432 

City Hall — see Public Buildings. 

City Hospital — Request for additional appropriation, 44 

Ordinance passed authorizing Trustees to make rules, 170 

Report of Trustees, 342 
City Registrar — quarterly report of, 40, 186, 311, 453 

Annual report of, 238 
City Scales — Haymarket Sq., quarterly report, 63, 311, 196, 467 
City Solicitor — see Law Department. 
City Surveyor — annual report of, 22 

Authorized to purchase supplies, etc., 272 
Claims — 

Order passed to pay Wm. Smith & Co., for work and 
materials for small-pox hospital, 13 

Order to pay Louis Frazier for personal injuries, 33 

Holohan &; Maguire, discussion and recommitment of petition 
to be paid tor work destroyed by fire, 91, 92, 93 

Smith & McGaragle, discussion and recommitment of petition 
to be paid for work destroyed by fire, 93, 94 

Mayor authorized to pay judgments of court, 103 

Burrill claim, non-concurrence, majority report giving leave 
to withdraw accepted, 140 

Smith & McGaragle, and Holohan & Maguire, on Swett St. 
Hospital, reports on recommitted, and opinion of City 
Solicitor, 18u 

Holohan & Maguire, further considered, 292 

Debate on payment of Smith & McGaragle and Holohan & 
Maguire, on Swett St. Hospital, 207 

Report from member of com. on payment of claim on Swett 
St. Hospital, 207 

Smith, Wm. & Co., transfer of insurance to, vetoed by 
Mayor, and discussion thereon, 249 

Smith Is; McGaragle, order discussed and passed relating to 
insurance, 250 

Order passed for Solicitor to enforce payment of insurance 
policies on Swett St. Hospital, 318 
Clark (Alderman) — remarks, viz.: on 

Health commissioners engagmg in other business, 7 

Order relating to small-pox hospitals, 11 

Precautions against fire in theatres, 13 

Use of warning cards or flags in small-pox cases, 13 

Opening Public Library on Sundays, 34 

Additional accommodations for public officers, 35 

Payment for laid for Swett St. Hospital, 46 

Refreshments and carriage hire, 42. 53, 54, 56 

Accommodations for city officers, 67-68 

Additional accommodations for public officers, 74, 94 

Payment for work on small-pox hospital, 91, 180, 208 

Annexation of Brookline, 103, ]04, 489 

Widening and extension of Arch St., Ill 

Widening of Washington St., 112 

Widening of Washington St., 118 

Taking Parker Hill for reservoir, 127 

Widening of streets around new P. O., 134 

Widening of Water St., 141, 160, 222 

Normal School accommodations, 153, 172 

Reduction of number of Truant officers, 171 

Limits of base ball grounds, 189 

Repairs of clock on County Jail, 191 

Hiring portion of Mercantile Wharf for additional market 
facilities, 191 

Concrete for Common, 197 

Erection of Grammar school-house, Dudley District, 1!)7 

Base ball playing, 199 

Removal offence on public grounds, 210 

Services of City Clerk, 211 

Fireworks and Ballooning, 4th July, 218 

Fence on Commonwealth Ave., 221 

Widening Washington St. between Summer and Essex, 231 

Locating steam fire engine in Parker St., 232 

Erecting temporary building for engine on Burnt Dls., 233 

Prohibiting sale of fireworks, 241 

Music on Common, 248, 272 

Veto of Insurance transfer to Wm. Smith & Co., 249 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



llecomniGiiclations in relation to Fire Dept., 251 

Purchase of fire apparatus, 261 

Jicmoval of sidewallv, adjacent to Common, 269 

Hallecli St. District, 270 

Tiircliasing liorse liose carriage for Engine No. 20, 278 

Filling So. Boston Flats. 278 

Widening of Trcmont St. 283 

Improvement of Sewers. 2S9 

I'ayment of salaries in Normal School, 300, 307, 315 

Authorizing com. on reorganization of Fire Dept. to visit 
other cities, 301 

Belling fence from Common, 309 

Sale of Mather School-house, 313, 430 

Plafing Tobey's apparatus on City Hall, 315 

Petition of Howe & French, 319 

Home for the Poor, 355, 387. 409, 519 

Site for small-pox hospital, 368 

Beh-tower on Hose-house No. 12, 373 

Reorganization of Fire Dept., 407 

Hook and i^adder liouse Wash. Sij., 410 

Fire Commission, 412, 421 

Revision of City Charter, 422, 4-32 

Water from Sudbury river, 431 

Furnishing passes on ferries, 442 

Salaries of Fire Commissioners, 458 

Anniversary of great fire, 465 

Establishing Public Parks, 482, 504 

Soup for the Poor, 490, 535, 554, 555 

Stoughton St. railroad crossing, 495 

Repairs of Broadway Bridge, 508 

Purchase of Austin Farm, 529 

Public Park question, 552 

Appropriation for Pub. Lib., 566 

Permit to heirs of \Vm. Brigham to locate steam engine, 575 

Resolution of Thanks to Chairman, 578 
■Clocks — 

Order to place clock on new School-house at City Point, 127 

Order passed for repairs of clock on County Jail, 191 

Order passed to jilace clock on tower of Ticknor School- 
house, 231 

Report Inexpedient to place clock on tower of Ticknor 
School-house discussed and rejected, 238 
-Cochituate — see Water. 
-Common Council — 

Members appointed special police, 40 

Clerk of, allowed $50U extra for extra services, 575 

Order passed for new carpeting, 575 
Oommon and Public Grounds — $16,000 appropriated, 162 

Order to pay John Galviri for expenses, 169 

Petition of Beacon Base-ball Club, for restoration of jjor- 
tion of, as play-ground, 178 

Orders relating to, recommitted, 187 

Hearing on limits of base-ball grounds, 187 

Orders relating to, considered. 197 

Discussion on concrete for, 197 

Independence Square improvements authorized, 198 

Base-ball playing, report on, 198 
" '■ " discussion on, 198 

" " " letter from a sufferer, 199 

Order (rejected) and discussion on erecting fence on Com- 
monwealth Avenue, 210 

Petition of Geo. B. Emerson and others, relating to elm 
trees. 217, 249 

Madison Square, improvements authorized, 219 
" •• report on filling, 219 

Fence on Commonwealth Avenue authorized, 221 

Unauthorized discharge of cannon on the Common, 2-30, 240, 
282, 293, 352, 371 

■ Order relating to asphalt walks, 303 

Discussion and passage of order for selling fence on Tremont 
Street, 309 

Petition of Howe & French, 319 

Washington Park, erection of new flag-stafi' authorized, 327 
. Order passed to transfer fence on Tremont street to Mount 
Hope Cemetery, 341 

Orchard Square, improvements authorized, 353 

South Boston squares, improvements authorized, 353 

Tool-house an 1 shed authorized, 353 

Washington Park, additional for grading, 429 

Order to appoint Joint Special Committee on Public Works, 
and discussion on establishing public parks, 481, 491, 
503, 549 

Lease of Greenhouse on Public Garden authorized, 483 

$100 additional appropriated for watering streets and public 
grounds. 494 

Washington Park, order passed for $1,100 additional for im- 
provements, 501 

Committee authorized to expend $4,500 for remainder of 
financial year, 56 1 
■Constables — 

Powers conferred on Superintendents, 72 
Contingent Expenses — 

Chairman of Board of Aldermen authorized to approve 
bills, 56 
•County of Suffolk — 

Communication from Register of Probate on classiflcation 
of papers, 9 



Report on petition for land d.T,magps, Washington avenue, 
Chelsea. 24; order for payment of. 27, 77 

Order authorizing general repairs 0)1 Jail, 53 

Order authorizing general repairs on Court House, .53 

Oflicers to be paid by City Auditor and Treasurer, 76 

Order passed rescinding order of 22d January. 1873, to pay 
land damages on Washington Avenue, Chelsea, 77 

Requisition from Sheriff approved, 132 

Order passed for repairs and furnishing Court House and 
Probate liuilding, 143 

Jail requisition for 1872,-3.-4 approved, 178 

Discussion on removing clock lower on Jail, 181 

Reg. Deeds, com. authorized to arrange for indexes, 221 

Jail, requisition for $l,628.:i7 passed, Z21 

Mun. Court, Southern Dist., to occupy Police Station No. 9, 
and remove to City liall Building, Roxbury, when 
ready, 221 

Coramuincation from Grand Jury, 247 

Repairs on Jail authorized, 284 

Payment of monthly bills, and pay-roll of Jail authorized, 
305 

Repairs and furniture authorized for Probate office, 318 

Court House, repairs and furniture authorized, 318 

Municipal Court Rooms, Southern and Dorchester Dis- 
tricts, furniture authorized, 318 

Order passed to pay D. S. Gilchrist $750 for work, on Pro- 
bate docket and papers, 418 

Municipal Court Room, Southern District, additional appro- 
l^riation tor, 444 

Committee to report on expediency of petitioning for annex- 
ing Chelsea, Revere, and Winthrop to Middlesex, 474 

Report and order on annexing Chelsea, Revere, and Win- 
throp to Middlesex, 483 

Jail expenses, 317, 382, 442, 489, 562 

Discussion of report on limits of, 495 

Committee authorized to refer claim of Edwin Wright, 515 

Re25ort accepted inexpedient to extend accommodations in 
Clerk's office of Superior Court, Civil Business, 548 

Report accepted referring to Treasurer petition of Paymas- 
ter in Municipal (.Jourt for increase of salary, 584 

Order passed for preparation of classified index to Probate 
records, 565 

Report accepted inexpedient to erect new Court House for 
Southern District, 566 

Orders passed providing for classified Index to Probate Rec- 
ords, and rescinding order approved l^cc. 30, 1873, 567 

Order relative to setting ott' Chelsea and Revere, referi'ed to 
next City Council, 575 
Cutter (Alderman) — 

Elected Chairman of Board of Aldermen, 2 

Address on acceiJting position of Chairman, 2 

Remarks, viz. : on 

Order relating to small-pox hospitals, 11 

Payment for work on small-pox hospital, 93 

Widening and extension of Arch Street. Ill 

Fireworks and ballooning 4th of July, 218 

Music on Common, 248 

Halleck-Street District, 270 

Payment of salaries in Normal School, 837 

Fire Commission, 413 

Revision of City Charter, 422 

Water from Sudbury river, 432 

Salaries of Fire Commissioners. 458 

Repairs of Broadway bridge, 503 

Soup for poor, 538, 555 

Response to Resolution of Thanks, 579 

Drainage — 

Order to pet'n Legislature for authority to raise grade of 
certain territory, 63 

East Boston Ferries — see Ferries. 

East Boston R. Co. — pet'n for acceptance of charter, 371 

Report on accepting act of incor., 443. 

Charter accepted, 453 
Elections — 

State — orders respecting voting lists, and issue of warrants, 
420 

Com. appointed to examine returns, 459 

Re|)ort on returns, 465, 468 

Municipal — Order piissed for revision of voting lists, 483 

Warrants for, 495 

Report on returns accepted. .527 

Order passed relative to transferring to registers, voting 
lists, etc.. 535 

Report accepted on returns for Ward officers of Wards 2 
and 19, 648 
Emery (Alderman) — remarks, viz.: on 

Order relating to small-pox hospitals, 12 

Refreshments, 56 

Accommodations for city officers, 67, 74 

Widening of Wash St., 119 

Normal School accommodations, 172 

Restriction of use of steam on Freight Railroads, 190 

Erection of Grammar School-house, Dudley Dist., 197 

Removal of fence on public grounds, 211 

Widening of Water St., 222 



6 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



Recommendations in relation to Fire Dep't, 251 

Removal of sidewalk adjacent to Common, 269 

Filling So. Bost. Flats. 278 

Payment of salaries in Normal School. 300, 307 

Authorizing com. on reorganization Fire Dep't to visit other 

cities, 301 
Bell tower on Hose-house No. 12, 373 
Home for the Poor, 387. 409 
Furnishing passes on ferries. 442 
Furnishing gas in streets, 443 
Salaries of Fire Commissioners, 457 
Establishment of Public Park, 491, 508, 549 
Repairs of Broadway Bridge, 508 
Soup for Poor, 537 

Permit to heiis Wm. Brigham to locate Steam Engine, 575 
Resolution of thanks to Chairman, 679 

Ferries — 

Order passed for building new ferry -boat, and improvements 

in ferry houses, Ibo 
Order passed to pave approaches to new drops. North 
Ferry, E. B., 342 

Com. from Directors, on sale of ferry-boat, 430 

Report on award of contract for new boat. 4.31 

Report and order to furnish passes discussed, 442 

Report and order passed to sell boat Jetierson, 454 

Com. from Directors, requesting payment of extra bills on 
new boat, 455 

Order passed to pet'n for extension of time for holding land- 
ing. 470 

$3,000 appropriated to finish and furnisli new boat Win- 
throp, 412 

Free passes foi' Police, indefinitely postponed, 535 
Fire Alarms — 

Care of bells, clocks, and control of appropriation, vested in 
com. on, 25 

"Winlock Joseph, Professor, order passed to pay for furnish- 
ing true time, 343 

New Alarm repeater for Central Office authorized, 353 
Fire insurance ])istricts — Report on, and order passed, 202 
Fire Department — 

Order relating to right of way for Steam fire engines. 33 

Order passed to pay for service of steam-tug Louis Osborn 
at fire, 35 

Test of chemical fire engine, 40 

Order passed for purchase of supplies, 44 

Order passed for repairs, 44 

Order to pay Atlantic Works for materials to fire-boat, 44 

Order to replace i^ortable fire-extinguishers, 45 

heport on location of Hose Co. No. 5 on Upton St., 77 

Resolution of sympathy with families of firemen killed at 
fire on Hanover St., 89 

Order to locate steam fire engine in Chester Hose House, 
Northampton St., 102 

Leave to withdraw on pet'n that D. W. Crockett be appoint- 
ed foreman of Hook and I^ndder Co. No. 4, 102 

Report for increase of appropriation for relief of disabled 
firemen, 102 

Order passed for repairing fire-reservoir on Warren St., 103 

Chief engineer authorized to employ additional assistance, 
103 

Ordinance relating to election of officers, passed, 127 

Order to purchase six hundred feet of hose, 151 

Order to pay for new hose carriage for Co. 12, 151 

Chief avithorized to purchase selt-acting engine, 152 

Order for change in time for report of Chief Engineer. 161 

Hose house Four, Northampton St., alteration for .steam fire 
engine, 169 

Order to purchase hose, 179 

35th annual report of, 181 

Engine No. 18, order passed to place horse hose carriage in 
house of, l'J6 

Engine No. 7, order passed to place horse hose carriage in 
house of. 196 

Engine No 23 order passed to place horse hose carriage in 
house of, 196 

Hook and Ladder No. 14, order passed to purchase land on 
Dudley and Forest Sts. for. 197 

Sherman, (r., order to pay for injuries, 207 

Wetherell,Eben, " " " 207 

Order passed to place fire-alarm clock; on Prescott School- 
house. East Boston, 219 

Com. authorized to visit steam fire engine establishments, 
220 

Com. from Mayor relating to, 228 

Order passed for investigating cause of fire of May 30, 1873, 
231 

Com. from Mayor transmitting com. from insurance repre- 
sentiitives, 238 

State regulations relating to fires, 241 

Order passed prohibiting sale of fireworks, 241 

Hose carriage No. 12, order passed to equip horse hose Co., 
242 

Order of inquiry relating to right of way for steam fire en- 
gines, etc., 242 

Joint special com. ap. on reorganizing. 247 

Order passed rescinding order of June 6, relating to investi- 
gation of recent fire, 247 



Com. from City Solicitor, on rights in streets. 249 

Com. from olBcers of companies, relating to changes desired, 
and discussion on reference. 251 

Order discussed and passed, for com. on reorganization of 
to rcp't in print on cause of fire of May 30, 251 

Petitions for changes in, from over 3,000 citizens and tax- 
payers, and debate on reference, 252 

Com. on Reorganization to employ short-hand reporter, and 
send for persons and papers, 259 

Reorganization of, pet'ns from over 2,500 citizens and tax- 
payers, 258 

Report from Com. on, 260 

Com. from Inspectors, on burnt district construction, 261 

Engine house No. 20, order passed to equip horse hose 
carriage, 261 

Act accepted giving Engineer exclusive command at fire, 
231 

Order passed to sub.stifute horse hose carriages, 261 

Order passed to purchase four engines, five horse hose car- 
riages, one H. .V L., and discussion of, 261 

Resignation of Assistant Engineer, Zenas E. Smith, re- 
ferred, 203 

Order passed to print and distribute public notices relating 
to signal boxes. 271 

Order passed to repair tclegraph.% etc., 272 

Engine house No. 20, discussion on purchasing horse hose- 
carnage, 277 

Orders passed relating to sale of fireworks. 281 

Ordinance in relation to demolishing buildings, 288 

Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1, le;ive of absence, 2y3 

Order to repair and alter the fire-boat, 300 

Discus.sion on authorizing committee on reorganization to- 
visit other cities, 301 

Removal of fireman, Geo. A. Kennison, 305 

Reward oflei-cd for deteiition of persons setting fire, 309 

Com. on Reorganization authorized to visit other cities, 309' 

Company authorized for Steamer 1i, 327 

Order passed to jilace Fire-alarm on School-house in Prince- 
ton St., 341 

King. James S., order passed to pay for injuries, 352 

Hose house No. 12, erection of bell-tower authorized, 352 

Companies authorized for Steamer No. 25, Wash. Sq., 353 
" H. & L. " '• 353 

Removal of Thomas C. Soesm:in. 367 

Exhibition of fire apparatus of S. R. Russell, 371 

Order passed to reoiganize Companies 4 & 7, 373 

Steamer No. 8, repairs authorized, .373 

Steamer No. 15, repairs authorized, 373 

Hose house No. 12. discus.-^ion on ei-eeting bell-to-«'er; 373 

Engine house Ward 14, repairs authorized, 398 

Com. from Board of Trade. 398 

Debate on reorganization of, 399 

Fire Commission, discus.sion on, and recommittal -with in- 
struction to report ordinance. 411 

Fire Commission, i-eport received and referred, 35 

report of revised ordinance, discussion, and adoption by 

sections. 420 

Fire Engine No. 24, company organized, 444 

Fynes, Jonas, $50 to be paid for injuries, 444 

Order passed relative to Commissioners' interfering with' 
Engineers at fires, 4.53 

Ordinance rehuive to records passed, 453 

Rept. and order for salaries of members. 456 

Reports and disci ssion on salaries of Fire Commission ers,- 
and order passed, 456 

Salaries of Fire Commissioners established, 465 

Fire Commissioners nominated. 465 

Order passed establishing salaries of oflricers. 467 

Fire Commissioners, discussion on confirming. 467 

Order passed for purchase of one of Ilolloway's chemical 
engines, 470 

Report on condition of, 471 

Fire Commissioners confirmed, 474 

Report and order to purchase Skinner's fire escapee, 474 

Order to jiurchase Skinner's fire escape referred to Fire 
Com., 481 

Order to prepare ordinance for punishment for false fire 
alarms, 495 

Resignation of As.sistant Engineer. 495 

Majority report relative to commissioners interfering at 
fires, 503 

Report of ordinance relative to false fire alarms, 503 

Ordinance passed to prevent false fire alarms, 514 

Report on Steam fire engine on Albany St., 516 

Report accepted, inexpedient to legislate on control of 
engineers at fires, 535 

Report relative to better protection where combustible 
materials arc stored, referred to Fire Com., 5.34 

Report (from Council) relative to interference with engineers- 
at fires, discussed and indefinitely postponed, 546 
Fourth July — 

Appropriation for Fireworks, and Balloon voyage, requested, 
and discussed. 218 
Fort Hill Improve ment — Special committee and powers. 25 

Mayor authorized to contract for building partj' walls, 272 
Fort Hill Wharf— Order to purchase. 317 

Order to pay Wm. R. Clark $160,OCO. 326 

Order passed to purchase subject to mortgage, 382 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



Funds — (sec also Sinking Funds) — 
Fninlvliii Fiiiul, report on. TOO, 179 

bcni'fil ol'ijriuiled to Herbert C. Looke, 179 

Dorcliester Trust Funds, Treasurer's accounts, 217 
Stougliton Seliool and Poor funds, report on Treasurer's 

accounts. 240 
Aljbott Lawrence Fund, report of, 326 

Q-. A. R. — Allowanec for Decoration day, 179 

Invitation of Post, to Decoration ceremonies, accepted, 187 
Invilalion from I*ost 7 accepted, to attend dedication of 
Monument at ilt. Hope, 420 
Gas — 

Order for State Inspector to report on quality of gas fur- 
nished to city, 197 
Report from State Inspector, in regard to standard of, 25S 
Order passed to petition for power to require laying of 
pipes, 4-13 
Gnffield (Alderman) — remarks, viz. : on 

Health commissioneis engaging in other business, 7 

Taking old aliiisliouse for hospital, 7 

Order relating to small-pox hospitals, 10-11 

Kefreshments, etc., 43, 53, f)6 

School Models at Vienna, 45, 46, 53 

Acconimodatio)is for city (jflicers, 67 

Payment for work on small pox hospital, 91, 180, 207 

Annexation of Brookline, 10-1 

Widening and extensicjn of Arch St. Ill 

Purchasing hind on Marlboro St. for primary school, 118 

"Widening of Washington St., 119 

Widening of streets around new P. O., 134 

Widening of Water St., 1J3, 222 

Normal School accommodations, 152, 172 

Reduction of nnniher of Truant officers, 171 

Removing clock tower on Jail, 181 

Repairs of clock on County Jail, 181 

Erection of Grammar School-house, Dudley Dist., 197, 211 

Base ball playing, 199 

Services of City Clerk, 211 

Fireworks and Ballooning 4th July, 218 

Purchasing Parker Hill for reservoir, 219 

Widening Wash. St. between Summer and Essex Sts., 232 

Locating steam fire engine in Parker St. 232 

Prohibiting sale of fireworks, 241 

Purchasing fire apparatus, 263 

Music on Common. 273 

Filling So. Bo.ston Flats, 280 

Payment of salaries in Normal School, 300, 306. 315 

Authorizing com. on reorganization of Fire Dept. to visit 
other cities, 301 

Selling fence from Common, 309 

Sale oY Mather School-house, 312, 430, 445 

Reorganization of Fire Dept. 405 

School a.''commodations for Washington Village, 408 

Home for the Poor, 409 

Fire Commission, 415, 421 

State Normal School. 419 

Revision of City Charter, 432 

Salaries of Fire Commissioners, 457 

Anniversary of great fire, 466 

Allowing Brookline to take water, 467 

Fire Commissioners, 467 

Establishing Public Parks, 482, 508, 552 

ISoup for the Poor. 491, 636, 555 

Removal of old Mather School-house, 503 

Repairs of Broadway Bridge, 508 

Religious services in Pub. Institutions, 532 

Resolution of 'J'hanks to Chairman, 577 
Gibson (Alderman) — Remarks, viz. : on 

Health commissioners engaging in other business, 7 

Taking old almshouse for hospital, 8 

Order relating to small-pox hospitals, 12 

Character of police, 40 

School Models at Vienna, 45 

Refreshments, 36 

Accommodations for city officers, 35, 66, 67, 68, 74, 94 

Payment for work on small-pox hospital, 91, 208 

Annexation of Brookline, 104 

Widening and extension of Arch St. Ill 

Widening of Washington St.. 112, 119 

Taking Parker Hill for reservoir, 128 

Widening of Water St., 143 

Normal School accommodations, 152, 172 

Reduction of number of truant-officers, 172 

Limits of base ball grounds, 189 

Restriction of use of steam on freight railroads, 190 

Repairs of clock on County Jail, 191 

Hiring portion of Mercantile wharf for additional market 
facilities, 191 

Concrete for Common, 197 

Erection of Grammar School-house, Dudley District, 197 

Removal of fence on public grounds, 210 

Services of City Clerk, 211 

Fireworks and Ballooning 4th July, 218 

Widening of Washington St. between Summer and Essex 
Sts., 231 

Erecting temporary building for fire engine on Burnt Dis- 
trict, 233 



Water from Beacon Hill reservoir for Fire Department, 242 

Laying pipes from Beacon Hill reservoir. 247 

Objections to wooden pavements in So. Boston sts., 259 

Purchase of fire apparatus. 2Cl, 262 

Removal of sidewalk adjacent to Common, 269 

Halleck St. District, 271 

Music on Common, 272 

Purchasing horse hose carriage for Engine No. 20, 277 ' 

Filling .^o. Boston Flats, 280 

Payment of salaries in Normal School, 300. 307, 315 

Authorizing Com. on Reorganization of Fire Dept. to visit 

other cities, 301 
Removal of constable Whitticr. 305 
Selling fence from Common, 309 
Sale of Mather School-house, 312, 317, 447 
Renewal of market leases. 314 
Placing Tobey's apparatus on City Hall, 315 
Site for small-pox liospital, 3S8 
Bell-tower on hose house No. 12, 373 
Home for the Poor. 387, 4U9 
Reorganization of Fire Department, 406 
Fire Conmiission. 421 
Water from Sudbury river. 431 
Furnishing passes on ferr.es. 442 
Furnishing gas in streets, 443 
Immoral exhibitions, 455 
Salaries of Fire Commissioners, 457 
Fire Commissioners, 467 

Rebnildiiis foundations of Broadwa3' Bridge, 481 
Est-ablishins,' Public Parks, 482 
Sale of pouTtrv, 482 
Soup for the Poor, 491, 536, 555 
Establishing g:ites at railroad crossings, 495 
Home for tlu! Poor, 501, 519 
Kemoval of old Mather School-house, 503 
Repairs of Broadway Bridge, 508 
Purchase of Austin Farm, 528 
Public Park question, 552 
Annexation of Winthrop, 563 

Permit to heirs of Wm. Brigham to locate steam engine, 575 
Grain — fees established, 353 

Harbor — 

Report and order to pay $71,837.93 to State, on Atlantic 
Ave., 187 

License to T. J. Dunbar revoked for removing gravel from 
beach of Long Island, 196 

Com. from Mayor on removal of gravel from Long Island, 217 

Order to report authority for removal of gravel from Long 
Island, 429 

Communication from Mayor and U. S. Engineer, on taking 
gravel fiom Long Island, 480 

Report accepted referring removal of gravel to next City 
Council, .566 
Harbor Commissioners — 

Notice of hearing on structure for Yacht Club, 294 
Health — Supt. authorized to contract, 25 

Supt. authorized to employ clerk and assistants, 77 

Annual report of Supt., 125 

Order passed for erection of City Stable on Highland St., 19^ 

Report on oft'al contract of 1872, 305 

Ordinance relative to removing stable manure, 384, 398 

Keport on restricting locomotive whistles, 502 

Order passed to contract for removal of house offal. East 
Boston, 504 
Health, Board of — 

Not to engage in other business, discussed, 7 

Nominated, 7 

Ordinance passed, restricting from other business, 7 

Elected, 12 

Requested to apply to City Council for any additional power 
or facilities needed, 23 

Organization of, 23 

Expenses incurred by, chargeable to what appropriations, 25. 

Annual report, 2S9 
Highland St, Railway Co. — 

Exten.sion in Dudley St., hearing and discussion of, 179 

Location on Dudley St. authorized, 190 

Acceptance of location granted May 5, 196 
Hinckley Locomotive Works — 

Authorized to construct track from Albany Freight Railway 
and Albany St., 162 
Home for the Poor — 

Report on Mayor's address, 344 

Discussion on, 355, 385, 409, 501 

Discussion on purchase of site, 517 

Order passed to purchase Austin site, 527 

Order for plans referred to next City Council, 575 
Hospitals — see City Hospital, also Small-pox. 
Hulbert (Alderman) — Remarks, viz. : on 

Health Commissioners engaging in other business, 7 

Taking old almshouse for hospital, 8 

Order relating to small-pox hospitals, 12 

Opening Puldic Library on Sundays, 34 

Character of jiolicc, 40 

R. freshments, etc., 35, 42, 54, 65 

School Models at Vienna, 45 

Ti'ansfer of appropriations hy Auditor, 65 



INDEX TO PKOCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



Accommodations for city oflicors, 68, 67, 94 

Location of Metropolitan li. R. Station. Bavtiett Street, 78 

Payment for work on sniall-pox liospital, 93 

Annexation of Brookline, 103 

AVidoning and extension of Arch Street, 111 

"Widening of Wasliington Street, 112 

Kcstriction of lue of steam on freiglit railroads, 190 

Payment of salaries of Normal Sehuol, 3.7, 315 

Sale of Mather School-house, 312 

Placing Tobey's apparatus on City Hall. 315 

Home for the Poor, 355. 885, 40.i, 501, 517 

Site for small-pox hospital. 36S 

Supplying water on Holly system. 371 

Reorganization of Fire Department. 404 

School accommodations for Washington Village, 408 

Procuring suitable licence for hoisting beams, 409 

Fire Commission, 413, 421 

State Normal School, 418 

Obscene publicatii/ns, and exhibitions, 423, 455 

Revision of City Charter, 432 

Furnishing passes on ferries, 442 

Hayes's Stable. 445 

Cancelling sale of old Mather School-house, 448 

Anniversary of great fire, 465 

Allowing Brookline to take water, 467 

Erecting bi'idge at Dartmouth Street over B. & P. R., 467 

Fire Commissioners, 467 

Rebuilding foundations of Broadway Bridge, 431, 508 

Establishing Public Parks, 482, 491 

Sale of poultry. 482 

Wasliington Park, 501 

Removal of old Mather School-house, 503 

Religious services in Pub. Insts., 514, 532 

Purchase of Austin Farm, 627 

Soup for the Poor, 533, 536, 555 

Annexation of Wiiitlirop, 563 

Appropriation for I'lib. Lib,. 566 

Armory appropriation f<n- Co. D., First Bat. Cav., 567 

Permit to heirs \Vm. Brigliam to locate steam engine, 576 

Resolution of Thanks to Chairman, 571 

India Wharf— Portion to be designated as India Sijuare, 53 
Inspection of Buildings — see Buildings. 

Jail — see County of Suffolk. 

Knights of Pythias — Invitation to review, 311 

Jjamp Department — 

Superintendent authorized to make purchases, 25 
Annual report of Superintendent, '^7 

Order passed for committee to examine New York method 
of lighting, 354 
Jjands — see Public Lands. 
J^aw Department — 

Ordinance to provide additional Assistant Solicitor, 179 

Annual report of City Solicitor, 21J2 

Mayor vested with power to execute legal instruments for 

redeeming lands, 372 
Discharge of mortgage given to City of Roxbury bj' An- 
thony Garrett and Stephen Ellis, 502 
I^aw Library (Social) — 

Report and order for annual appropriation, 483 
Order passed to pay §1,000, 4SS 
Legislative Matters — 

Com. on, and Com. on Inspection of Buildings authorized to 
apply to General Court in regard to height buildings, 35 
Order passed for committee to report in print, 484 
Report on, 502 

Request for time for laying out street across South Bay, 516 
Lighters — see Ballast Lighters. 
Licenses — 

Report and order passed allowing Somerset Club to use 
bowling alleys, 575 
Loans — 

Report on order for $2,000,000 additional to BurntDistrict, 34 
Report and order passed, authorizing issue of bonds of 

$5,000,000 to commissioners, 44 
Burnt District, additional $2,000,000, 45 
$10,000 additional authorized for engine-house, AVd. 14, 77 
Communication from Commissioners under Loan Act, clos- 
ing the commission. 113 
Burnt District, report and order for $2,000,000 additional, 118 
$500,000 fur expense of additional water supply, 140 
Consolidation of Burnt Di'^trict Loan to £1.000.000, 151 
Order to meet expenses of Fire Loan C ;mmission, 101 
$4,000,000 temporary loan in anticip ition of taxes, 187 
$115,000 for Water- Works in Wards 13, 14, 15, 16, 219 
$161,000 for reservoir on Parker Hill. 219 
$80,000 for Primary School-houses, East Boston, 231 
$85,000 for Stjible on Highland Street, 231 
$28,000 for Hose house at Longwood. 232 
$40,000 additional for extension of Columbus Avenue, 259 
$30,000 for Engine house cor. Upton Street, 261 
$50,000 for Engine house near Washington Square, 259 
$105,000 for School-house on Houghton Place, 277 
$250,000 for widening Washington Street, between Avery 
and Boylston, and of Essex Street, 289 



$110,000 for purchase of Fort Hill Wharf, 326 
$15,000 for Engine and Hose house. Mason Street. 341 
$40,000 for police station house, Adams Street, 341 
$15,000 for Engine and H. & L. bouse, Washington Square, 

341 
$114,000 for Broadway Bridge, 508, 545 
$175,000 i\n- Water Works, 514 
$200,000 for extension of Eastern Avenue, 575 

Mayor — Order passed for printing Inaugural Address, 3 
Disposition of 'J'opics in inaugural address, 10 
Ephraim Emer^o i appointed Clerk, 27 
Resignation of. 4SS 

Empowered to execute legal instruments for redeeming 
lands, 372 
Maj'or, Communications from, viz. : 

Relating to an Act authorizing formation of Insurance Com- 
panies, 125 
Veto of insurance transfer to Wm. Smith & Co., 248 
Transmitting Solicitor's opinion on right of Fire Dep't in 

streets, ^49 
Removing constable Whittier, 305 
Announcing vacancy in Overseers of Poor, 382 
Markets — Quarterly report Supt. Haneuil Hall, 40, 206. 316, 453 
F. H, Market, Supt. authorized to employ deputy, 117 
Order to hire portion of Mercantile Whf. for additional facil- 
ities. 191 
Order passed providing for additional accommodation on 

India Whf,. 201 
Order for additional accommodation on Mercantile Whf. 

indefinitely postponefl. 201 
Supt. authorized to close end of So. Market St. occasionally, 

221 
Assignments of stands to applicants, 2.50 
F. H. Market, leases authorized and restricted, 314 
Pet'n relating to Poultry trade. 350 
Report and order relating to sale of poultry, 482 
Mass. Catholic Societies — Invitation to review accepted, 398 
Metropolitan K. Co, — Acceptance of Charles St. location, 9 
Older relating to Walnut Ave, location, 45 
Discussion in regard to Stable, 57 
Hearing on revocation of tracks on Walnut Ave., 73 
Order passed to locate Stable on Hartlett St., 77 
Report on revoking location on Walnut Ave., 90 
Order to revoke location on Walnut Ave., 101 
Hearing on Columbus .\ve, location, 161 
Authorized to extend location on Shawmut Ave., 198 
Additional location in Shawmut Ave., 206 
Hearing on extension in Stoughton St,, 310 
Right to lay additional track on Stoughton St. granted, 374 
Hearing on new tracks in Wash. St, and rep't accepted, 399 
Accept, location in Stoughton St., 410 
Hearing on tracks in Beacon St., 418, 441, 467 
Middlesex R. Co.— 

Hearing on petition of, for tracks on extension of Wash. St., 
52 
Militia — Order passed to pay for services at fire, 10 
Order to pay Co. B. First Bat. Cav.. 25 
Order to paj' Co. D and E, Ninth Reg. Inf. for special duty 

in Nov.. 28 
Co. K, Ninth Reg., $300 for furnishing armory, 44 
Co. A. Second Bat, Art'y, order to pay for attending camp 

in 1872, 64 
Co. A, Ninth Reg. Inf., armory approved, 81 
Co. K, Ninth Inf., allowance for repairs on armory, 89 
Co. A, Ninth Inf., rent allowed for armory, 8J 

" " allowance for repairs and furniture, 89 

Vote of thanks to Boston If'usi leers. 8y 
Co. A, Ninth Reg. Inf., order to terminate rent of armory in 

Ilimover St., 102 
Co. A. First Bat. Inf,, allowance for armory in Minot Hall, 

151 
Co. A, First Bat. Inf.. approval of armory, 152 
Co. B. Ninth Inf., pet'n lor additional rent for armory, leave 

to withdraw, 161 
Order passed for Leg, Com. to present amendment for reim- 
bursement of rents. 163 
Co.' A. Ninth Inf.. repairs on armory allowed, 169 
First Bat. Inf,. rent of armory discontinued, 169 
Co E, Ninth Reg., repairs of armory, 179 
Co. C, " '• " gun-ra'ck, 179 

Co. F, 1st Inf., leave to withdraw on pet'n for now armory, 

187 
First Bat. Cav., allowance for rent and fitting up. 187 
Com. to lep't on rent allowances for armories, '250 
Ninth R<'g Inf.. rent allowed for head-quarters, 354 
Fir^t Keg, Inf., rent transferred, 354 
Co. P, First Art,, order for repairs of armory, 371 
Co. I, Ninth Reg. Inf. armory 544 Wash, St. approved, 372 
Co. I), First Reg. Inf., rent for armory, 382 
Co. I, ■• " " " " 383 

Co, I. Ninth " " " " 383 

Report on rents of armories, 410 

Co. K. Fir.-t Reg. Inf, repairs on armory al'owed, 418 
Report on Regimental Armories, order in favor of passed, 433 
Ninth Keg., $375 authorized for fitting up head-quarters, 442 
First Co. Cadets, $1,200 authorized for rent of head-ouartere, 
442 



INDEX TO rUOCEEDINGS OF BOAEl) OF ALDEEMEN, 



9 



Co. F, First Rog., $450 for repairs of armory, 442 
Co. I, Ninth Reg., $700 for repairs of armory, 443 
" " " $52 " rent " " 443 

Co. B, Ninth Reg., armory rented, 240 
Order passed to pay companies for inspection duty in May, 

284 
Transfer of rent of armories from "Williams Hall to Minot 

Hall, 300 
Co. B and D, First B.it. Inf., armory approved, 303 
Order passed to pay Cos. A, B, C, l3. E, F, G, H, I, K, ninth 

Reg., and band of same, for inspcctkin duty in May, 303 
Order to pay Co. B, D, E. F, G, K, First Reg. inf., .and Bat. 

A and B, Light Artillery, for inspection'duty, 294 
Co. I, First Reg. Inf., order passed to pay for in.spection 

duty in Alay, 309 
Co. F, First Reg. Inf., armory approved, 475 

" " " " rent for armory, 483 

Ninth Inf., $200 appropriated for heiid-quarters, 4S9 
Co. B, Ninth Inf., $48.46 for rent of armory, 489 
Co. A, First Bat. Light Art., $000, repairs of armory, 489 
Co. E, " ■' leave to withdraw on pet'n for 

new armory, and order passed to discontinue rent, 489 
First Bat. Light Art., $250 for repairs of armory, 565 
Co. H, Ninth Reg., $1,000 per annum for rent of armory, 565 
Co. I, Ninth Reg. Inf., $383.10 appropriated for repairing 

and furnishing armory, 567 
Co. D, First Bat. Cav., reconsideration and discussion of 

order appropriating $200 for armory, 567 
Co. D, First Bat. Cav., $1,200 appropriated for armory re- 
pairs, 575 
Milk — Inspector of, annual report, 150 
Minors — regulation of sales by, 25 

Rules for licenses to, 45 
Mount Hope — see Cemeteries. 
Museum of Fine Arts — 

Order for modifj'ing conditions in deed, 116 
Music — Order passed for purchasing music-stands, 207 

On Common, order for discussed and rejected. 248, 272, 295 
On Common, order passed, and com. appointed, 301 

Northampton St. District — Debate in relation to, 57 
Order jjassed for Mayor to appljf to Legislature, 151 
Report and orders passed for raising grade, 327 
Order passed to procure estimates of cost of filling yards 

and cellars, 453 
Order to prepare plans for laying out streets, 453, 454 
$5,009 transferred for surveys, etc., 481 

Nuisances — 

Order to abate at corner of Portland .and Traverse Sts., 13 
Com. from Bd. Health, relating to, near Ruggles St., 258 
Halleck St. District, rep't on discussed and accepted, 270 
Stony Brook, order passed for abatement of, 300 
Orders passed relating to obscene pubhcations, and exhibi- 
tions, 423 

Old Colony and Newport Railway Co. — 

Order passed for erecting gate on Neponset Ave., 419 
Omnibuses — 

Brookline to State House, license to A. L. Johnson, 162 
Overseers of Poor — quarterly report of, 40, 186, 311, 453 

Annual report, 228 

Communication from, 382 

Alvan Simouds, elected to fill vacancy, 443 

Alvan Simonds, declined, 453 

Isaac F. Campbell, elected, 469 

P.aving — see also Streets — 

Report of commission on "Wood Pavements, 304 
Paymaster of State Aid — see Soldiers' Relief. 
Petroleum — 

Order passed to report ch.anges needed in ordinance, 534 
Police — Annual report of Chief, 21 

Chief authorized to purcliase supplies, 35 

Order in regard to Telegrajih fur, 64 

Quarterly report of Chief, 149. 277, 398 

Report to reduce Truant oflicers from ten to six, 169 

Number of men authorized, 170 

Increase of Sergeants. 170 

Reduction of Truant officers discussed, 171 

Order to procure plans for new Station house between I and 
K Sts., 187 

Report of amendment of regulations, 190 

Order passed to amend rules and regulations, 210 
" " print 1,000 copies riilcs, etc., 210 

Order to purchase site oti Adams St. for Station 11, and re- 
scind prior order. 2iS 

Com. from German Consul and others relating to harbor po- 
lice and police boat, 325, 3-50 

Com. from Chief in regard to police boat for Harbor, 325 

Com. from German Consul, 350 

Maximum number of lieutenants fixed at thirty, 535 

Rule adopted in regard to presents, 548 

Order passed for extra pay for police, 564 
Port Physician — quarterly report, 10 

Assistant, order to pay for extra services, 53 

Order to amend ordinance concerning, 64 

Ordinance passed defining duties, 90 



Power (Alderman) — Remarks, viz.: on 

Health Commissioners engaging in other business, 7 

Taking old almshouse for hospital, 7 

Order relating to small-pox hospitals, 12 

Additional accommodations for public oflicers, 35, 67, 08, 74, 
94 

Refreshments, etc.. 42, 53, 50, G5 

School Models at Vienna, 45 

Truant officers, 72, 171 

Location of Metropolitan R. Stable, Bartlett St., 77 

Payment for work on small-pox hospital, 92, 207 

AiHiexation of Brookline, 103, 104 

"Widening of Washington St., 112, 118 

Taking Parker Hill for reservoir, 128, 219 

"Widening of streets around new P. O., 134 

"Widening of Water St., 141, 160, 222 

Norm.al School accommod.itions, 172 

Payment of claims on Swett St. Hospital, 180 

Limits of base ball grounds, 189, 199 

Restriction of use of steam on Freight Railroads, 190 

Repairs of clock on County Jail. 191 

Hiring portion of Mercantile whf. for additional market facil- 
ities, 191 

Removal of fence on public grounds, 211 

Services of City Clerk, 211 

Fireworks and Ballooning 4th July, 218 

Fence on Commonwealth Ave., 222 

"Widening Washington St. between Summer and Esses, 231 

Erecting temporary building for fire engine on Burnt Dis- 
trict, 233 

Prohibiting sale of fireworks, 241 

Music on Common, 248, 272 

Recommendations in relation to Fire Dep't, 251 

Wooden pavements in So. Boston streets, 259 

Halleck St. District, 271 

Purchasing Horse hose-carriage for Engine No. 20, 278 

Filling So. Post. Flats, 278 

Widening of Tremont St.. 283 

Placing clock on tower of Ticknor School-house, 288 

Improvements of Sewers, 289 

Authorizing com. on reorganization of Fire Dep't to visit 
other cities, 301 

Payment of salaries of Normal School, 307, 315 

Selling fence from Common, .309 

Sale of Mather School-house, 312, 317, 429 

Home for the Poor, 355, 385, 409, 501, 518 

Site for small-pox liospital, 368 

Bell-tower on Hose house No. 12, 373 

Reorganization of Fire Dep't, 405 

Holly system for water, 4uy 

Fire Commission, 412, 421 

Water from Sudbury river, 431 

Revision of City Charter, 432 

Furnishing gas in streets, 443 

Cancelling sale of old Mather School-house, 448 

Salaries of Fire Commissioners, 457 

Fire Commissioners, 467, 474 

Rebuilding foundations of Broadway Bridge, 481 

Annexation of Brookline, 489 

Soup for the Poor, 491, 538, 547, 554 

Repairs of Broadway Bridge, 508 

Murder of Bridget Landergin, 514 

Religious services in Pub. lust's, 514, 531 

Purchase of Austin Farm, 527 

Duties of engineers at fires, 546 

Public Park question, 552 

Permit to heirs of Wm. Brigliam to locate Steam engine, 575 

Resolution of Thanks to Chairman, 578 
Probate — see County of Suflbik. 

Protestant Association — Invitation from, for a review, 51 
Printing — Request for additional appropriation, 44 

Order for committee to take charge of Census Abstract, 115 

Order passed to print 10,000 copies of acts of annexation, 247 

Report from Supt., 419 

Order passed for preparing and printing Index to City Coun- 
cil proceeding« of 1873, 564 
Prohibitory Ijaw — Pet'n to enforce, 341 

Hearing of 2,000 petitioners on enforcement of, 370 

Rei^ort on enforcement of, 408 

Report on pet'n to close saloons on Sunday accepted, 493 
Public Baths — Repairs and maintenance of, 181 

Erection of bath-house at Mt. Wash. Ave. bridge, 181 

Report on, 565 
Public Buildings — see also Schools 

Annual report of Supt., 20 

Engine house No. 12, report of land purchased, and ad- 
ditional aijpropriation for building, 23, 24 

Com. .authorized to supply and repair, 25 

Supt. authorized to partition large committee room in City 
Hall, 25 

Report on additional accommodations for public officers, 35 

Opening of skylights to City Hall, 44 

Additional accommodations for public offices, 66, 74 

Proposal of Baptist Society, Somerset St., to let rooms, 74 

Report inexpedient on apartments of First Baptist Society, 90 

Report and order to hire Mis.sionary Building, Pemberton 
Sq., for city oflicers, discussed and indefinitely i50St- 
poned. 94 



10 



INDEX TO PKOCEE DINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



City Hall, order passed for changes in rooms of Lamp Dept. 

and Sealers of Weights and Measures, 152 
Order passed for sale of old City Hall, Highland Dist., 231 
Order passed for erecting City Stable on Highland St.. 231 
Order passed for erecting Hose house at Longwood, 232 
Order passed for temporary accommodations in Parker St. 

for Steam tire engine, 232 
Order passed for erection of Police Station-house on Fourth 

St., 240 
Engine Co. 16, additional building authorized for H. & L. 6, 

259 
Oi'der passed for erection of Engine house on cor. Upton 

St. and Shawmut Ave., 261 
Order passed for Engine liouse. Mason St., 261 
Order passed to jjurchase estate of Nath. V\'hitin<r for Engine 

house, 269 
I Central Charity Bureau Building and Temporary Home, 

repairs authorized, 270 
Report on City Stable, Highland St., accepted, and order for 

building passed, 277 
Enlargement of City Hall, non-concurreuce, 289 
Order passed changing location of Hose house, Longwood 

Ave., 289 
City Hall, non-concurrence in order for connecting Niles 

block; and passage of order for leasing building in 

Peraberton Square. 301 
Engine house No. 10, repairs authorized, 295 
City Hall, report on Tobey's apparatus, 315 ; order passed 

to apply, 316 
City Hall, Standpipos, etc., authorized, 327 
Engine and Hose house. Mason St., order passed. 341 
I'olice Station house. Adams St., order passed, 341 
Non-concurrence in hiring Niles' block, 341 
Order passed to provide office accommodations for directors 

Public Insts., 354 
Order passed for Police Station District 11 to accommodate 

Branch Pub. Library, 371 
New Police Station, order rescinding plans for Branch 

Public Library. 389 
Police Station 11. order passed to rescind order for Public 

Library, 398 
Hook & Ladder house on Dudley and Forest Sts., 398 
Order passed to sell Engine house No. 12, 408 
Order passed for temporary accommodations for Hook and 

Ladder carriage near Engine No. 40, Wash. Sq., 410 
Engine house No. 12, order passed for $3,500 additional for 

completion of, 442 
Additional appropriation of $100 for music stands, etc., 444 
Engine house, x^lbany St., authorized, 444 
Order passed for new desks and platforms for Common 

Council Chamber, 408 
New Ward Room in Ward 10, report inexpedient accepted, 

545; in Ward 16, ditto. ,566 
Public Grounds — see Common, etc. 
Public Institutions — 

Order for Com. to consider order passed Dec. 22, 1871, in 

regard to Lunatic Hospital, 58 
Ordinance assigning Almshouse at Deer Island as house for 

neglected children, 198 
Communication from Board of Directors recommending 

changes in ordinance, sec. 7 and 8, 202 
Com. from Board of Directors, relating to inadequacy of 

rooms, 202 
Ordinance passed placing neglected children at Deer Island, 

207 
Order passed for telegraph lines to So. Boston, 240 
Report on transportation of prisoners accepted, 444 
Report on subject of Religious Services, 514 
Religious instruction, com. from Directors, and discussion. 531 
Resignation of Sam'l C. Cobb as Director, 533; referred to 

next City Council, 564 
Religious instruction, report of Directors recommitted, with 

instructions, 554 
Removal of Houses of Correction and Reformation referred 

to next City Council, 564 
Religious instruction, time for report extended to Jan. 1, 

1874, 564 
Prisons and Houses of Detention, semi-annual report, 567 
Religious instruction, report on, 575 
Public Lands, annual report of Supt., 19 
Boston Co-operative Association, 33 
Report leave to withdraw accepted, on petition of Wm. R. 

Clark for leave to purchase Town Slip, 210 
Report, and leave to withdraw on pet'n of Wm. R. Clark 

and others, for leave to purchase Lyceum site, Ward 16, 

210 
Report, and leave to withdraw on petition of Benj. Clapp 

for leave to purchase city land on Norfolk and Madison 

Sts., 210 
Supt. to take possession of lot on Albany St. leased to E. 

& R. W. Sears, 250 
Order passed to dispose of Swett St. Hospital buildings, and 

raise grade of land, 294 
Change of conditions in agreement with Blake & Rand, 419 
Order passed to transfer Swett St. Hospital and land to 

custody of Com. on Public Lands, 530 
Order passed to cancel bonds and take land of Ivory Bean 

and John S. Dunlap, 5S4 



Order passed to sell lot on Concord St. to Mass. Homoeopathic 
Hospital, 564 
Public Library — -Opening on Sunday, discussed, 34 

Remonstrance against opening Sunday, 34, 51, 

Order passed for opening Sunday, 34 

Annual report, 319 

Report and order passed for presorv.ation from lire, 382 

Thanks of City Council presented to Hon. Henry L. Pierce 
for donation of $5,000, and action of trustees approved, 548 
Public Park — see Common, etc. 

Quincy (Alderman) — remarks, viz. : on 

Health Commissioners engaging in other business, 7 

Taking old almshouse for hospital, 8 

Order relating to small-pox hospitals, 11 

Opening Public Library on Sundays, 34 

Refreshments, etc., 42. 54, 56, 65 

Hiring Miss'y Building, Pemberton Sq.,for city ofiicers, 94 

Aiuiexation of Brookline. 103 

Widening of Wash. St., 120 

Widening of streets around new P. O., 134 

Concrete for Common, 197 

Base ball playing, 179, 189 

Payment of claims, Swett St. Hospital, 91, 207 

Services of City Clerk, 211 

Fireworks and Ballooning 4th July, 218 

Widening of Water St., 222 

Discharge of cannon on Common, 230 

Erecting building for lire engine on Burnt District, 233 

State regulations relating to tires, 241 

Prohibiting sale of fireworks, 241 

Recommendations in relation to Fire Dept., 251 

Purchasing fire apparatus, 262 

Removal of sidewalk adjacent to Common, 268 

Halleck St. District, 271 

Music on Common, 272 

Purchasing Horse hose-carriage for Engine No. 20, 278 

Filling So. Boston Flats. 278 

Widening of Tremont St. 283 

Demolishing buildings at fires, 288 

Authorizing Committee on reorganization of Fire Dept. to 

visit other cities, 301 
Asphalt walks, 303 
Removal of Constable Whittier. 305 
Payment of salai'ies of Normal School, 307, .315 
Selling fence from Common, 309 
Sale of Mather School-house, 312, 317, 448 
Petition of Howe & French, 319 
Home for the Poor, 355, 409 
Site for small-pox hospital, 368 
Bell-tower on Hose house No. 12, 373 
Reorganization of Fire Dept., 406 
Fire Commission, 411, 420 
Revision of City Charter, 422, 432 
Regimental armories, 483 
Furnishing passes on ferries, 442 
Brookline's water supply, 444 
Salaries of Fire Commissioners, 457 
Anniversary of great fire, 465 
Fire Commissioners, 467, 474 
Hayes' stable, 471 
Annexation of Brookline, 488 
False fire alarms, 495 
Limits of Suffolk County, 495 
Public Park question, 503 

Explanatory of action of Ordinance Committee, 516 
I'urchase of Austin Farm, 529 
Soup for the Poor, 533, 536, 546, 554 
Duties of engineers at fires, 546 
Annexation of Winthrop, 562 

Extra pay for police, and on prohibitory liquor law, 564 
.\rmory appropriation for Co. D, First Bat. Cal., 667 
Permit to heirs of Wm. Brigham to locate Steam engine, 575 
Resolution of Thanks to Chairman, 577 

Registry of Deeds — see County of Suffolk. 

Refreshments — Order offered for definite appropriations, 35 

Order by Aid. Hulbert, discussed, 41, 42, 43, 44 

Substitute by Aid. Clark adopted and passed, 42, 43, 44 

Amended order from Council, 53 

Order indef. postponed, requiring order of City Council, 56 

Debate in relation to, 65 
Rewards oifered — 

$1,000 for apprehension of assassin of Bridget Landergin, 514 
Kowe's Wharf Corporation — 

Time allowed for removal of obstruction from Broad St., 470 
Rules and orders of last year adopted, 2, 7 

Committee to report required alterations, 3 

Cominittee to prepare joint rules, 3 

For City Council of 1873, adopted, 9 

For Aldermen, adopted, 9 

Order for pocket edition, 10. 

Salaries — 

For officers and crew of Steam fire-boat, 44 
Report of committee on salaries of city officers, 66 
Report and orders acted on, 74 
Assessors' Depaitment, extra for clerk hire, 91 



INDEX TO rUOCKEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



U 



Report and orders in a new draft, discussion and action 
thereon, 128 

Salary fixed for officers attending the sittings of Justices of 
the Municipal Court, Southern District, 134 

Second report and orders, as amended by the Common 
Council, considered ; non-concurrence on Superintendent 
Printing, 151; concurrence, 161 

Normal School, order passed to pay teachers, 210 

For City Solicitor, Assistants, and Clerk, 2")9 

$000 additional for Port Physician, 383 
Sayward (Alderman) — Kemarks, viz. : on 

Health Oommissiouers engaging in other business, 7 

'leaking old almshouse for hospital, 8 

Use of warning cards or flags in smnll-pox cases, 13 

Additional accommodations for public officers, 35, 94 

liefrcshnients, etc., 4'2, 53, 56 

Accommodations for city officers, 66, 67, 63, 74 

Location of Metropolitan R. U. Stable, Bartlctt Street, 77 

Payment for work on sniall-pox hospital, 91, 207 

Annexation of 13rookline, 104 

Widening of Washington Street, 118 

Normal School accommodations, 152, 172 

Reduction of number of Truant officers, 171 

Payment of claims on Swett-Street Hospital, 180 

Removing clock tower on County Jail, 181 

Repairs of clock on County Jail, 191 

Erection of Grammar School-house, Dudley District, 197, 211 

Base ball playing. 199 

Removal of fence on public grounds, 211 

Services of City Clerk, 211 

Necessity for Stable on Highland Street and at South Bos- 
ton, 231 

Music on Common, 248 

Recommendations in relation to Fire Department, 251 

Halleck-Strcot District, 271 

Widening of Treraont Street. 28S 

Placing clock on tower of Ticknor School-house, 288 

Improvements of Sewers, 289 

Payment of salaries in Normal School. 300, 315 

Old Mather School-house, 312, 317, 419, 429, 448, 503 

Renewal of market leases, 314 

Placing Tobey's apparatus on City Hall, 315 

Petition of Howe & French, 319 

Home for the Poor, 355. 409. 501, 519 

Site for small-pox hospital, 368 

School accommodations for Washington Village, 4'J8 

II. & L. house on Washington Square. 410 

Fire Commission, 422 

Revision of City Charter, 422 

Hayes's stable, 445, 471 

Immoral exliibitions. 455 

Salaries of Fire Commissioners, 457 

Anniversary of great fire, 465 

Fire Commissioners, 467 

Soup for the Poor, 490, 537, 554 

Stonghton Street railroad crossing, 495 

Religious services in Pub. Insts., 514. 532 

.Vdditional appropriations for Pub. Buildings, 533 

Annexation of Winthrop. 563 

Permit to lieirs Wm. Brighara to locate Steam engine, 575 

Resolution of Thanks to Chairman, 578 
Scliools — 

School Committee autliorized to exhibit Public School system 
at Vienna. 45 

Order for model school-house for Vienna exposition, indefi- 
nitely postponed, 53 

Drawing Schools, order to pay for use of rooms in Institute 
of Technology, 66 

Order for pliotographs of school-houses for Vienna exposi- 
tion rejected. 77 

Order passed to erect primary school-houses in Prescottand 
Chapman Districts, E. B., 90 

Order for purchasing land on Marlboro Street for primary 
scliool, 118 

Order to furnish Master's office in Harris School-house, 128 

Order to procure tablets for Starr King School-house, 128 

Order recommitted for purchase of land on Marlborough 
Street, 140 

Normal School accommodation discussed, and order passed 
authorizing use of Appleton Street School-house, 152 

Vote reconsidered, authorizing use of Appleton Street 
Scliool-liouse for Normal School. 161 

Minot Scliool, Wd. 16, order to purchase additional land for. 
162 

Normal School, discussion on accommodations, 172 

" " order passed authorizing use of Appleton 

Street School-house, 173 
Order for purchasing land on Marlboro Street. 179 
Discussion on erection of Grammar School-house, Dudley 

District. 197 
Order passed for plans of English High and Latin School- 
house, 207 

Order passed to purchase land for Primary school in Wd. 9, 

207 
Order of May 2, 1873, for loan for Primary school, amended 

from Ward 6 to Ward 9, 207 
Order passed for erection of Grammar school-house, Dudley 
District. 211 



Request to furnish City Council with copies of report on re- 
arranging School Districts. 221 

Order passed for erection of Primary school-houses in Pres- 
cott and CInipman Districts, E. B,. 231 

Order passed to purchase land on Quincy Street for Primary 
school-liouse, 277 

Order passed to erect Grammar school-house on Houghton 
Place, 277 

Reijuest of School Committee for additional accommoda- 
tions for Minot School, Washington Village District, 
r^awrence School District, Dorchester-Everett Scliool, 
294 

Ticknor School-house, alterations authorized, 269, 327 

Primary, on Newbury and Exeter Streets, order discussed 
and passed, 295 

Comins District, temporary accommodations authorized, 
295 

Oliver Primary, surrendered, 294; order passed for sale, 3S9 

Normal School, discussion on payment of salaries to Sept. 1, 
300, 315 

Old Mather School-liouse — order discussed and passed to 
cancel sale, 312; discussion on, 317; order passed to 
ascertain cost of cancelling sale, 371; report on cancel- 
ling sale, 419; discussion on cancelling sale, and refer- 
ence to conmiittee, 42H; report on cancelling sale, and 
order passed for, 445 ; order passed to report disposition 
of, 474 

Normal Scliool, report and discussion on payment of salaries 
to Sept. 1, and rejection of order. 306 

Minot Scliool District, additional accom. authorized, 309 

Dorchester Everett District, " '• •' 309 

Normal School, order passed to close rooms, 318 

Convention with School Committee October 14 to fill vacan- 
cy, 367 

Grammar School-house, L Street, order to complete furnish- 
ing, 398 

Washington Village. Grammar School, temporary accom- 
modations provided, 408 

Bigelow School District Grammar School, temporary ac- 
commodations provided, 408 

Order passed to place tablet on new school-house on site of 
Roxbury City Hall, 408 

Order passed to petition for State Normal School in Boston, 
418 

New Mather School-house, appropriation for furnishing and 
grading, 431 

Request from School Committee for school-houses and ac- 
commodations, 442 

Minot School-house, order passed for grading and fence, 453 

Bowditch School Building, order passed to furnish addi- 
tional accommodations for English High, and Evening 
School, 455 

Girls' High School, order passed for committee to report on 
legal establishment of, 468 

Lincoln School, order to provide office for master, 493 

Additional temporary accommodations for Primary scho^ds 
in Lewis District, 494 

Additional temporary accommodations for Primary schools 
in Gibson District, 494 

Additional temporary accommodations for Primary schools 
in Arlington and Parker streets, 495 

Girls' High School, reported legallj^ established, 495 

Minot School-house, order passed for out-houses, 501 

Additional accommodations Washington Village, referred 
to next City Council, 516 

Requests School Committee referred to next City Council, 
545 

Heath Street Primary School, order passed to furnish addi- 
tional accommodations. 547 

Girls High School, order passed to make changes for ena 
bling pupils to study photography, 547 

Gibson School District, temporary accommodations author- 
ized, 547 

Vernon Primary School-house, order passed to pave yard, 
564 
Sealers of weights and measures — Annual report of, 19 
Sewers — Additional appropriation requested, 23 

Report on additional api)ropriation, 34 

Order to construct in Sunnner St.. 117; Saratoga St., Rob- 
bins's Whf , Franklin St., 151; Chapman and Appleton 
Sts., Sawyer St., Third St., 163; Ruggles St., HallettSt., 
St. James St., Akron St., Regent St., Brook Ave.. North 
Ave., Stoughton St., West Cottage St., 170; George St., 
187; Old Harbor St., G St., 190; Shawniut Ave.. Clifford 
St., East St., Sixth St., Fountain St., 210; Neponset 
Ave., Taylor St., WoodSt., Walnut St., High St..Ericks- 
son St., 221; Harrison Ave., 240; Alpine St., Fruit St., 
247; Bolton St., Lexnigton St., Arch St., Silver St., 272; 
Brookline Ave., Longwood Ave., Chelsea St., Tudor 
St., Folsom place, Fir.st St., 302; Kingston St., Nor- 
folk Ave.. Stoughton St., Myrtle St., 311; Buckingham 
St., 317; Rockland St.. Catawba St.. Copeland St., .353; 
Washington St., Gouch St.. 372; Crescent Ave., New 
Heath St., Centre St., Paris St., Bremen St., Franklin 
St., T.aylor St., Water St., 409; Moreland St., Clifton 
St., Albion St., Hudson St., Cottage St., 410; Franklin 
St., Parker St., 431 ; Si.xth St.. 45b ; Westminster St., 494 
Order relating to improvements discussed and passed, 289 



12 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



Heanng on sewer in rear Beacon St.. 325 

Order passed to extend near foot of 15 and Seventh Sts. to 
Commissioners' line, 327 

Report on system of, 327 

Printed report on system accepted. 342 

Gouch St., licaring, 367 

Report for additional apjjropriation. 454 

Oi'der passed to finish construction in Kemp St., 547 
Silva, Manuel, report on petition, 41 
Sinking Funds — Report of commis.sioners, 32 

5th semi-annual report of, 302 
Small-pox — 

Joint Special Committee .appointed to take charge of Swett 
St. Hospital until organization of Board of Health, 3 

Order for taking old almshouse, Roxbury, discussed, 7 

Com. from CityPhysician, relating to jiatlents, 9 

Order passed relating to hospitals, 10 

discussion of same, 10, 11, 12, 13 

passage of same amended, 13 

Order respecting ho.spital at north part of city, 13 

Order passed for removal of patients to hospitals, 13 

Dr. Webb's answers to questions before Board of Aldermen, 
11 

Dr. Green's do.. 11 

Remonstrances against taking Roxbury almshouse, 12 

Order passed authorizing warning cards or flags on houses, 
13 

Order passed to provide reception-room for patients, 13 

Order to complete vaccination in districts, 13 

Order for fumigating public buildings, 13 

Order to provide for disinfecting air escaping from hospi- 
tals, 33 

Report on petition of Homceopathic Medical Society in re- 
gard to hospital, 65 

Pet'n of Jane Louge, for compensation as nurse, leave to 
withdraw, 77 

E. E. Hill, pet'n for compensation for use of house as small- 
pox hospital, leave to withdraw, 77 

Lydia A. Edgecomb, leave to withdraw on pet'n, for neglect 
to remove small-pox patient, 102 

Mary J. Melcher, leave to withdraw on pet'n for being con- 
veyed to small-pox hospital, 102 

Pet'n John II. Currier, refusal to remove small-pox patient, 
leave to withdraw, 161 

Order relating to closing hospital on Marcclla St., 171 

Com. from Board of Health in relation to hospital location, 
186 

Leave to withdraw on pet'n Chas. L. Beal, 209 

Report in regard to new iiospital, 354 

Report and discussion on site for hospital, 308 

Order to raise grade of Swett St. Hospital, and discussion, 
369 

Request from Bd. Health for sale Swett St. Hospital, 371 

Swett St. Hospital territory, order passed for grading, 389 

Order passed to transfer Swett St. Hospital to Public Lands, 
530 
South Boston Flats — Report on Mayor's Address, 220 

Indenture passed, 233 

Amendment relating to Eastern Ave. discussed and non- 
concurred in, 278 
South Boston Railroad — 

Hearing on i-emoval of tracks in Emerson St., 310 
Soldiers' Monument — Committee appointed, 44 
Soldiers' Relief — Quarterly report of Paymaster, 149, 277, 398 
Soup for Poor — Report of Chief of Police, on supjily of, 150 

Com. from Mayor and Overseers of Poor, 489 

Discussion on, subject referred to Overseers of Poor, 533 

Discussion on, order for indefinitely postponed, 535, 554, 555 

Order (from Council) for Overseers Poor to furnish, dis- 
cussed and indefinitely postponed, 506 
Stables — see also Health — 

Oi'der relating to licensing by City Council indefinitely post- 
poned, 53 

Hayes's stable, remonstrance and orders against rebuilding, 
418 

Hearing on rebuilding, 428 

Order to revoke license reconsidered, and indefinitely 

postponed, 445 

Report on petition to rebuild, 445 

Additional hearing on, 445 

Discussion rebuilding, letter from City Solicitor, and 

memorial from 28th Cong. Soc, 456 

Discussion, and letter from City Solicitor, 470 

State Aid — see Soldiers' Relief. 
Stebbins (Alderman) — Remarks, viz. : on 

Order relating to small-pox hospitals, 11 

Use of warning cards or flags in small-pox cases, 13 

Refreshments, 43, 56 

School Models at Vienna, 45 

Annexation of Brookline, 103, 104 

Taking Parker Hill for reservoir, 128, 219 

Restriction of use of steam on Freight Railroads, 190 

Hiring portion of Mercantile Wharf for additional market 
facilities, 191 

Erection of Grammar school-house, Dudley District, 197 

Payment of claims, Swett St. Hospital, 92, 207 

Services of City Clerk, 211 

Widening Washington St. between Summer and Essex, 231 



Prohibiting sale of fireworks. 241 

Laying pipes from Beacon Hill Res., 247 

Music on Common, 247 

Recommendations in relation to Fire Dep't, 2.51 

Purchase of fire apparatus, 261 

Halleck St. District, 271 

Purchasing Horse hose carriage for Engine No. 20, 278 

Payment of salaries in Normal School, 300 

Authorizing com. on reorganization Fire Dep't to visit other 
cities, 301 

Removal of Const.able Wliittier, 305 

Selling fence from Common, 309 

Sale of Mather School-house, 312 

Renewal of market leases, 314 

Placing Tobey's apparatus on City Hall, 315 

Grain fees, 3.53 

Home for the Poor, 355, 386, 619 

Site for sniall-pox hospital, 368 

Supplying water on Holly system, 371 

Bell-tower on Hose house No. 12, 373 

Reorganization of Fire Dep't, 399 

H. & L. house. Wash. Sq., 410 

Fire Commission, 411, 420 

State Normal School, 419 

Revision of City Charter, 422,.432 

W.ater from Sudbury river, 431 

Furnishing passes on ferries, 442 

Water from Mystic Pond, 443 

Hayes's stable, 445, 406, 471 

Salaries of Fire Commissioners, 456 

Anniversary of great fire, 465 

Allowing Brookline to take water, 467 

Fire Commissioners, 467 

Soup for the Poor, 491, 537, 554, 555 

Stoughton St. railroad crossing, 495 

Establisliing gates .at railroad crossings, 495 

Removal of old Mather School-house, 503 

Repairs of Broadway Bridge, 508 

Murder of Bridget Landergin, 514 

Purchase of Austin Farm, 529 

Public Park question, 552 

Permit to heirs Wm. Brigham to locate Steam engine, 575 
Steam Engines and Boilers — 

Hearing on pet'n J. F. Keating, 32 Lancaster St., 2.39 

Hearing on pet'n to locate at 1043 Wash. St., 567 

Report and discussion on permit to heirs of Wm. Brigham, 
575 
Street Commissioners — Annual rejiort of, 20 
Streets — 

Com. on Streets authorized to refer claims to arbitration. 24 

Supt. authorized to purchase supplies, lay cross-walks, fur- 
nish and set edgestones. pave gutters, number streets, 
erect fences, grant jiermits for moving buildings, grant 
permits to open streets, 24, 25 

Names of those crossing Dorchester St., 64 

Supt. to keep streets on burnt district clear, 91 

Order for Com. on Paving to report rules for sprinkling 
streets, 91 

Order to take estate of M. H. Glceson on Summer and High 
Sts. 102 

Rules for watering adopted, 102 

Widening of AVashmgton St. at corner of Summer St., 118 

Hearing on pet'n to cross Yarmouth St. with rail track, 126 

Remonstrance " " " " 126 

Order for sale at auction of estate taken from C. M. Wheel- 
wn-ight, on Water and Broad Sts., 127 

Enlargement of area around new Post Office, minority re- 
tjort accepted, 127 

Order presented for widening streets around new P. 0., 134 

East of Custom House, order to pave, 163 

Columbus Ave. extension, com. from B. & P. Railroad cor., 
and permission granted to withdraw proposal, 209 

Burnt District, watering authorized, 221 

Watering streets round Common and Public Garden author- 
ized, 221 

Permit to Faxon Bros, to lay pipe under and across Otis 
St., 284 

Order passed to purchase land adjoining station house lot. 
Fourth St., 2S9 

Order passed to purchase estate of N. E. M. Life Ins. Co., 

295 
Order relating to hoisting beams, 354 

Written notifications to be given before opening by Supt. 
Streets, Supt. Sewers, Gas-light Companies, Water 
Board, 354 
Back Bay Lands, order for preparing plan for laying out, 

373 
Order passed relative to laying streets on Back Bay Lands ; 
also between Savin Hill, Dorchester Ave, and So. Bos- 
ton, 383 
Walworth Manuf. Co. authorized to lay steam-pipes across 

Franklin and Hawley Sts., 384 
Hoisting-beams restricted, 383 

Wooden Pavement Commission, supplementary report re- 
quested and declined, 398 
Report on Wooden Pavements referred to Paving Com., 409 
Order passed for City Solicitor to pi-epare suitable license 
for hoisting-beams, 409 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



13 



Swett St. Dist., oi'dcr passed relative to improvement, 468 

Contiiiental Sugar Uefliiery, authorized to lay jiipes in First 
St., 470 

Order to consider expediency of establishing gates at rail- 
road crossings, i'Jb 

Rep't additional leg. required to lay out streets on Swett St. 
Dist., 501 

Order relative to name of Eastern Ave., 503 

Order passed for removal of flagstaff from cor. of Dudley & 
rulnam Sts., 648 

Committee on, order passed to pay J. H. Jenkins $300 for 
clerical services, 506 

Order to pay Edw. F. Robinson $150 for services to Com. 
on Streets, 567 

Order passed to pay $2,000 for services of James Dennie, 575 

- Arch St. — order passed for -widening and extension of. 111 ; 

grade established, 250; order passed to pave with wood, 533 

• Albany St. — order to pave, 302 

- A St. — John Souther to remove fence, 470 

• Alpine St. — order passed to grade and macadamize, 284 

■ Atlantic Ave. — order passed for Rowe's Whf. Corporation to 

remove building, 444 

■ Bedford St. — order passed to widen between Washington 

and Chauncy Sts., 27 ; order passed to widen, 169 
-Buckingham St. — order passed to set edgestones, establish 
grade, to grade. 454 

■ Brook Ave. — order to lay edgestones, 140: grade established, 

303 

• Bowen St. — grade established, 217 ; order passed for repairs, 

259 
-BushSt. — named, 140 
-Battery march St. — order passed to raise grade, 327: revised 

grade established, 444 

- Brookline Ave. — order to set back fence, and cut down trees, 

179 

- Berkeley St. — bill of conveyance to city of Boston, 221 ; order 

to accept conve3'ance of, 242; State conveyance to City ac- 
cepted, 250; order passed to macadamize, 309; order passed 
to pave sidewalk, 444 

- Beacon St. — order passed to water, 181, 201; order to pave 

with wood, 187; order passed to grade, 196 
-Blue Hill Ave. — order to set edgestones, from Warren to 
Schuyler St., 288 

- Boston St. — grade established, 217 ; newly named for part of 

Dorchester St., 409 

- Beverley St. — order passed to pave, 230 

- Boylstou St. — order passed to lay plank walks, 454 

- Brighton Ave. — order passed to water, 181 

■ Bremen St. — grade established, 250 

- Bolton St. — grade established, 217 ; order to grade, 217 

- Broad St. — order passed to widen, 238; order to sprinkle, 

284 

■ Brookline St. — Daniel Goodnow to remove bay window, 470 

- Chauncy St. — order passed fur widening, 81 

- Crtek Sq. — order passed to pave, 342, 352 

- Cabot St. — order passed for repair, 442 

- Channiiig St. — grade established, 103 

- Centre St. — order passed to pave sidewalks, 444 

- Commercial St. — order passed to pave, 221 

- Cobdeii St. — order passed for surface drainage, 419, 429 • 
■Congress St. — order passed for widening, 83; com. from 

Street Com. 132; resolve and order tor widening, 132; wi- 
dening on easterly side, non-concurrence with Street Com.. 
140 ; order passed to widen, 160, 187 ; order passed to raise 
grade, 327 

- Copeland St. — order to establisli grade, 454 

- Ceylon St. — order passed to grade, 533 

- Columbus Ave. — order to pave section with wood, 179; ex- 

tension to Bark Sq., report for additional loan of $40,000, 
250; extension, final conveyance by, and to B. & R. Rail- 
road, 258; order passed to pay B. & P. Railroad corpora- 
tion $325,000, 259; order passed to grade, 263; order dis- 
cussed and passed to water, 311; rep't leave to withdraw on 
pet'n for discontinuance accepted, 372 
-Commonwealth Ave. — order to macadamize and set edge- 
stones, 179 

- Clarendon St. — order passed to lay plank walks, 454 

■ Central St. — order passed to raise grade, 327 
-Causeway St. — order to Union Fr. R. R. Co. to pave, 190; 

order to Met. R. R. Co. to pave, 190; order to Cambridge R. 
R. Co. to pave, 190 

- Church St. — order passed to convey part of to B. & P. Rail- 

road cor., 259 

- Condor St. — order to pave, 382 

- Chandler St. — order to pave, 179 

- Camden St. — leave granted to remove trees, 455 

- Columbia St. — order passed to set edgestones, 295 

- Cottage St. — order passed to grade, 210; order passed to re- 

move obstructions, 210; grade established, 217 

- Clinton St. — order to pave, 288 

- Cedar St. — order to pave sidewalks, 354; order to lay brick 

walks, 367 

- Devonshire St. — grade established, 35 ; widening on easterly 

side, resolve and order for, passed, 141; order to grade ex- 
tension of, 161; order to pave, 302; report to re-number ac- 
cepted, 353 
■Dorchester St. — grade established, 217 



— Division St. — order to establish grade, 429 

— Dorchester Ave. — order for paving, 181; order to Metropoli- 

tan B. Co. to pave, 2UI ; order to So. Bost. R. Co. to pave, 
2Ul; order passed to pave sidewalks, 210; repairs author- 
ized, 272 

— Dale St. — order to set edgestones, 383 

— Dudley St. — order passed for repairs, 442 

— D or K St. — com. from Street Com. relative to extension of 

across Old Col. |{. K., 441 

— Emerson St. — purchase of triangular parcel of land author- 

ized, 170; order passed for repairs, 259 

— Eastern Ave. — older passed to pave, 221 ; in continuation of 

Congress St., report and order, 562; order passed for ex- 
tending, 575 

— Eustis St. — order to set edgestones and macadamize, 217; or- 

der to establish grade, 633; order passed to extend to Maga- 
zine St., 534 

— Eighth St. — order passed to pave, 247 

— Exchange Place — order to mei'ge in Congress Sq., and trans- 

fer name to Lindall St., 423 

— Essex St. — order passed to widen, 268, 367 

— Egglcston Sq. — order to set edgestones, and grade, 382 

— Eliot St. — Older passed to extend, 300: order to grade, 309 

— Federal St. — widening of, hearing and discussion, 79; order 

discussed and passed for widening, 81, 82, 83; grade estab- 
lished, 103; order passed to raise grade, 327 

— Foundry St. — order to extend name to extension, 101 

— Fourth St. — order passed to lower tracks, So. Boston R. Co. 

to conform to grade, 419 

— Franklin St. — order passed for widening and extension of, 84; 

grade established, 103; order passed to raise grade, 327; 
order to continue through Sturgis St. and re-number, 382 

— Forest Hill A\e. — order to release land to Saml. B. Pierce in 

exchange for land for street. 102 

— Franklin School-house — hearing on paving street near, 240 

— Forest St. — leave granted to remove trees, 455 

— Fleet St. — order passed to pave, 259 

— Gold St. — order passed for repairs, 259 

— Gridley St. — order to set edgestones. and pave sidewalks, 303 

— Guild St. — order to set edgestones and pave gutters, 327 

— Granite St. — estimate for extending, 441 

— Gates St. — repairs authorized, 263 

— Girard St. — order to grade, 309 

— Gouch St. — order passed to pave, 3.53. 367 

— Hawley St. — order passed to widen, 112 

— Haverhill St. — order passed to pave, 230 

— Hancock St. — order passed to set edgestones, 295 
•— H St. — order to grade, 217 

— Harrison Ave. — order parsed to i-epair sidewalks, etc., 230 

— Haynes St. — order to grade, 309 

— Highland Ave. — repairs authorized, 263 

— High St. Place. — order to grade, 309 

— Barley St. — order to establish grade, 454 

— Howard St. — order to grade, 309 

— Hawes St. — order passed to raise grade, 327 

— Harlow St. named, 494 

— I St. — order to pave, 383 

— Kingston St. — order not to build between Bedford and Sum- 

mer Sts., 152 

— Kilby St. — order passed to raise grade, 327 

— Lincoln St. — order passed to widen near Summer St., 58; 

order passed to widen, 160 

— Lewis i'ark — repairs authorized, 263 

— Lindall St. — order passed to raise grade, 327; order to change 

name to Exchange Place. 423 

— L<ather Sq. — grade established, 103 

— Longwood Ave. — order to set edgestones and pave gutters, 

288, 293 

— Liberty Sq. — revised grade established, 444 

— IJnwood Sq. — order to grade, 309 ; order passed to repair, 444 

— Lamartine St. — order to grade, 309 

— Milk St. — order passed for widening. 83; order passed to 

widen, 160; order passed to raise giade. 327 ; revised grade 
established, 44-1; report accepted for sideM'alk between P. O. 
and Oliver St., 665 

— Mercliant's Row — order passed to pave, 230 

— Magazine St. — order for widening, 488; order to establish 

grade. 533; order passed to widen, 534 

— Moreland St. — release of right of drainage to Saml. Weld and 

others, 151 

— Madison Square — order passed to pay Henry Doherty for 

filling, 230 

— Merrimac St. — order passed to pave, 240 

— Meridian St. — order to pave, 409 

— Milmont St. — repairs authorized, 263 

— Norfolk Ave. — order to set edgestones and macadamize, 217 ; 

repairs authorized, 263 

— North Ave. — grade established, 303 

— Nev/bury St. — order passed to lay plank- walks, 454 

— North St. — order passed to pave, 230 

— Newland St. — order to grade, 309 

— Norfolk St. — leave granted to remove trees, 455 

— Otis St. — order passed to widen, 27 

— Ocean St. — order to establish grade, 454 

— Oliver St. — order passed for extending, 83; right of way to 

A. A. Burrage and heirs of N. Whiting authorized, 295; 
order passed to raise grade, 327 



14 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



— Pcaii St. — order passed for extending. 83; order passed to 

■widen, 160, 259, 5:i2; order passed to raise grade, 327 

— P St. — order to grade from First to Third St., 179 

— Pine St. — order to close for removal of wall, 465 

— Pynchon St. — Metropolitnn R. Co. to remove obstruction on, 

134; order to build retaining wall, and grade, 293 

— Prcscott St — order to set edgestones and macadamize, 217; 

order to gi'ade, 309 

— Park St. — ^Vard 16 — hearing on removal of elm trees, 513 

— Prospect St. — order passed to pave, 230 

— Pleasant St. — order passed to pave, 259 ; order passed to 

widen. 300; order to grade, 309 

— Parker St. — order passed to establish grade, 565 

— Putnam St. — order passed to grade, 250 

— Purchase St. — order to set edgestones and pave sidewalks, 

303 

— Quincy Place — order passed to extend to Pearl Place, 534 

— Regent St. — order to grade, and macadamize, 73 

— Roslin St. — order to establish grade, 454 

— Ruggles St. — order passed to set back fence, 293; grade 

established, 327; order passed for surface drainage, 442; 
order jjassed to grade and i-epair, 444 

— Second St. — order to grade Irom O to P Sts., 179 

— Silver St. — order passed for repairs, 259 

— St. James St. — hearing on removing trees, 531; hearing and 

order passed for removal of elm tree, 545 

— Salem St. — order passed to pave . 2.30 

— Stoughton St. — grade est.ablished, 303; Railroad crossing, 

discussion on. and " order to quit" passed, 495 
■ — Sturgis St. — conveyance of discontinued portion to heirs of 
W. H. Boardman authorized, 534 

— Thorn St. — named, 140 

— Trenton St. — order passed for edgestones, etc., 250 

— Troy St. —order to grade, 103 

— Tremont St. — report and order for removal of sidewalk, 260; 

order discussed and passed, 268; widening of adjacent to 
Common, discussed, 2S3; order passed to remove fence on 
Common, 2Sy; order to pave sidewalk between Ruggles and 
Parker Sts., 430; order passed for repairs bet. Ruggles and 
Parker Sts., 442; order passed to pave sidewalks between 
Parker and Whitney Sts., 535 

— Thomas St. — repairs authorized, 283 

— Tudor St. — order passed to grade, 533; order to establish 

grade, 533 

— Thornton St. — order to establish, grade, 454 

— Vernon St. — repairs authorized, 263 

— Vine St. — leave granted to remove trees, 455 

— Winter St., Ward 16 — leave to withdraw on petition for coast- 

ing, 33 

— M'ashington St. — order for widening discussed and non-con- 

curred in, 112; order passed to jiavo gutters, and set edge- 
stones from River St. to Milton Lower Mills, 196: order for 
widening offered and rejected. 231 ; order passed to widen 
from Boylston to Avery, 268; order passed to pave side- 
walks bet. Eliot Sq. and Pynchon St., 295; order passed to 
remove obstructions, 295 

— Water St. — remonstrance of Reals, Greene & Co. against 

proposed widening upon their estate, 101 ; communication 
from Street Com., 13J; widening, and triangular piece be- 
low new P. O., reports, discussion, and orders passed, 141; 
order passed to widen. 160, 441 ; order passed for further 
widening, and reconsidered, 179; further widening and ex- 
tension discussed, 222; order passed to raise grade, 327; 
revised grade established, 444; order passed to take estate 
of Beals, Greene & Co., 470 

— Woodbine St. — order to macadamize and set edgestones, 179 

— Walnut Ave. — order passed for surface drainage, 419, 429 

— William St. — grade established, and order to grade passed, 187 

— White St. — order passed for edgestones, etc., 250 

— W. Cottage St, — grade established, 303 

— Weston St. — order passed for repairs, 442 

— Waverley St. — order to establish grade, 454 

— Waltham St. — hearing on paving, etc., 240; order passed to 

remove rail tracks, 259; order passed for repairs, 2">9 

— West Chester Park — order passed for extension, 268; order 

passed to remove obstructions before July 23d, 2s)3 

— Warren St. — order to pave, 382 

— Winthrop St. — order to repair, 444 

— Walton St. — order to establish grade, 454 
Suffolk St. District- 
Special Committee appointed, and authorized to exercise 

powers conferred bj' City Council of 1872, 3 
Full powers to joint special committee, 117 
Payment of Commissioners to adjudicate damages, 190 
Committee to report action necessary, 263 
Report on, 548 

Rep't on condition of Suffolk St., Church St., Northampton 
St. and Swett St. improvements accepted, and orders 
passed. 565 
Summer Vacation. 302 
Survey and Inspection of Buildings — see Buildings. 

Taxes- Tax of $8,638,092 for 1873-4, laid, 140 
Order for charge of interest, 26'J 
Order passed for collection of interest, 268 
Ordinance providing for redeeming estates, 383 



Theatres — 

Order for Inspector of Buildings to report precautions taken 

against tire, 13 
Communication from Inspector of Buildings, respecting 

safety from fire, 51 
Orders passed relating to obscene exhibitions, 423 
Report and discussion on immoral exhibitions, 455 
Order to rcn'oke license where immoral exhibitions are per- 
mitted, 467 
Report on immoral exhibitions indefinitely postponed, 535 
Treasurer, City — 

Report com. to examine accounts accepted, 218 
Truant officers — 

Communication from Mayor, of State law placing appoint- 
ment with School Com. 185 

Union Freight Railway Co. — 

Ordered to restrict use of steam, 190 
Unfinished business — Referred to Joint Standing Corns., 10 
Of Joint Standing Committees, referred to next City Coun- 
cil. 575 
Of Standing Committees of Board of Aldermen, referred to 
next Board, 575 

Votes of Thanks — 

To commandants at Navy Yard and Fort Warren, for 
military services at fire. 240 
Voting Lists — (See also Elections) — 

City Clerk authorized to prepare, and employ additional 
assistance, 2J2 

Washington's Birthday — Order passed for observing, 58 
Water Works — Annual report of Wat'-r Board, 51 

Report of Water Board on additional supply of water, 114 
Report of AVater Committee on taking Parker Hill for 

reservoir, 127 
Report recommending loan of $500,000 for supply from Sud- 
bury river, 127 
Parker Hill Reservoir, communication from AVater Board, 132 
Parker Hill Keservoir, remarks of F. O. Prince, attorney for 

owners, 133 
Mayor to petition for reservoir on Parker Hill, 140 
Report inexpedient to obtain supply from Flax Pond for 

ICast Boston, accepted. 151 
Order passed for Water Board to consider expediency of 

removing i^ublic driidiing fountain in State St., 181 
Water Hoard to report in print. 187 
Com. from AVater JJoard for siiecial appropriation of $115,000, 

2U6 
Rueter & Alley allowed to lay pipe in Heath and New Heath 

Sts.. 2!7 
Water Board authorized to purchase Parker Ilill for 

reservoir, 219 
Order for Water Board to report on pipes from Beacon Hill 

Reservoir for use of Fire Dept., 242 
Order to report on expediencj' of building reservoirs, 247 
Order passed for Water Board to report on laying pipes 

from Beacon Hill Reservoir, 217 
Com. from Water Board and City Engineer, relating to 

reservoir, etc., 282 
Water Board and City Engineer on system of pipes and 

hydrants, 3.}0 
Report on Holly system, 371 

Order passed to place reservoirs at junction of streets, 372 
Holly system referred to Water Board. 409 
Order discussed and passed for supply from Sudbury River, 

431 
Order passed for Water Board to report relative to Mystic 

Pond, 443 
Order pas.^ed to obviate delay in outlying wards, 444 
Report and order relative to system of water pipes for 

fires, 454 
Report and order relative to supplying Brookline, 454 
Order passed lor Water Board to coiuract for pipes, etc., 467 
Order passed allowing Brookline to take water from 

Cochituate water pipes, 467 
Order passed for Board to report on condition of Farm 

Pond, 468 
Communication from AVater Board for additional appropri- 
ation, 480 
Board ordered to report in print in relation to additional 

supply, 495 
Order lor taking water from Sudbury River, and land neces- 
sary, referred to next City Council, 675 
Weld, Clifford R., authorized to take birds and eggs for scientific 

purposes. 240 
AVharves- see Fort Hill AVharf. 
AVillard, Arthur AV., authorized to take birds and eggs for 

scientific purposes, 217 

FINAL PROCEEDINGS. 

Resolution of Thanks to Chairman. 577 
Response of Chairman to Resolution of Thanks, 579 
Order passed to print final proceedings, 679 
Adjournment, sine die, 679 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



15 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



OR&AISriZATION AND REGULAR MEETINGS. 

Called to order by senior member, George A. Shaw, 1 

Address of Mr. Shaw, 1 

Credentials of members received, and quorum reported, 1 

Notice to Mayor and Aldermen, of quorum present, 1 

■Convention, and qualiHcation of members, ). 

Edward O. Shepard elected President, 1 

Address of the President, 1 

"Washin9;ton P. Gregg elected Clerk, 2 

Oatlis of office administered to Clerk by City Solicitor, 2 

Notice to Board of Aldermen of organization of Common Coun- 
cil, 2 

Notice from Board of Aldermen of organization of that body, 2 

Thursday evening, half-past seven o'clock, assigned for regular 
meetings, 2 

ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 

Adams, Mr., Ward 14 — Remarks on 

Hook and Ladder House on Dudley and Forest Streets, 330 
Steam-beating apparatus in Engine house. Ward 14, 416 
AVater for Brookline, 487 
Annexation — 

Committee authorized to procure clerical services, surveys, 

and plans. 38 
Brookline, discussion on, 105 

Order passed for printing 10,000 copies of Acts of 1873, 237 
Report of Commission, .358 
Order passed relative to including Chestnut Hill Reservoir 

in limits of Boston, 435 
Discussion on annexation of portion of Brookline, 435, 543 
Discussion on annexation of ijrookline, and reference to next 

City Council, 559 
Discussion on annexation of Wintlirop to Boston, and order 

passed in favor of. 5G9 
Of Chelsea and Revere referred to next City G-ovcrnment, 

571 
Annual reports — 

Superintendents and Boards authorized to present in print, 

10 
Appropriations — 

Orders passed for the Speoiflc Appropriations for the Pinan- 

ci:il rear, 138 
Appropriations — Transfers authorized, viz.: 
510,000 from State Tax to Sewers, 36 
$10,000 from Lamps to Charles River, and Warren Bridges, 

36 
$1,500 each to Contingent Funds of Aldermen and Council, 

and .Toint Committees of Citj' Council, 36 
$15,003 from unexpended balances to (-"ablic Library, 121 
$30,000 " " " '• Fire Department, 121 

$11,000 " " •' " Water Works, 121 

$15,000 " " " " School Committee, 121 

$12,000 " " " " School Instructors, 121 

$50,000 from Atlantic Avenue to extension of South Market 

Street. 144 
$12,000 from Reserved Fund for Hook and Ladder house No. 

4, 237 
$3,000 from Reserved Fund for Hose house corner O and 

Fourth Streets, South Boston, 237 
$5,100 from Reserved Fund for Widening Federal-street 

Bridge, 243 
$18,000 from Reserved Fund for Hook and Ladder Co. 6, 255 
$10,000 for school lot on Quincy Street, 274 
$7,500 from Reserved Fund for Grammar School-house, L 

Street, 390 
$3,500 for completion of Engine house No. 12, 438 
$5,500 from Reserved Fund to appropriations for Markets, 

451 
$5,000 from Reserved Fand for Northampton-street District, 

479 
$30,000 from Reserved Fund to Sewers, 485 
$1,230 " " " " Common, 521 

$1,000 " " '■• " Quarantine, 521 

$25,000 " " " ••' Public Buildings, 557 

$10,000 " " " " Suffolk-street District, 589 

$700 " " " " Church-street District, 569 

$500 from Incidentals to Contingent Expenses Board Alder- 
men, 563 
$11,653 from Reserved Fund to Public Library, 563 
Armories — see Militia. 
Assessors' Department — 

$1,000 additional for clerk hire, 106 



Auditor of Accounts — 

Authorized to transfer appropriations, 59 
Estimates for 1873-74. 95 
Report of Committee on Estimates, 122 

Estimates adopted and orders passed relating to specific Ap- 
propriations for 1873-74, 138 
Order passed for annual report in print, 195 

Badges — Discussion on, 31 

Order passed for committee to provide for Council, 31 

Order passed to procure for officers of Ciiy Government, 50 
Barnes, Mr,, Ward 11 — Remarks on 

Widening of Federal Street, 98 

Widcnmg of Water Street, 123 

Expenditures for Common and Public Grounds, 183 

Columbus Avenue extension, 193,204 

Improvements of Common, 194 

Payment of claims on Swett-street Hospital, 213, 236 

Additional appropriations for Fourth of Jnly, 225 
Baths — see Public Baths. 
BjUs — 

Order passed to place on Primary School-house, Princeton 
Street, 346 
Blackmar, Mr., Ward 11 —Remarks on 

Order relating to small-pox hospital, 6 

Hospital on Swett Street, 14 

Taking old almshouse, Rosbury, for small-pox hospital, 15 

Refreshments, etc., 48 

Salaries of City officers, 86 

Sale of estate taken from O. M. Wheelwright, 99 

Widening of 'W.ater Street, 110, 155, 165 

Primary School-house, Marlboro Street, 136 

The Burrill Claim, 137, 274 

Widening of streets around new P. O., 165 

Improvements of Common and Public Grounds, 194 

Payment of claims on S'.vett-street Hospital, 213, 236 

Yeas and nays in verifying vote, 221 

Reservoir on Parker's Hiil, 255 

Committee on Fire Department visiting steam fire-engine es- 
tablishments, 2.36 

Orders relating to Fire Depai'tment, 244 

Firing cannon on Common, 357 

Reorganization of Fire Department, 392 

Supply of water from Sudbury river, 436 

Revision of City Charter, 452 

Conlirmation of Fire Commissioners, 477 

Washington Park improvements, 497, 499 

Vote of Thanks to President, 571 
Boardman, Mr., Ward 6 — Remai'ks on 

Additional appropriation for Fourth of July, 226 
Boardman, Mr., Ward 14 — Remarks on 

The Burrill Claim. 137 

Widening Water Street, 1.57 
Bonds of City Officers — 

Order passed for annual examination, 243 

Report of annual examination accepted, 274 
Bonds — see Loans. 
Boston and Albany R. R. Co. — 

Mayor authorized to give release from claims for d.amages, 
70 
Boston and Lowell Depot — 

Order passed for City Engineer to inspect arched entrances, 
85 
Boston and Providence R. Co. — 

Discussion on petition and concurrence in leave to with- 
draw, 212 
Bowles, Mr., Ward 12 — remarks on 

Fourth July expenditures, 225 

Orders relating to Fire Dcpt , 244 

Steam-heating apparatus in Engine house. Ward 14, 416 
Brackett, Mr., Ward 10 — remarks on 

Election of George A, Shaw, 70 

Widening of Federal St.. 98 

Widening of Water St., 124 

The Burrill Claim, 136, 2o5, 274 

Ye.ns and Nays in verifying vote, 224 

Additional appropriations for Fourth July, 226 

Purchase of steam fire engines, 265 

Salaries of teachers in Normal School, 298 

Music on Common. 299 

Reorganization of Fire Dept., 381, 390, 424 

Annexation of portion of Brookline, 435, 560 

Revision of City Charter, 438, 452 

Confirmation of Fire Commissioners, 478 



16 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



Soup for the Poor, 487, 525 

Religious instruction in Public Institutions, 557 

Vote of Thanks to President. 572 
Bicknell, Mr., Ward 4 — remarks on 

Partition in Committee room, City Hall, 29 

Election of George A. Shaw, 61 

Steam-heating apparatus in Engine house, "Ward 14, 416, 426 
Bridges — 

Charles-river and Warren, report of commissioners, 30 

West Boston and Cragie's, order passed to petition for 
authority to reconstruct and widen, 59 

Chelsea St., rebuilding authorized, 175 

Order passed to remove foot bridges over Bost. and Prov. 
K. K., 224 

Removal of foot bridges over Providence R. R., 2G5 

Eastern Ave., order passed to ascertain character of founda- 
tions, 450 

Broadway, repairs authorized, 543 
Builoings — 

Order passed not to grant permits in Water St., 6 

Order passed in relation to water pipes freezing, 31 

Application to General Court in i-egard to height of build- 
ings, 36 

Report and order relative to fire escapes, 99 

Order passed for examinations relative to fire escapes, 106 

Discussion and order passed revoking permits to build on 
westerly side of Kingston St., 154 

Com. authorized to employ clerical assistance, 175 

Order passed for Inspector to report best mode of preserving 
certain buildings from fire, 194 

Order passed for printing digest of laws and ordinances, 253 

Orders passed authorizing repairs on fire-alarm apparatus. 285 

$654.87 allowed for removing unsafe walls after fire of May 
30, 286 

Com. authorized to grant permits during recess of Council, 
296 

Order passed for add'l clerical assistance in office of Survey 
and Inspection of Buildmgs, 557 

Reports inexpedient, and no action necessary on several 
subjects, 556 
Burditt. Mr., Ward 16 — remarks on 

Widening of Federal St., 86. 98 

Widening of Water St., 124 

Columbus Ave. extension, 192, 205 

Additional appropriation for Fourth of July, 225 

Music on Common. 299 

Fort Hill Wharf property, 348 

Sale of old Mather School-house, 358, 417 

Soup for the Poor, 526 

Additional .ippropriation for Public Library, 570 
Burt, Mr., Ward 16 — remarks on 

Purchasing estate of Nath. Whiting for Engine house, 255 

Transfer offence to Mt. Hope, 329 

Allowance to James S. King. 348 

Organization of Engine Co. No. 25, 357 

Caton, Mr., Ward 11 — remarks on 

Division of Committee-room. City Hall, 39 

Improvements of Common, 194 

Columbus Ave. extension, 204 

Accommodations for Insurance Brigade, 285 

Enlargement of City Hall, 286 

Enlargement of Quincy Market, 299 

Music on Common, 299 

Stand-pipe in City Hall, 346 

Sale of old Mather School-house, 348, 417 

Steam-heating apparatus in Engine house. Ward 14, 416 

Organizing Co. for Engine No 24, 449 

Repairs of Minot School-house, 497 
Cemeteries — 

Mt. Hope, trustees elected, 29 

interest authorized on deposits, 182 

annual report of trustees, 226 

appropriation charged with expcnseof movingfence, 346 

Census — 

Com. on Printing to take charge of statistics, 121 
City and County Treasurer — see Treasury Department. 
City Charter — 

Discussion on revision of, 2.34, 436, 451 

Report and order relating to revision, recommitted, 356 

Notice of appointment of Commissioners for revising, 497 
City Council — 

Order passed to prepare index to volumes of proceedings for 
1869-'70-'71-'72. 61 

Order passed to advertise for proposals for reporting and 
publishing an abstract of proceedings, 214 

Order passed- for Index to volume of proceedings for 1873, 559 
City Documents — 

Order passed for City Messenger to prepare Index, at 
expense of $150, and supply bound sot of Documents 
to each member of Council, 571 
City Hall — sec Public Buildings. 
City Hospital — Monthly report, 147 

Ordinance to amend ordinance relating to, indefinitely post- 
poi ed, 185 
City Surveyor — 

Order passed for purchase of supplies, instruments, and 
materials, and other expenses, 274 



Claims — 

Order passed to pay Louis Frazier $1,000 for injuries, 31 

Report leave to withdraw on pet'n of Currier, Trott & Co. 
and others for damages at great fire accepted, 38 

Recommitment of report leave to withdraw on pet'ns Smith 
& McGaragle, and Holohan & Maguire, S6 

Order passed authorizing Mayor to draw for payment of 
judgments of court, etc., 122 

Discussion on the Burrill Claim, 136 

Order passed to pay certain persons connected with City 
government, 138 

Burrill claim, leave to withdraw, 144 

Discussion on payment of Hololian & Maguire and Wm. 
Smith & Co., 212 

Reports on Burrill Claim, 214 

Order passed for transfer of insurance to Wm. Smith & Co., 
236; reconsideration discussed and rejected, 236 

Debate on the Burrill Cl.aim, 265, 274 

Order passed for enforcement of insurance claims, 329 

Order for paying excess of insurance to Smith & McGaragle 
indefinitely postponed. 571 
Clocks — Order passed for clock on Ticknor School-house, 243 

Report inexpedient to erect a clock-tower on Ticknor School- 
house, 285 

Report inexpedient to erect clock on tower of Ticknor 
School-house recommitted, 296 
Common and Public Grounds — 

Order passed to pay Supt. $500, 167 

$15,000 authorized, 175 

Order and discussion on assistants to Supt., 175 

Order for tool-house and other expenditures discussed, 182 

Report on expenditures for improvements, 193 

Discussion and order passed authorizing building of Tool- 
house, and other improvements, 194 

Pet'n of P. H. Rogers and 108 others, relative to Madison 
Sq., 203 

Order passed for improvements of Independence Square, 
214 

Leave to withdraw on pet'n Beacon Base Ball Club, 216 

Order passed for erection of fence, and improvements of 
square. Commonwealth Ave., 235 

Madison Square, order passed for grading and erecting 
fence, 235 

Order passed for watering streets, 243 

$746.98 allowed to Henry Doherty, for earth settling on 
Madison Square, 2-13 

Order passed for removal of fence from Common, 287; to 
Mt. Hope Cemetery, 329 

Discussion on cannon firing, minority report substituted and 
accepted, 347 

Discussion on firing cannon, and amended order passed, 357 

$2,000 authorized for So. Boston squares, 376 

$4,730 authorized for labor and team-work, 376 

$4,500 authorized for Orchard Sq., 378 

$1,200 authorized for fences. 376 

$200 authorized for wagon-shed, and tool-house on Common, 
376 

Washington Park, order passed for grading and improving, 
425 

Discussion on laying out a PuhlicPark. and order passed, 462 

Joint Special Committee on Public Works appointed, 479 

Order passed authorizing lease of greenhouse, 485 

Request for add'l appropriation. 485 

Washington Park, discussion on improvements, 497 

$75 add'l for tool-house, etc., on Common, 498 

Washington Park, discussion on, and order passed to pay 
$1,100 for improvements, 498 

$225 for watering streets and public grounds, 509 

Personal explanation of Mr. Shaw on Washington Park im- 
provements, 509 
Common Council — Journal, order passed for preparing and 
printing, 2 

Request to appoint members Special Police, 31 

Order passed excluding persons from coat-room, 124 

Discussion on infringement of dignity, 256 

Resolutions and action on death of Thomas H. Doherty, 324 

Report and order for providing new desks, etc., 450 

Order passed authorizing new platforms and desks, 462 

Order passed to provide new carpeting. 570 

Order passed to pay Clerk $500 for extra services, in pre- 
paring Journal, 571 
Contingent expenses — 

President authorized to approve bills, 39 
County of Suffolk — (sec also Treasury Department) 

Order prss^d authorizing $10,000 for repairs and furniture 
for Court House and Probate building. 155 

Report of Treasurer for financial year, iOS 

Order passed for $3,000 additional for re]>airs of Jail, 237 

Order passed for repairs of Court House and Probate build- 
ing, 346 

Order passed for $800 additional for fitting up Municipal 
Court Room, Soutliern District, 462 
Cudworth, Mr.. Ward 11, — remarks on 

Opening Public Library on Sunday, 37, 47 

Dacey, Mr., Ward 2 — remarks on 

Nomination of ensineers of Fire Department. 87 
The Burrill claim';^ 137, 265 



IXDKX TO PUOCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUxXCIL. 



17 



Assistant to Supt. Common, 17-3 

Salaries of oflicors in I^aw Department, 17G, 185 

Ordinance relating to City Hospital, 185 

Additional appropriations for Fourth July, 225 

Com. of Fire Department visiting Steam fire engine estab- 
lishments, 230 

Accommodations for Insurance Brigade, 285 

Death of Thomas H. Dohorty, 324 

Cannon firing on Common, 347, 357 

Reorganization of Fire Department, 364, 380, 390 

Revision of City Charter, 451 

A Public Park, 4C3 

Washington Park improvements, 499 

Soup for the Poor, 521 

Religious instruction in Public Institutions, 557 
Davis, Mr., Ward 14 — remarks on 

Enlargement of City Hall, 288 

Market leases, 417 

Organizing company for Engiije lio. 24, 449 
Dean, Mr., Ward 12 — remarks on 

Order relating to small-pox hospital, 6 

Hospital on Swett Street, 14 

'Taking old .almshouse, Roxbury, for small-pox hospital, 14 

Resolve requesting Board of Health to apply for needed 
powers, 15 

Opening Public Library on Sundays, 37 

Refreshments, etc., 48, 59 

Election of George A. Shaw, 61, 70 

Carriage hire, 69 

Inspection of ai'chways Boston and Lowell Depot, 85 

Widening of Federal" Street, 86 

Nomination of Engineers of Fire Department, 87 

Annex.ation of Brookline, 104, 559 

Election of Director of Public Institutions, 121 

Widening of Water Street, 145, 155, 165 

Time for Annual Report of Fire Department, 154 

Widening of streets around now P. O., 164 

Amending ordinance relating to City Hospital, 175 

Third assistant in Law Department, 176 

Salaries in Law Department, 176. 185, 257 

Expenditures for Common and Public Grounds, 183 

New Police Station in South Boston, 185 

Columbus Avenue extension, 192 

Petition of Boston and Providence Railroad Co., 212 

Payment of claims on Swett Street Hospital, 213 

Teas and nays in verifying vote, 224. 226, 2-36 

Additional appropriations for July Fourth, 223 

Revision of City Chai-ter, 234, 437 

Com. of Fire Department visiting Steam fire engine estab- 
lishments, 236 

Orders relating to Fire Department. 244 

Purchase of Steam fire en.f^ines, 254 

South Boston Flats, 207, 275 

The Burrill Claim, 274 

Accommodations for Insurance Brigade, 285 

Firing Cannon on the Common, 357 

Prote'ction of City Hall, 362 

Reorganization of Fire Department, 304, 379, 390, 396, 424, 
440 

Repairs of Steam Fire engine No. 8, 375 

Steam-heating apparatus in Engine house, Ward 14. 416 

A Police Commission, 417 

Organizing Co. for Engine No. 24, 449 , • 

Open records for Fire Department. 450 

Management of fires, 450 

Revision of City Charter, 452 

Salaries of Fire Commissioners, 461 

Report of Committee on Legislative matters, 510-512, 521 

Soup for the Poor, 524, 558 

Duties of Fire Commissioners. 539 

Change of boundary between Boston and BrookUne, 543 

Religious Instruction in Public Institutions, 556 

Annexation of Wintlirop, 569 

Vote of Thank* to President, 571 

Denny, Mr., Ward 9 — remarks on 

Resolve requesting Board of Healtli to apply for needed 
powers, 15 

The Badge question, 31 

Opening Public Library on Sundaj', 36, 37 

Refreshments, etc., 48 

Admission to Lunatic Hospital, South Boston, 59 

Widening Federal Street, 85 

Assistant to Supt. Common, 175 

Salaries of officers in Law Department, 176, 185 

Columbus Ave. extension, 192, 205 

Petition of Boston andProv. R.R. Co., 212 

Payment of claims of Swett Street Hospital, 213, 253 

Additional appropriation for Fourth of July, 225 

Reservoir on Parker's Hill, 235 

Com. of Fire Department visiting Steam fire engine estab- 
lishments, 224, 236 

Infringement of dignity of Council, 236 

Purchase of Steam fire engines, 264 

Extending Lafayette Court and Hayward Place, 297 

Com. on reorganization of Fire Department visiting other 
cities, 298 

Mason Street Engine house, 331 

Reorganization of Fire Department, 362, 380, 396, 439 



Hook and Ladder house on Dudley and Forest Streets, 390 

Steam lieating apparatus in Engine house. Ward 14, 416 

Annexation of portion of Brookline, 435 

Revision of City Charter, 437 

Salaries of Fire Commissioners, 460 

Salaries of permanent firemen, 476 

Confirmation of Fire Commissioners, 477 

Soup for the Poor, 487, 525, 558 

Washington Park improvements, 499 

Vote of Thanks to President, 571 

East Boston Railroad Co. — 

Act of incorporation accepted, 460 
Elections — 

Order passed relative to transfer of Voting Lists, etc., to 
registrars, 571 
Elections, municipal — 

Reports accepted on recount of votes in Wards 3 and 5, 5 

Report on returns in Ward 2 accepted, 17 

Ward 15, report of recount accepted, 37 

Of Geo. A. Shaw and John W. Mahan, committee author- 
ized to report in print. 38 

Report of Committee on election of Geo. A. Shaw, 49 

Substitute oft'ored in case of Geo. A. Shaw, 61 

John W. Mahan, report accepted, 61 

Discussion on election of Geo. A. Shaw, 70 

Ferries — 

Order passed for new boat -and houses, 164 

Order passed to pay for coal furnished, 214 

Annual report of Directors, 243 

Oi'der passed authorizing new drops to be paved, 357 

Report on free passes to police, 426 

Order passed to furnish passes to police, 438 

Sale of ferry-boat Jefterson authorized, 460 

Order passed relative to extending time to take land, etc.. 
476 

$3,000 for finishing and furnishing new ferry-boat Wintlirop, 
490 
Fire Alarms — 

Care of bells, clocks, and control of appropriation vested in 
committee on, 29 

Order passed for placing tower and alarm on I'rescott 
Scbool-bonse, 224 
Fire Department — 

Order passed to pay John Donelly $150 for use of horse and 
wagon at fire, Nov. 10, 31 

Order passed to pay Atlantic Works, $4,646.69 for extra 
work on fire-boat. 37 

Order passed authorizing the purchase of hay, grain, horses, 
and supplies. 37 

Order passed authorizing repairs on engines, etc., 37 

Order passed to pay steam-tug Louis Osborn $1,940 for ser- 
vices at fire Nov. 9. 47 

$1,100 appropriated for 25 fire-extinguishers, 59 

Order passed to pay James Mnnroe $34.50 for services, 59 

Resolution of sympathy with families of firemen killed, and 
with those injured in fire on Hanover Street, 87 

Nomination of engineers discussed, and committee for .ap- 
pointed. 87 

Report .and order passed to locate Steam fire-engine in 
Northampton Street, 99 

Order passed relating to relief of families of disabled fire- 
men, 105 

Invitation accepted to view swift connecting fire pipe, 106 

Request for additional appropriation. 108 

Report on increasing efliciency of, 108 

Order passed for rep.air of fire reservoir, cor. Washington 
and Warren Streets. 122 

$1,-300 for additional assistants, 122 

Ordinance passed extending time for electing Secretary of 
Engineers, 124 

Order passed autliorizing Chief Engineer to report before 
March 27, 124 

.$820.50 to pay for 600 feet of hose for Chelsea Department, 
148 

Order passed to pay Wm. Gilchrist $1,000 for Engine No. 
12. 148 

Discussion on time for annual report, 154 

Order passed relating to time of annual report, 159 

Order passed to purchase self-acting fire-engine, 167 

Memorial relating to Chief Engineer, 167 

Order passed for repairs and alterations on Hose house No. 
4, Northampton Street, 168 

Chief Engineer authorized to employ assistance, 168 

Order passed for additional assistance in office of Chief En- 
gineer, 175 

10,000 feet new hose authorized, 182 

Order passed to pay Gersliom Sherman and Eben Witherell 
for personal injuries, 204 

Report on Horse Hose-carriage in Longwood, 204 

Order passed authorizing committee to visit engine estab- 
lishments, 224 

Order passed for committee to investigate cause of fire May 
30, 234 

Order reconsidered, discussed, and passed authorizing com- 
mittee to visit steam fire-engine establishments, 236 

Discussion on orders relating to, 244 



18 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



. Order passed for Committee on Reorganization, 244 

Oi'der passed rescinding order approved June 6,1873, re- 
questing investigation of fire of 30th May, 245 

Order passed for investigation of cruise of fire of May 30, 
and report in print, 250 

Order passed autliorizing Horse Hose Company to be estab- 
lished for Hose carriage No. 12, 253 

Order passed authorizing Joint Special Committee to send 
for persons and papers, and employ stenographic re- 
porter, 257 

Petitions for reorganization presented fi'om 3,000 citizens, 
253 

Oi'der passed authorizing hose carriages to be substituted 
for the tenders of steamers, 264 

Discussion and order ijassed for purchasing four Steam fire- 
engines, five Horse hose-carriages, and one Hook and 
Ladder tiuck, 2G4 

Order passed authorizing notices of location of fire-alarm 
signal boxes to be distributed, 274 

Order passed for Horse Hose carriage, Engine house ^o. 20, 
274 

Order passed authorizing extension of flre-alarm lines, 
painting poles, etc., 285 

Order passed authorizing repairs on fire-alarm apii.iratus, 
285 

Report on Mason-slrcct Engine house, etc., 285 

Discussion on furnishing accommodation for Insurance Bri- 
gade, 285 

Hook and Ladder Co. 1. pcrn'iit to leave the city, 296 

Ordinance passed in relation to Fire Department, 290 

Engine house No. 10, repairs of cellar authorized, 290 

Discussion and order passed authorizing committee on reor- 
ganization to visit other cities, 297 

Order passed to repair and alter fire-boat, 298 

Order passed authorizing organization and equipment of 
Fire Engine Co. 22, Parker Street, 329 

Report on fire departments of dift'erent cities, 320 

Request for extra appropriation for Engine house, etc., on 
Fort Hill territory, 331 

Reports on reorganization of, 332 

Reports on cause of fire of May 30, 1873, 335 

Minority report on reorganization, 347 

Order passed to pay James S. King $.300 for personal inju- 
ries, 318 

Order passed authorizing new alarm-repeater for central 
oflace, 356 

Order passed for organization Engine Co. No. 2o, .3.57 

Discussion on payment of $],.50u for repairs on Engine No. 
8, 375 

Order passed for fire reservoirs, 376 

$1,500 authorized for repair on Steam Fire Engine No. S, 
390 

$1,450 authorized for repairs on Steam Fire Engine No. 15, 
390 

Order passed for reorganization of Engine Companies 4 and 
7, 390 

Order passed authorizing exhibition of fire apparatus of 
Sam. R. Russell, 390 

Report on reorg.ini zation recommitted, with instructions, 
417 

Order passed for Water Board to consider Holly systetn, 417 

Order reconsidered for exhibition of -water system by S. R. 
Russell, and indefinitely postponed, 417 

Report of amended ordinance, and discussion on Fire Com- 
mission, 424 

Discussion on furnishing steam-heating apparatus for En- 
gine house in Ward 14, 426 

Discussion on reorganization, 256, 302, 376, .390, 438 

Order passed to allow John A. Fynes $50 for personal inju- 
ries, 449 

Discussion and order passed to organize company for En- 
gine 24, 449 

Ordinance amended providing that records be public, 450 

Discussion on management at fires, 450 

Discussion on confirmation of Fire Commissioners. 477 

Order passed for purchase of HoUoway's self-acting chemi- 
cal engine, 485 

First Monthly Report of Fire Commissioners, 521 

Discussion on duties of Fire Commissioners, and reference 
to next City Council, 539 

Order passed in relation to Fire-Alarm Telegraph, 542 

Order passed to pay J. A. & W. Bird & Co., for paint fur- 
nished in Firc-Alarm Department, 557 

Order passed to p.ay A. Bird for paints, painting, and carting 
for Fire-Alarm Department, 557 
Fireworks — Notice of petition to Legislature, 285 
Fort Hill Wharf— 

Order passed to pay Wm. R. Clark $160,000 for estate on 
Broad St., .329 

Discussion on order for payment of $160,000 to W. R. Clark, 
348 

Order passed for conveyance to City subject to mortgage, 381 
Fourth July — Discussion on celebrating, 157 

$15,000 appropriated, and Committee of Arrangements ap- 
pointed, 193 

Discussion on additional appropriation of $5000, 225 

Order for additional appropriation rejected, 235 



Flynn, Mr., Ward 7 — remarks on 

Taking old almshouse, Roxbui'y, for Small-pox hospital, 14 
Resolve requesting Board of Health to apply for needed 

powers, 15 
Partition in Committee room. City Hall, 29, 39 
The Badge question, 31 
Refreshments, etc., 47, 48, 59 

Transferring power over erection of stables to City Council, 61 
Widening of Federal St., 86, 97 
Salaries of city oflicers, 86 
Nomination of engineers of Fire Dept., 87 
Annexation of Brookline, 104 
Widening of Water St., 110, 123, 158, 165 
Primary School-house, Marlboro' St., 136 > 

The Burrill Claim, 137, 266 
Burnt District Loan, 137 
Widening of streets around new P. O., 164 
Construction of bath-house at Mt. Wash. Ave. Bridge, 182 
Columbus Ave. extension, 192, 204 
Fourth of July expenditures, 167, 193, 225 
Improvement of Madison Square, 203 
Payment of claims on Swett St. Hospital, 213 
Revision of City Charter, 234 
Ordei'S relating to Fire Department, 244 
Infringement of dignity of Council, 256 
Purchasing estate of Nath. Whiting for Engine house, 256 
Extending Fayettp Court, and Hayward Place, 296 
Disposal of Swett St. Bospital, 297 
Hiring part of Niles Block, 297 
Purchase of Fort Hill Wharf, 329 
Rebuilding Washington St., 331 

Office .accommodations for Directors Public Institutions, 356 
Reorganization of Fire Dept., 390, 425, 439 
Steam-heating apparatus in Engine house. Ward 14, 416 
A Police Commission, 417 
Annexation of portion of Brookline, 435, 443 
Organizing Co. for Engine No. 24, 449 
Management of Fires, 451 
Confirmation of Fire Commissioners, 477 
Soup for the Poor. 478, 540 
Religious Instruction in Pub. Institutions, 556 
Annexation of Winthrop, 569 
Vote of Thanks to President, 572 

G. A. R.— 

Order passed allowing each Post $200 for Decoration Day, 

168, 175 
Invitation accepted from Post 26 for Decoration Day, 184 
Invitation of Post 7 to attend dedication of Monument, 
accepted, 424 
Gas — 

Order passed to pay for balloon gas on July 4th, 446 
Order passed relative to requiring laying pipes and furnish- 
ing gas, 449 

Hall, Mr., Ward 10 — remarks on 

Widening of Federal St., 98 
Harbor — 

Report and order passed to pay the State $71,837.83 for 

Atl.antic Ave., 184 
Order passed for report on taking gravel from Long Island, 

426 
Removal of gravel referred to next City Council, 569 
Harrington, Mr., Ward 8 — remarks on 
Widening of Federal St., 86 
The Burrill Claim, 137. 266 

Additional appropriation for Fourth of July, 225 
Steam-heating apparatus in Engine house, No. 14, 416 
A Police Commission, 417 
Health, Board of— 

Ordinance passed not to engage in other business, 5 ' 

Appointments made, 14 

Requested to apply to City Council for any additional power 

or facilities needed, 15 
Notice of organization, 17 

Expenses incurred by, chargeable to what appropriations, 29 
Health — 

Superintendent authorized to make contracts for horses and 

materials, 37 
Order passed to pay Assistant Port Physician $700 for extra 

services, 50 
Supt. authorized to employ clerical assistants. 69 
Ordinance passed to amend ordinance relating to ijublic 

health, 96 
Order passed for examination of present system of sewerage, 

287 
Ordinance passed in regard to removal of manure from 

stables, 416 
Contract authorized for removal of house offal, E. Boston, 559 
Holmes, Mr., Ward 6 — remarks on rules and orders, 5 
Opening Public Library on Sunday, 36, 37 
Election of George A. Shaw, 70 
Sale of estate taken from C. M. Wheelwright, 99 
Site of Primary School-house, Marlborough St., 135 
The Burrill Claim, 137 
Salaries in Law Dept., 185 

Payment of claims on Swett Street Hospital, 213 
Revision of City Charter, 234, 451 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



19 



Salaries of teachers in Normal School, 298 
School-house cor. of Newbury and Exeter Sts., 347 
A Public Park, 463 

Home for the Poor — sec Public Institutions. 

Hospitals — sec Small-po.x, also City Hospital. 

Inspection of Buildings — see Buildings. 

Jones, Mr., Ward 14 — remarks on 

Inspection of archways, Host. & Lowell Depot, 85 

Nomination of engineers of Fire Dept., 87 

Time for annual report Fire Dept., 1S4 

Reservoir on Parker's Hill, 235 

Com. of Fire Dept. visiting Steam fire engine establishments, 

236 
Orders relating to Fire Dept., 244 
Com. to investigate fire of May 30, 245 
Purchasing estate of Nath. Whiting for engine house, 255 
Reorganization of Fire Dept., 256, 393 
Purchase of steam fire engines, 264 
-Vccommodations for Insurance Brigade, 285 
Extending Fayette Court and Hay ward Place, 296 
Com. on reorganization of Fire Dept. visiting other cities, 

298 
Salaries of teachers in Normal School, 293 
Mason Street Engine house, 331 
Repairs of Steam Fire Engine No. 8, 075 
Annexation of portion of Brookline, 435, 453, 559 
Organizing Co. for Engine No. 24, 449 
Management of tires, 451 
Salaries of Fire Commissioners, 461 
Salaries of permanent firemen, 476 
Confirmation of Fire Commissioners, 479 
AVashington Park improvements, 499 

Kelley. Mr., Ward 15 — remarks on 

Order relating to small-po.\ hospital, 6 
Improvement of Madison Square, 203 

Lands — see Public Lands. 
Law Department — 

Communication from City Solicitor in regard to destruction 

of buildings at fires, 38 
Communication of City Solicitor on election of Geo. A. Shaw, 

50 
Communication from Mayor, relating to additional assist- 
ance, 138 
Ordinance passed for third Assistant, 175 
Majority and minority reports on Mayor's recommendation 

of increase of compensation, 176 
Communication from Solicitor relating to Normal School, 

184 
Ordinance passed relating to deeds, 390 
Legislative Matters — 

Order passed for Committee to report in print, 464 
Discussion on report of Committee, 510 
Loans — order for Summer St. Fire Loan introduced, 31 
$3,000 for Engine House No. 12, 37 
$5,000,000 for Summer St. Fire Loai.i, 37 
$2,000,000 to Burnt District. 47 
$10,000 for Engine House, Wd. 14, 69 
$2,000,000 additional for Burnt Dist. discussed, 137 
Burnt District consolidated, 147 

$500,000 for supply of water from Sudbui'y River. 155 
Order passed to pay $4,362.69 for final expenses of Loan 

Commission, 169 
$2-3,000 for rebuilding Chelsea St. Bridge, 175 
$60,000 for Pi'imary school lot, Newbury and Exeter Sts., 

182 
$275,000 for Sulfolk St. District, 182 
$4,000,000 in anticipation of taxes, 184 
$20,000 for school-house, Dudley Dist., 192 
$115,000 for w.ater pipes. Wards 13, 14; 15, 16, 235 
$161,000 for Parker Hill reservoir, 235 
$45,000 for police station house. Fourth St., 237 
$28,000 for enafine house, Longwood, 243 
$.50,000 lor engine house. Fort Hill, 265 
$105,000 for school-house, Houghton Place, 274 
$40,000 for extension of Columbus Ave., 274 
$85,000 for Stable on Highland St., 274 
$250,000 for widening W.ashington and Essex Sts., 287 
$15,000 for engine house. Fort Hill territory, 331 
$40,000 for Dorchester Police station house, 331 
$110,000 for Fort Hill wharf, 329 
$175,000 for Water Works, 542 
$75,000 for Home for Poor, .542 
Loriug, Mr., Ward 12 — remarks on 

Admission to Lunatic Hosp., So. B., 59 
Widening of Federal St., 97 
Sale of estate taken from C. M. Wheelwright, 99 
Annexation of Brookline, 104 
Firing cannon on the Common, 357 
Protection of City Hall, 362 
Laying out streets on new lands, 376 
Reorganization of Fire Dept., -396 
Soup for the Poor, 524, 541 
Lowell R. R. Depot — 

Report of City Engineer on arched entrances, 155 



Mahan, Mr., Ward 5, remarks on 

Taking old almshouse, Roxbury, fin- small-pox hospital, 14 
Inspection of archways to Boston and Lowell depot, 85 
Nomination of engineers of Fire Dept., 87 
Widening of streets .around now P. O., 138, 165 
Salaries of officers in Law Dept., 177, 185 
Small-pox hospital claims, 237 
Orders relating to Fire Dept., 245 
Infringement of dignity of Council, 2.56 
Reorganization of Fire Dept.. 2.56. 392, 439 
Coufirmation of Fire Commissioners, 477 
McCue, Mr., Ward 5, remarks on 

Washington Park improvements, 499 
Magazine St., District — 

Report on additional legislation, 497 
Markets — 

Quincy Market, order for enlargement of indefinitely post- 
poned, 299 
Mayor — 

Order requesting copy of Inaugural Address for printing, 2 
Address referred to special committee. 2 
Report on disposition of topics in Inaugural Address, IS 
Resignation accepted, 496 
Mayor — communications from, viz. : — 
In regard to small-pox hospital, 4 

Relating to appointment of Board of Health, etc.. 14 ' 

Relating to additional assistance in Law Dept., 138 
Veto of order for Normal School accommodations, 183 
Relating to death of Thomas H. Doherty, 324 
Militia — 

First Reg., rent of headquarters transferred, 376 

Co. D, $1,200 for rent of armory, 376 

Co. F, report leave to withdraw on petition for new 

armory. 184 

$450 for repairing and furnishing armory, 438 

order passed for transfer of rent of armory, 496 

Co. I, $575 for rent of armory, 376 

Co. K, $72.53 for repairs of armory, 438 

First Bat. Inf , Co. A, $600 for rent of armory, 148 

Amendment to order on discontinuance of rent o f 

armorj', 175 

Co. B, order passed for transfer of rent from Williams 

Hall to Minot Hall, 298 

Co. D, order passed fur transfer of rent from Williams 

Hall to Minot Hall. 298 

Co.E, order passed to discontinue rent of armory, 485 

Ninth Reg., $600 for rent of armory. 370 

$375 for fitting up head-quarters, 438 

order passed to reimbui'se Capt. Dunn §48. -!6 for per- 
sonal expenses. 485 

order passed to repair and furnish head-quarters, 485 

Co. A, order rescinding allowance for armory, 105 

order to Jjay $600 per annum for rent of armory, 106 

$300 for repairing and furnishing armory, 106 

Leave to withdraw on petition for increase of rent 

for armory, 159 

order passed for repairs of armory, 167 

order passed to pay for rent of armory, 569 

Co. B, order passed to pay $600 jier annum for armory 

237 

Co. C, order for repairs of armory, 175 

Co. E, order for repairs of armory. 175 

Co. I, $1.2)0 for rent of armory, 376 

orders passed for rent, repairs and furnishing of 

armory, 462 

orAer passed to repair and furnish armory, 569 

Co. K. repairs of armory authorized, 38 

order passed to pay $70.70 for repairing and fur- 
nishing armory, 106 
First Co. Cadets, $1,200 for rent of armory, 438 
First Bat. Light An., order passed to furnish head-quarters, 
569 

Co. A, order passed to repair and furnish armory, 485 

Co. B, $4.50 for repairing and furnishing armory, 332 

First Bat. Cav.. order pa.ssed to rent and fix up head- 
quarters, 184 

Co. D, order passed for repairs of armory, 557 

Report and order passed to establish regimental ar- 
mories, 435 

order passed to report changes necessary in allowance 

for rent of armories. 253 
Minors — regulation of sales by, 23 
Mount Hope — see Cemeteries. 

Municipal Register, order passed for preparing and printing, 2 
Music — order passed to procure seven music-stands, 203 
Committee appointed to arrange for music, 243 
Order passed appropriating $2,000, 299 
$100 additional for music stands, 462 

Northampton St. Dist. — 

Amendment passed requiring owners to raise grade, 69 

Remonstrance from Edvv. I. Brown, 69 

Order passed to pet'n for power to perfect drainage, 148 

Order passed directing owners to raise grade, 329 
Nuisances — 

Report (inexpedient) accepted relating to, between Tre- 
mont, Parker, Ruggles and Prentiss Sts., 274 

Stony Brook, order passed for abatement of, 299 



20 



INDEX TO PKOCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



Overseers of Poor — Kequcst for additional appropriation, 155 

Page, Mr., Wai-d 9 — remarks on 

Sale of estate taken from C. M. Wheelwriglit, 99 

Widening of Water St., j23, 147, 15.5, 166 

Columbus Ave. extension, 204 

Keorganization of Fire Dept., 250 

Enlargement of City Hall, 286 

Music on Common, 290 

School-house cor. Newbury and Exeter Sts., 347 

Office accommodations for Directors Public Institutions, 356 

Engine house. Mason St., 426 

Revision of City Charter, 452 

Religious Instruction in Public Institutions, 556 
Pease, Mr., Ward 1 — remarks on the Badge question, 31 

Opening Public Library on Sunday. 3b, 37 

Refreshments, etc., 47 

Inspection of ai-ohways, Bost. & Lowell depot, S5 

Widening of Chatincy St., 85 

Widening of Water St., 110, 124 

xVssistant to Supt. Common, 175 

Fourth of July expenditures, 193, 22a 

Improvements of Common and Public Grounds, 194 

Pet'n of Bost. & Prov. R. Co.. 212 

Payment of claims on Swctt Street Hospital, 213 

Authoi'izing com. to visit engine establishments, 224 

Fourth of July n])propnation, 226 

Reservoir on Parker's Hill, 235 

Reorganization of Fire Dept., 2.56, 305, S96, 438 

Purchase of Steam lire engines, 265 

Accommodations for Insurance Brigade, 286 

Summer vacation, 299 

Repairs of Steam Fire Engine No. 8. 375 

Taking gravel from Long Island. 427 

Supply of water from Sudbury River, 436 

Salaries of Fire Commissioners, 460 

A Public Park. 463 

Salaries of permanent firemen, 476 

Water for Brookline, 4S7 
Perkins. Mr., Ward 6 — remarks on rules and orders, 4 

Health Commissioners engaging in other business, 5 

Permits to build in Water St., 

Hospital on Swett St., 14 

Taking old almshouse, Roxbury, for hospital, 14 

The Badge question, 31 

Opening Public Library on Sunday, 36, 37 

Refreshments, etc., 47 

Admission to Lunatic Hosp., So. Bost., 59 

Election of George A. Shaw. 61 

Inspection of archways Bost. & Lowell Depot, 85 

Widening of Chauncy St., 85 

Widening of l<'ederal St., 85, 97 

Salarj' of city officers. 86 

Widening of Water St., 110, 123, 144, 158, 165 

Annexation of Brookline. 104 

Site of Primary School-house. Marlborough St., 135 

The Bnrrill Claim, 137. 265, 274 

Northampton St. District, 148 

Permits to build on Kingston St., 154 

Widening of streets around new Post Office, 164 

Fourth oir July. 167 

Pet'n of Bost. & Prov. R. Co.. 212 

Payment of claims on Swett-St. Hosp., 213, 237, 253 

Base Ball question, 216 

Decision (in the chair) on Yeas and Nays in verifying vote, 
224, 226 

Revision of City Charter, 234, 438, 451 

Com. of Fire Dept. visiting Steam Fire Engine establish- 
ments, 236 

Purchasing estate of Nath. Whiting for engine house, 255 

Reorganization of Fire Dept., 256, 380, 425, 438 

Salaries in Law Department, 257 

Purchase of Steam lire engines, 265 

So. Bost. Flats. 275 

Extending Fayette Court and Hayward Place, 296 

Disposal of Swett St. Hospital, 297 

Com. on Reorganization of Fire Dept. visiting other cities, 
297 

Sal.aries of teachers in Normal School, 298 

Enlargement of Quincy Market, 299 

Music on Common, 299 

Slimmer vacation, 299 

Purchase of Fort Hill Wlif., 329 

Rebuilding Washington St., 331, 362 

Firing cannon on the Common. 357 

Laying out streets on new lands, 376 

A Police Commission, 417 

Annexation of portion of Brookline, 435, 496, 543, 559 

Management of fires, 450 

Salaries of Fire Commissior ers, 461 

A Public Park, 462 

Confirmation of Fire Commissioners, 477 

Soup for the Poor, 486, 524 

Washington Park improvements, 497, 498 

Repairs of Minot School-house, 498 

Report of Committee on Legislative Matters, 510 

Annexation of Winthrop. 569 

Vote of Thanks to President, 572 



Petroleum — 

Committee requested to report changes necessary, 521 
Pickering, Mr., Ward 6 — remarks on 

Order relating to small-pox hospital, 6 
The Badge question, 31 
Opening Public Library on Sunday, 37 
Refreshments, etc., 48 

Site of Primary School-house, Marlborough St., 135 
The Burrill Claim. 137, 265, 274 
Widening of Water St., 155, 166 
Widening of streets around new P. O., 164 
Fourth of July, 167. 193 
Salaries of officers in Lavi' Dept., 177, 185 
Columbus Ave. extension, 204 
Infringement of dignity of Council, 256 
Salaries in Law Department, 257 
Enlargement of City Hall, 286 
Enlargement of Quincy Market, 230 
Firing cannon on Common, 357 
Laying out streets on new lands, 376 
Reorganization of Fire Dept., 376 
Annexation of portion of Brookline, 435, 560 
Water of Farm Pond, 450 
Revision of City Charter, 452 . 
Salaries of Fire Commissioners. 460 
A Public Park. 464 

Confirmation of Fire Commissioners, 478 
Soup for the Poor, 487, 542 
Washington Park improvements, 500 
Police — 

Discussion on Police Commission, and order indefinitely 

postponed, 417 
Port Physician — 

Order passed for report of ordinances, 69 
Powers, Mr., Ward 4 — remarks on 
Election of George A. Shaw, 71 
Widening of Water Street, 144 

Expenditures for Common and Public Grounds, 183, 194 
Probate — see County of Buftblk. 
Public Baths — 

Discussion on Bath-house at Mt. Washington Ave. bridge, 

182; order passed authorizing, 195 
Order passed authorizing Public Bathing Houses in different 

sections of city, 192 
Order for placing bathing-houses in charge of Bd. of Health 

indefinitely postponed, 57 
Public Buildings — see also Schools — 

City Hall, order passed for ventilation by skylights, 18 

p.artition in committee-room discussed. 20 

partition in committee-room indefinitely postponed, 29 

discussion on division of committee-room by folding 

doors. 39 
report and order for hiring building in Pemberton Sq., 

286 
discussion on, and order passed authorizing stand- 
pipes, 346 

order passed for applying Tobey's invention, 362 

Repairs authorized for City Hall, for police stations, engine 

houses, etc., 37 
Report on engine liouse. Ward 14, 61 
Report inexpedient to accept rooms of First Bap. Church, 

96 
Petitions of Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insur- 
ance Company for leave to inspect boilers in Public 

Buildings, report inexpedient, accepted, 148 
Report on City Stable on Highland Street, 184 
Order passed to procure plans and estimates for new police 

station. Fourth Street, 185 
Order passed for plans and estimates of stable in Highland 

Street. 192 
Communication from Superintendent relating to music 

stands, 193 
Report on new station house, South Boston. 204 
Engine No. 18, order passed to place Horse Hose carriage in. 

214 
Engine No. 7, order passed to place Horse Hose carriage in, 

214 
Engine No. 23, order passed to place Horse Hose carriage 

in, 214 
For Steam fire engine on Parker Street, 234 
For Steam fire engine on Burnt District, 234 
Roxbury City Hall, sale authorized, 234 
Order passed rescinding order authorizing purchase of land 

on Adams Street, for Police Station 11, 235 
Order passed for purchase of land of J. H. Robinson for 

Police Station 11, 2.35 
Order passed for site for Hook and Ladder house No. 4, 237 
Order passed for erection of police station house on Fourth 

Street, 237 
Order passed for erection of engine house corner Longwood 

and Brookline Avenues. 243 
Report on Engine house No. 16, 245 
Report on stable on Highland Street, 245 
Order passed for building Hook and Ladder house for Co. 6, 

255 
Discussion on purchasing estate of Nath. Whiting for en- 
gine house, 255 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



21 



Orders passed for purchasing est.ito of Nath. Whiting, and 
erecting engine house, 265 

Order passed for erection of stable on Highland Street, 274 

Orders passed for ei-timates for engine on Masou Street, 274 

Report for purchase of additional land for station house, 
South Boston, 274 

Order passed for purchasing additional land for station 
house, South Boston, 285 

Order rescinded, and new order passed for Hose house, 
Longwood, 287 

Order passed for hiring part of Niles' Block, 297 

Dorchester Police Station, order passed for erection of, 331 

Discussion, and order passed for Mason Street Engine house, 
etc., 331 

Order passed to erect bell-tower on Hose house No. 12, 346 

Discussion, and order passed providing office accommoda- 
tions for Directors Public Inst., 356 

Discussion and order passed for erection of Hook and Lad- 
der house on Dudley and Forest Streets, 390 

Order passed for sale of portion of Engine house No. 12, 
416 

Discussion on steam-heating apparatus and fence for engine 
house, "Ward 14. 416 

Order for erection of Hose house, cor. Upton St. and Shaw- 
mut Ave., indefinitely postponed, 417 

Order passed to report expediency of repealing order for 
engine house. Mason Street, 426 
Public Grounds — see Common, etc. 
Public Institutions — 

Committee requested to report on expediency of amending 
ordinance relating to Port Physician, 38 

Directors requested to delay election of phj'sician, 38 

Lunatic Hospital at South Boston, order passed rescinding 
order relative to refusal of permits for admission, 59 

Removal of building at Winthrop authorized, 182 

Ordinance passed providing for care of neglected children, 
214 

Order passed for telegraph lines to South Boston, 235 

Annual report of Directors, 253 

Charity Bureau and Temporary Home, orders passed for 
repairs, 285 

Order passed requesting committee to report an order to pro- 
vide suitable site for Home for the Poor, and on recom- 
mendations from Grand Jury, 497 

Discussion on religious instruction and report recommitted, 
556 

Report on removal of Houses of Correction and Reforma- 
tion, and reference to next City (Council, 557 

Resignation of Samuel C. Cobb as Director referred to next 
City Council, 557 

Communication from Directors in regard to religious in- 
struction, 570 

Home for the Poor, committee requested to report in one 
month, 124 

order passed authorizing purchase of Austin Farm, 

254 

order passed to provide for plans and estimates, 571 

Public Lands — 

Boston Co-operative Association, new bond for land sold on 
B. Canton St., 36 

Order for disposing of Swett St. Hospital property indefi- 
nitely postponed, 297 

$375,000 for purchase of land from New England Mutual 
Life Insurance Co., 297 

Swett St. Hospital territory, order passed for grading, 390 

Swett St. Hospital transferred to, 539 

Order passed to sell to Mass. Horn. Hospital Corporation, 
lot of land on Concord St., 557 
Public Library — Remonstrance against opening Sunday, .36 

Discussion on opening Sundays. 36, S7 

Order passed to open Sundays, 47 

Report and order passed to place Hyatt lights, iron shutters, 
etc., 381 

Donation from Hon. Henry L. Pierce, 542 

Refreshments— Substitute order by Mr. Flynn, Ward 7, 47 
Debate in relation to, 47 

Amendment striking out " carriage hire " considered, 59 
Amendment of carriage hire laid on table, 69 

Rewards — 

$500 offered for detection of incendiaries of Swett Street 

Hospital, 329 
$1,000 offered for detection of assassin of Bridget Landergin, 
521 

Rules and orders — of 1872 temporarily adopted, 2 

Joint Com. .appointed to prepare joint rules and orders, 2 
Com. to prepare rules and orders for Council, 2 
Of last Common Council adopted, with amendments, 4 
Joint rules of last year, as amended, adopted, 5 
Concurrence in .amendment to print pocket edition, 17 

Salaries — For officers and crew of fire-boat, 38 

Discussion on amendments and points of order, 86 

Of city officers, report recommitted, 110 

Of city officers, considered. 147 

Of Supt. of Printing, reduced from $2,800 to $2,500, 147; on 

non-concurrence of Aldermen, adherence in amendment 

reducing, 155 



Of Law Dep't., discussion and recommitment, 185 

Orders passed fixing salaries of City Solicitor, Assistants, 

and Clerk, 227, 257 
Discussion on paying salaries of teachers in Normal School, 

298 
Of Port Physician, communication from Board of Health, 

and from Port Physician. 358 
Order passed fixing salary of Assist.ant Resident Physician 

at Deer Island, 390 
Discussion on salaries of Fire Commissioners, and order 

passed, 460 
Discussion on, and order passed, establishing salaries of per- 
manent Firemen. 476 
Schools — Order passed for repairs and furniture, m 

Order passed to pay $3,320 for rooms of Inst, of Technology 

for drawing school, 69 
Prescott and Chapman Dist's, report and order to authorize 

plans for primary house. 106 
Communication from School Com. requesting additional 

appi'opriation. 106 
Marlborough St. Primary school, discussion on site, 135; 

Remonstrance on same, 135 
Tablets on Starr King Snhool-house authorized, 147 
Clock in tower of school-house, City Point, authorized, 147 
Harris School-house, furnishing master's room authorized, 

147 
.\ppleton Primary School-house, use for Normal School 

authorized, 147 
Order passed authorizing purchase of land in rear of Minot 

School-house, 164 
Purchase of lot on Newbury .and Exeter Sts. authorized, 182 
Report on erecting school-house on City Hall estate, Boston 

Highlands, 184 
Dudley District, $20,000 for school-house, 192 
Vote on veto of Normal School order, 195 
Order passed authorizing plans .and estimates to be procured 

for English High and L.atin School-houses, 203 
Order passed authorizing plans and estimates to be procured 

for Primary School-house on Newbury and Exeter Sts., 

203 
Order amending order relating to Primary School-house, 

Ward 6, so as to read Ward 9, 212 
Request for copies of report on rearranging school districts, 

224 
Order passed to p.ay Normal School .s.alaries to June 1, 226 
School-houses for Prescott and Chapman Districts. 234 
Report on erecting Primary School-house, Blue Hill Avenue. 

255 
Ticknor School-house, order passed for r.aising tower, 266 
Report on school-house on Houghton place, 266 
Orders passed for Grammar School-house, Houghton Place, 

274 
Orders passed for purchase of l.ind on Quincy St., 274 
Comins' District, order passed providing temporary accom- 

mod.itions, 296 
Order passed for school-house corner Newbury and Exeter 

Sts., 297 
Dorchester-Everett Dist.. order passed to furnLsli additional 

Primary School accommodations, 328 
Minot Dist., order passed to furnish additional accommoda- 
tions, 329 
Ticknor School-house, order passed authorizing alteration 

to accommodate Gr.ammar School, 329 
Order passed for Back Bay School-house, reconsidered, 331 
Discussion on erecting school-house corner of Newbury and 

PJxeterSts., 347 
Order passed to complete furnishing school house, L Street, 

346, 390 
Oliver Primary School-house, order passed authorizing sale, 

362 
Order passed for accommodations in Washington Village, 416 
Order passed for tablet in new school-house on site of old 

Roxbury City Hall, 425 
Bigelow School Dist., order passed for temporary accom- 
modations for primary pupils, 425 
Order passed relative to State Normal School in Boston, 438 
Old Mather School-house, — 

Order passed for sale of. 276 

Order passed for ascertaining cost of cancelling sale, 358 

Report of cost of cancelling sale, 417 

Order passed to cancel sale, 425, 449 

Order passed for removal, 521 
New Mather School-house, order passed to furnish, and 

complete filling and grading. 450 
Order passed authorizing fitting up of Bowditch School- 
house for accommod.ation of English High and Evening 

Schools, 479 
Lincoln School, order passed to provide private office for 

master, 485 
Minot School-house, order passed to grade land, and x^rovide 

fence, 450 

Discussion on, and order passed for repairs, 497 

Report of legality of Girls' High School, 496 

Order passed for accommodations for primary pupils 

between Arlington and Parker Sts., 509 
Lewis Dist.. order passed for accommodations, .509 
Order passed for accommod.ations for schools in vicinity of 

Norfolk St., 509 



22 



IXDKX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



In now District, Washington Village, referred to next City- 
Council, 521 

Requests of School Com. referred to next City Council. 544 

Heath Street Primary School, order passed for additional 
accommodations, 556 

Vernon St. Primary School-house, order passed to pave 
yard, 557 

Gibson School Dist., order passed for temporary accommo- 
dations for primary scholars, 570 

Girls' High School, order passed providing changes to study 
Photography, 670 
Sewers — Annual report of Supt., 30 
Shaw, Mr., Ward 5 — 

Address on calling Council to order for organization, 1 

Remarks on — 

Taking old almshouse, Roxbury, for hospital, 14 

Resolve requesting Board of Health to apply for needed 
powers, 15 

Opening Public Library on Sunda3-, 36 

Salaries of city olliccrs, 86 

AVidcning of Federal Street, 97 

Sale of estate taken from C. M. Wheelwright, 99 

Annexation of Brookline, 104 

Widening of W.nter Street, 123, loS, 166 

I'rimary School-house. Marlborough St., 136 

Burnt Dii'trict Loan, 137 

Jvlorthampton St. District. 148 

I'erraite to build on Kingston Street, 154 

Widening of streets .'iround new P.O., 16.') 

Third assistant in I^aw Dept., 176 

Salaries of Officers in Law Dept.. 177, 185 

Construction of bath-house at Mt. Wash. Ave. Bridge, 182 

Watering streets in Burnt District, 185 

Columbus Ave. extension, 192. 204 

Kourth of July expenditures, 167, 193, 225 

Improvements on Common and Public Grounds, 194,203 

Petition of Boston and Providence Railroad Company, 212 

Payment of Claims on Swett Street Hospital, 213, 237, 253 

Yeas and nays in vei'ifying vote, 224 

Infringement of dignity of Council, 250 

}<eservoir on Parker's Hill, 235 

Orders relating to Fire Dept.. 244 

Purchasing estate of Nath. Whiting for engine house, 255 

Reorganization of Fire Dept.. 257, 365, 376, 395 

Purchase of Steam fire engines, 205 

South Boston Flats, 276 

Accommodations tor Insurance Brigade, 285 

Enlargement of City Hall, 286 

Extending Fayette Court and Hay ward Place. 296 

Salaries of teachers in Normal School, 298 

Enlargement of Q.uincy Market, 299 

Repairs on Court House, 329 

Death of Thomas H. Doherty, 324 

Purchase of Fort Hill Wharf. 329, 348 

Stand-pipes in City Hall. 346 

Office accommodations for Directors of Public Institutions, 
356 

Repairs of Steam Engine No. 8, 375 

Repairs of Steam Engine No. 15, 376 

Sale of portion of Engine house No. 12. 416 

Steam-heating apparatus for engine house. Ward 14, 416, 
426 

Market leases, 417 

A Police Commission, 417 

Taking gravel from Long Island, 426 

Annexation of portion of Brookline, 435,543, 559 

Supply of water from Sudbury River, 435 

Revision of City Charter. 437, 451 

Organizing company for Engine No. 24, 449 

Requiring laying gas pipes, 449 

Management of fires, 450 

Salaries of Fire Commissioners, 460 

A Public Park. 462 

Salaries of permanent firemen, 476 

Confirmation of Fire Commissioners. 477 

Washington Park improvements, 497, 498 

Repairs of Minot School-house, 498 

Personal explanation in regard to Washington Park, 509 

Report of Committee on Legislative M.atters, 510 

Soup for the Poor, 486, 522, 541, 557 

Duties of Fire Commis.sionerp, 540 

Religious instruction in Public Institutions, 556 

Annexation of Winthrop, 569 

Vote of Thanks to the President, 572 
Shepard Edward O., (President of Council.) — 

Elected President, 1 

Address on accepting ofDce of President, 1 

Remarks on — 

Opening Public Libnary on Sunday, 37 

Death oY Thomas H. Doherty, 324 

Management of Fires. 451 

Response to Vote of Thanks, 572 
Small-pox — 

Special Committee .appointed to take charge of Swett Street 

Hospital, 2 
Com. from Mayor in regard to hospital accommodations, 4 
Order for taking old almshouse, Roxbury, discussed and 
passed, 6 



Order for hospital on Swett Street, discussed. 14 

Order for taking old almshouse, Roxbury. discussed, 14 

Order passed to provide reception room tor patients. 15 

Order for fumigating public buildings, rejected, 16 

Order passed to provide for disinfecting air escaping from 

hospit.ils, 31 
Pet'n Mass. Horn. Med. Soc. for hospitals granted, 69 
Order passed rel.itive to early closing of hospital on Mar- 

cella Street. 175 
Com. from Board of Health, requesting disposition of 
Swett Street Hospit-il, 358 
South Boston Flats — 

Order passed authorizing the Mayor to execute indenture, 

249 
Discussion on, and amended order passed, 275 
Soup for the Poor — 

Discussion on, and order passed, 486, 540 
Discussion on, 521, 557 
Stables — 

Order for transferring control to City Council, 50 
Order passed rel.ative to giving control to City Council, 61 
Report relating to transfer of power to City Council, and 
recommittal, 70 
Street Commissioners — 

Ruling of President, and opinion of City Solicitor, on con- 
current votes of City Council, 166 
Streets — 

Annual report of Superintendent. 60 

Discussion on widening Federal Street, 85 

Discussion on widening of Federal, and other streets, 97 

Order passed to take estate of M. H. G-leeson on Summer 

and High Streets, 99 
Order passed for exchange of land on Forest Hills Avenue 

with Sam. B. Pierce, 99 
Debate on order for sale of estate taken from C. M. Wheel- 
wright on Water and Broad Streets, 99 
Burnt iSistrict, order passed to keep free from obstruction, 

106 
Discussion on widening W.ater Street, 110 
Remonstrance against widening in vicinity of P. O., 121 
AVidening Water Street, reports .and discussion, 123 
Order passed for public sale of estate taken from C. M. 

Wheelwright, 124; amendment concurred in, 135 
Communication from Postmaster relative to widening in vi- 
cinity of P. O., 1-38 
Further widening of W.ater Street, discussed, 144 
Release to Samuel Weld and others for right of drainage be- 
tween Moreland and Winthrop Street, 154 
Discussion on widening W.ater Street. 155 
Discussion and order passed for widening of streets around 

new P. O., 164 
Order passed to purchase land at the .iunctiou of Emerson 

and Third Streets. South Boston. 175 
Order passed for watering streets in Burnt District, 185 
Columbus Avenue extension, discussion on pajing Provi- 
dence R. R. Cor., 192 
Discussion on Columbus Avenue extension, and rejection of 

order to pay Prov. R. R. Cor., 204 
Report on widening and extending Water Street, 243 
Order passed for releasing to B. and Prov. R. Co., portion of 

Church Street. 274 
Right of way given to estates of Nath. Whiting, and A. A. 

Burrage on Washington Square. 296 
Discussion on extending Fayette Court and Hay ward Place, 

296 
Report on widening and extending Fayette Court and Hay- 
ward Place, 346 
Discussion on rebuilding on Washington Street, 331 ; order 

passed for permits to rebuild, 362 
Order passed for Street Commissioners, and Committee to 
confer with certain land owners, for laying out streets, 
376 
Order passed authorizing conveyance of portion of Sturgis 

Street to heirs of W. H. Boardraan. 521 
Order passed to pay J. H. Jenkins $300 for clerical services 
to Committee, 569 

— Arch St. — order passed to widen and extend, 16S 

— Bedford St. — order passed to widen from Washington to 

Chauncy Sts., 29 ; order passed to widen, 175 

— Berkeley St. — notice to State Commissioners, 243 

— Broad St. — order passed for widening, from Atlantic Avenue 

to Summer Street, 253 

— Chauncy St. — order passed to widen, 85 

— Congress St. — order passed to widen, 168 ; order passed to 

widen between Water and St.ate Sts.. 203 

— Devonshire St. — order passed to widen from Summer to 

Franklin, 29; between Franklin and Milk, 155 

— Eastern Ave. — report and order passed for laying out, and 

beginning construction of bridge, 570 

— Eliot St. — order passed for extension to Columbus Avenue, 

298 

— Essex St. — order passed to widen, 274, 390 

— Eustis St. — report on extension, 346; order passed to ex- 

tend, 521 

— Federal St. — order passed to widen, 168 

— Franklin St. — order passed to widen and extend, 168 

— Hawley St. — order passed to widen, 168 

— Lincoln St. — order passed to widen, 59, 175 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



23 



— Magazine St. — order passed to widen, 521 

— Milk St. — order passed to widen, 168 

— Oliver St. — order passed to extend, 168 

— Otis St. — order passed to widen, 29 

— Pearl St. — order passed to extend, 168 ; to widen, 255, 557 

— Pleasant St. — order passed to widen, 298 

— Quincy Place — oi'der passed to extend, 621 

— Washington St. — order passed to widen, between Boylston 

and Avery, 274 

— Water St. — discussion on, and order passed to widen, 165; 

order passed to take estate surrendered by Chas. Gr. Greene 
and others, 476 

— West Chester Park — order passed to extend to Beacon St., 

274 
Suffolk St. District — 

Order to pay John L. Brigbam $750 for services as book- 
keeper, 18 
Committee on to exercise certain powers, 121 
Committee authorized to exercise powers, 135 
Order passed to pay commissioners $4,000 for adjudicating 
damages of Model Lodging House Assoc, 192 
Summer Vacation, 299 

Taxes — 

Order passed laying specific tax for 1873-74, 138 

Order passed for facilitating early collection, 274 
Theatres — 

Order passed for report of precautions against fire, 17 
Thacher, Mr., Ward 15 — remarks on 

Taking old almshouse, Roxburj', for hospital, 15 

Sujjply of water from Sudbury River, 436 
Train, Air., Ward 13 — remarks on 

Election of George A. Shaw, 70 

Nomination of Engineers of Fire Dept., 87 

The Burrili Claim, 137, 265 

AA'idening of Water St., 157 

Expenditures for Common and Public Grounds, 182 

Payment of claims on Swett St. Hospital, 253 

School-house on Quincy St., 266 

Disposal of Swett St. Hospital, 297 

Repairs of Engine No. 8, 375 

Hook and Ladder house on Dudley and Forest Sts., 390 

Steam-heating apparatus in Engine house. Ward 14, 416 

Laying out Magazine St. territory, 464 

Washington Park improvements, 499 

Annexation of Brookline, 560 
Treasury Department — Report for financial year, 203 

Report on examination of accounts accepted, 216 

Examination of Stoughton School and Poor Funds and Gib- 
son School Fund. 243 

$G,000 for extra clerk hire allowed, 438 

Unfinished business — 

Of last year, referred to Joint Standing Committees, 2 

In hands of Committees, referred to next City Council, 471 
Upham, Mr., Ward 16 — remarks on 

Clock on Ticknor School-house, 246 

New Fire-alarm repeater, 357 

Reorganization of Fire Dept., 439 

Removal of old Mather School-house. 521 

Votes of Thanks — 

To Co. G, Third Reg. Inf., for aid in fire in Hanover St., 87 
Order passed requesting Mayor to communicate thanks to 
Commandant of U. S. Navy Yard and Commandant at 
Fort Warren, for assistance at fire, 237 
To John F. W. Ware for oration on July 4, 285 
To Hon. Henry L. Pierce for donation to Public Library, 556 
Voting Lists — see Elections. 

Warren, Mr., Ward 12 — remarks on 

Clock on Ticknor School-house, 296 
Washington's Birthday — Order passed for obser%'ing, 69 
Water Works — 

Drinking-trough cor. Tremont and Cabot Sts. referred to 

Water Board, 85 
Communication from Water Board, requesting additional 

appropriation, 106 
Order passed authorizing Mayor to pet'n for power to take 

lands on Parker Hill, 144 
Communication from Water Board in relation to supplying 

E. B. from Flax Pond, 148 
Reservoir on Parker's Hill, discussed and order passed, 235 
Discussion on supply of water from Sudbury River, 435 
Order for placing Lowry Hydrants indefinitely postponed, 

450 
Order passed requesting Board to report on condition of 

water of Farm Pond, 462 
Order passed authorizing contract for water pipes, 485 
Discussion on furnishing water to Brookline, 487 
Order for taking water from Sudbury River, referred to next 

City Council, 570 
Orders to supply Brookline finally disposed of, 571 
Wells, Mr., Ward 3 — remarks on 

Taking old almshouse, Roxbury, for hospital, 14 
Refreshments, etc., 47 



Widening of Federal St., 86, 98 

Nomination of engineers of Fire Department, 87 

Primary scbool-bouse, Marlborough St., 136 

Time for annual report Fire Dept., 154 

Widening of Water St., 158, 165 

Construction of bath-house at Mt. Wash. Ave. Bridge, 182 

Fourth of July expenditures, 167. 193, 225 

Improvements of Common and Public Grounds, 194, 203 

Payment of Claims on Swett St. Hospital, 213 

Com. of Fire Dept. visiting Steam fire engine establishments, 
2-36 

Orders relating to Fire Dept., 244 

Purchase of Steam fire engines, 264 

Accommodations for Insurance Brigade, 285 

Enlargement of City Hall, 286 

Disposal of Swett St. Hospital, 297 

Cora, on reorganization of Fire Dept. visiting other cities, 
297 

Enlargement of Quincy Market, 299 

Music on Common, 299 

Mason St. Engine house, 331 

Sale of old Mather School-house, 348 

Reorganization of Fire Dept., 378 

Supply of water from Sudbury River, 436 

Revision of City Charter, 437 

Salaries of Fire Commissioners, 461 

A Public Park, 463 

Salaries of permanent firemen, 476 

Confirmation of Fire Commissioners, 477 

Soup for the Poor, 486, 524 

Repairs of Minot School-house, 498 

Washington Park improvements, 498 

Change of boundary between Boston and Brookline, 543 
West, Mr., Ward 16 —remarks on 

The badge question, 31 

Opening Public Library on Sunday, 37 

Division of committee room, City Hall, 39 

Refreshments, etc., 47 

Widening of Federal Street, 86, 98 

Salaries of city oflicers, 86 

Nomination of engineers of Fire Department, 87 

Widening of Water Street, 124 

Site of Primary School-house, Marlborough Street, 135 

The Burrili Claim, 137, 263 

Burnt District Loan, 137 

Fourth of July appropriation, 167, 225, 235 

Construction of bath-bouse at Mt. Washington Ave. bridge, 
182 

Salaries in Law Department, 185 

Columbus Avenue extension, 205 

Payment of claims on Swett-street Hospital, 213 

Revision of City Charter, 234, 436, 451 

Committee on Fire Department visiting Steam fire-engine es- 
tablishments, 236 

Orders relating to Fire Department, 245 

Reorganization of Fire Department, 256, 362, 379, 392 

School-house on Quincy Street, 266 

South Boston Flats, 276 

Committee on Reorganization of Fire Department visiting 
other cities, 297 

Cannon firing on Common, 347, 357 

Sale of old Mather School-house, 348 

Fort Hill Wharf property, 348 

H. and L. house on Dudley and Forest Streets, 390 

A Police Commission. 417 

Grading and fencing Minot School-house, 450 

Salaries of Fire Commissioners, 461 

Confirmation of Fire Commissioners, 478 

Washington Park improvements, 497, 498 

Repairs of Minot School-house, 498 

Soup for the Poor, 524 

Additional appropriation for Public Library, 570 
Whiston, Mr.. Ward 8 — remarks on 

Construction of batli-house at Mt. Washington Ave. Bridge, 
182 
Wilbur, Mr., Ward 9, — remarks on 

Carriage hire, 69 

Expenditures for Common and Public Grounds, 182, 194 

Columbus Avenue extension, 205 

Additional appropriation for Fourth of July, 225 

The Burrili Claim, 265 

Salaries of Fire Commissioners, 461 

Winlock, Prof. Joseph, order passed to pay $500 for furnish- 
ing true time, 357 

Yeas and Nays — 

Decision on right to call for in solving doubt, 224, 226 ; re- 
consideration, 236, 237 
Ordered, in solving doubt, 236 

FINAL PROCEEDINGS. 

Resolution of Thanks to President, 571 
Response of President, 572 
Order passed to print final proceedings, 574 
Adjournment, sine die, 574 



CITY G-OVERNMEISTT 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Organization of the City Government, 
JAN. 6, 1873. 



The Mayor and members elect of tbe two branches 
of the City Council met in the City Hall at ten o'clock 
this morning, for the organiz;)tion of the City Gov- 
ernment for the iiresent muinoiDal year. 

Board of AltleriBen. 

The Board of Aldermen was called to order bv the 
City Clerk. 

A message was received from the Common Council 
informing the Boanl that a quorum of members was 
present, ready to be qnalitied. 

The Board went into convention with the Common 
Council, for the qualification of the members of 
the City Governmenl. 

CoinmoTi Council. 

The Common Council was called to order by Georire 
A. Shaw, senior member, in service in 1857." who on 
taking the chair, addressed the Council as follows: 

Gentlemen of the Council— i had the honor to bo a 
member of the Council for the year 1857, and that 
term of service being anterior to that of any other 
member elect, it becomes my duty to call the Council 
to order. In doing this I maybe iiermitted to say. 
tliat the constant grovvtli of the population of our 
city, the steady and permanent increase of our mer- 
cantile, commercial, and mechanical interests, the 
improvements constantly required in the development 
of our more newly acquired territory, as well as for 
changes and iini)rovements upon the old, add year by 
year to the labors of the City Council, but at no tioie 
since the organization of the City Government under 
its charter, have its duties and responsibilities been 
as important as at this nresent time. 

The terrible calamity which has recently fallen 
upon us, and by which so many of our most enter- 
prising citizens have seen the accumulations of years 
of industry crumble away, and which for the' time 
being almost paralyzed their energies, has yet de- 
veloped the recuperative powers of our people; and 
the liberality bestowed upon the unfortunate, and 
the encouragement they have received both at home 
and from abroad, have enabled them to renew their 
labors full of hope and courage. But very much yet 
remains for the ;-upervision and co-operation of the 
City (Tovernment in restoring ro its wonted uses tlie 
devastated territory. 

I think we may congratulate our.^elves that the 
General Court of our State has met, with a liberal 
hand, the desires of the city .in granting such legis- 
lation as will enable the carrying out of the require- 
ments necessary to relntild the now desolate ruins, 
and it will be our duty as it will be ovir pleasure as a 
co-ordinate branch of' the City Council to aid in every 
proper and legitimate manner in such measures as 
will best promote the public good, in improving and 
rebuilding the burnt disirict, that it may be even 
more than ever the pride of our business marts. 

There may be and no doubt are required many re- 
forms in the management of the municipal affairs of 
our city, but Tiothing calls for more innnediate and de- 
cided action than the thorough revision of the Depart- 
ment of Healtli.especially when we consider the fearful 
ravages of the disease now so prevalent among us, 
and 1 can have no doubt that every member of the 
Council will use his personal influence to the end 
that it may no longer be said that because of differ- 
ences of oninion among the members of the present 
Board of Health upon the matter of locating a recep- 
tacle for tlie diseased, and no suificient provisions 
been heretofore ma^le available for their care, or 
for the protection of the community, the disease 
itself has thereby been allowed to spread and con- 
tinue. 

Although this Board has but a concurrent voice in 
such matters, yet the community has a right to ex- 
pect of us the exercise of our best energies and posi- 
tive action, in pushing forward all wise measures of 
relief, and that with all possible lespatch. 

Let us sec to it that, so far at least as this branch 
of the Government is concerned, they shall not be 
disappointed. 

CEEDEXTIALS OF MEMBERS. 

On motion of Mr. Thacber of Ward 15, Messrs. 
Tljacher of Ward 15, Burflitt of Ward l(j, and Wells 
of Ward 3 were appointed a committee to receive the 
certificates of members. 

The committee reported that they had received the 
credentials of fifty-eight members^ by wliich it ap- 



peared that there was a quorum of members present, 
an J on motion of Mr. Page of Ward !J, iherepoit 
was accepted. 

Mr. BlacUmar of Ward 11 was appointed a 
committee to inlorm the Mayor and Aldermen that a 
quoium of members was present. 

Mr. Blackmar soon reported that the Mayor and 
Aldermen would immediately meet the Ccmnion 
Council in convention for the qualification of mcm- 
berf. 

In Convention. 

The Mayor and Aldermen camein for aconvention, 
as agreed upon, accompanied by ex-Mayors Qnincy, 
Rice, Wightman, Norcrcss and Gastcn, and several 
oiner gentlemen. 

Prayer was offered by Kev. James H. Means. 

The oaths of office were administered to Hon. 
Henry Ij. Pierce, Mayor elect, by Hon. Horace Gray 
Jr.. Associate Ju; tice of the Supreme Judicial Court. 

The oaths of office were then administered by the 
Mayor to the members elect of each branch of the 
City Council. 

The Mayor then delivered his Inaugural Address. 

The Mayor cor.cluded the reading of his address at 
half-past eleven o'clock, having occupied forty-five 
minutes in its delivery. 

Two additional members of the Council were qual- 
ified, when, the business of the convention being 
concluded, the Mayor and Aldermen withdrew. 

ELECTION OF PRESIDENT. 

Oi motion of Mr. Page of Ward fl. the Council 
proceeded to the ele^tifin of President. Me-sis. Page 
of AVard 9, Powers of Ward 4 and Hall of Ward 10 
were appointed a committee to receive and count the 
votes, and reported the result as follows: 

Whole nmnber of votes 62, all of which were for 
Edward O. Shepard. 

The President was conducted to the chair by 
Messrs. Pickering of Ward 6 and Dean of Ward 12, 
when he addressed the Council as follows: 

ADDHES.S OF THE PRESIDENT. 

Gentlemen of the Common Council — The only re- 
turn I can now make you for this honor, and this 
generous expression of your favor and confidence is 
to say with all heartiness I thank you, and to assure 
you that I undertake this oflice deeply sensible of its 
responsibilities and difficulties, and conscious of an 
earnest purjjose to (hscharge all of i!s duties with 
fairness to you and with faithfulness to the public 
interests. 

At the oulsct I invoke your charitable judgment 
upon the mistakes I may unwittingly commit, and 
yoiir constant assistance and cootieration, without 
wliich all my endeavors will prove unsuccessful. 

I take pleasure in testifying openly that in tVie pri- 
vate assurance of support which most of you have so 
kindly volunteered to me during the past few weeks, 
there has been no word of selfish request for prefer- 
ment of place, which it is in the power of the Presi- 
dent to bestow, but all having at heart the public 
trust committed to your charge, more than any pri- 
vate aims, have purposely left me to enter upon th; 
duties of this office without a trammel. 

If the same subservience of private to public inter- 
ests shall characterize the conduct of each member 
throughout the year, as I confidently trust it will, 
there will follow such harmonious action, such far- 
sighted economy, and such wise legislation, as will 
more than fulfil the high expectations which ihe peo- 
ple have placed upon the City Council of 1873. And 
if those of you to whom the division of this body into 
working parties, which its committees are. shall seem 
in any respects erroneous, will .iudge of it by the 
same unselfish standard, I will cheerfully abide the 
result. 

While committees muft be the "eyes and ears." and, 
to some extent, the "head and hands" of an assem- 
bly like this, it has often seemed to me that after 
thay have digested the details of the various matters 
committed to them, they should always place before 
this body such explanations and such reasons for the 
conclusions they report, that every member may be 
able to vote nnderstandingly upon the merits of the 
question. 

The circumstances of the destruelion of a large 
part of the business portion of our city by fire will 
render the year upon which we are entering one of 
the most important in the whole history of Boston, 
f n 1 as momentous as any that is likely ever to occur. 
The loss of this immense amount of taxable property 
and the crippled condition of many branches of trade 
v/ill make imperative unusual prudence in thoexpend- 
iture of the public money. 

On the other hand, the opportunity for long-needed 
improvements to the streets and grade of the district 
now lying In waste is so favorable, and the courage 



JANUARY 



6 



1873. 



o 



nnd fuitli of cur cilizcna rcniahi so unsliaken 
by untold losses and widespread disiisler, that 
you will doubtless be called upon to exer- 
cise, in K'grard to all subjects I bat concern 
tlie solid growth and prosjienty of our c'ty, 
that wisest economy which rcgaids not only tlio ini- 
niediate municipal necessities, but has an eye also to 
the greater Boston which every succeeding yeir will 
ccrtiiinly behold. 

The i)eople have manifested their view of the im- 
portance of a wise Administration of the mnnicipnl 
affairs of the current year by electing and i)liicinj; in 
these seats the men whose high character and large 
experience distinguish this Common Council above 
most of its predecessors. 

I enter with yon into this llc-M of arduous labois 
that stretches over the next tv\elve mcmlbs with tin; 
expectation that wisdom and honesty of purpose will 
prevail in all our acts and deliberations; that the 
liigh trusts C()i:tided to our care will be faithfully dis- 
charged ; that devotion to the public interests will 
brighten all onr otiicial duties; and that harmony 
and good will will have unbroken sway in all our In- 
tel course and proceedings. 

ELICCTION OF CI.ERK. 

On motion of Mr. Pickering of Ward 6, it was voted 
to proceed to the election of Clerk, 

Alessrs. Pickering of Ward G, Risleen of Ward 1(1, 
and Davis of Ward 14 were appoinied a committee to 
receive and count the votes for Clerk, and reported 
the result, to be as follows: 

Whole number of votes 63, all of which were for 
Washington P. Gregjr. 

The oaths of office were adniini.-tered to the Clerk 
by Hon. John P. Healy, City Solicitor. 

On motion of Mr. Perkins cf Vv'ard G, a connnittec 
was appoinied to inform the Board of Aldermen of 
the organization of the Common Council, bv the 
choice of Edward O. Shepar.'l as President and Wash- 
ington P. Gregg as Clerk. 

Mr. Perkins was cliarged with the message. 

A message was received from the Board of Alder- 
men infortuing the Council of the organization of 
the Board by the choice of Leonard R. Cutter as 
Chairman. 

A jiroposition from the Board of Aldcnncn for a 
convention forthwith for the election of City Clerk, 
■was concurred in. 

ELECTION OF CITY CLERK. 

The Mayor and Aldermen came in for a convention 
for the election of a City (;lerk. 

Alderman Gatfield and Messrs. Prescott of Ward !), 
and Dacey of Ward 2, of the C(.uncil, were appointed 
a cimmittee to receive and count the votes. 

The committee reported the whole number of votes 
to be 74. of whicb 67 were for Samuel F. McCleary, 
5 for F. H. Underwood, and 1 each for J. M. Bugbec 
and E. W. James. 

The oaths of office were administered to the <)ity 
Clerk by the Mayor. 

The business of the convention being ccncluded, 
the Mayor and Aldermen withdrew. 

RULES AND ORDERS. 

On motion of Mr. Caton of Ward 11— 

Ordered, That the rules and orders of the Common 
Council of 1872 be adopted as the rules and orders of 
the Common (.Jouncii. until otheiwise ordered. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Mr. Page of Ward 9— 

Ordered, That Thursday evening next, at eight 
o'clock, be assigned for choice of Commltte'e on 
Accounts. 

Messrs. Page of Ward 9, Weston of Ward 1. and 
Jones of Ward 14 were appointed a committee to 
nominate candidates for Committee on Accounts. 

On motion of Mr. Pickering of Ward G— 

Ordered, That Thursday evening next , at SVj o'clock, 
be assigned for choice of Committee on Finance on 
the part of the Council. 

Messrs. Pickering of Ward 6, Thacher of Ward 15 
and Bur litt of Ward 16 were appointed a committee 
to nominate candidates for Committee on Finance. 

On motion of Mr. Blackmar of Ward 11 — 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be requested to 
furnish a copy of his Inaugural Address, that the 
same may be juinted. 

On motion of Mr. Jones of Ward 14 — 

Ordered, That Thursday evening, at 71/2 o'clcck,bc 
the day and hour for the meetings of the Council un- 
til otherwise ordereJ. 

On motion of Mr. Perkins of Ward 6 — 

Ordered, That a committee of three, with such as 
the Board of Aldermen may join, be appointed to 
consider what disposition should be made of the sev- 
eral portions of the Mayor's address. 



Messrs. Perkins of Ward 6, Flynn of Ward 7 and 

West of Ward 16 wi re appointed the committee. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Waid 7 — 

Ordered, That a committee of Ihrec on the part of 
the Common (Council, with such as the Board of Al- 
dermen may join, be appointed to prepare .joint rules 
and orders tor the government of the City Council for 
the present munlciiial vear. 

Mcs-srs. Flynn of Ward 7, Shaw of Ward 5 and 
Dean of Ward 12 were appointed the committee. 

The same persons were also appointed a committee 
lO prepare rules and orders for the government of the 
Oimmon Ccuncil dining the present municipal year. 

On motion of Mr. Hughes of Ward 5 — 

Ordered, That the Clerk of the Common Council 
prejiare and cause to be printed a transcript of the 
journal of the proceedings ct the Council for the 
current municipal year. 

On motion < f Mi-. Dacey of Ward 2 — 

Ordered, That the municipal register be printed 
under the direction of the Joint Committee on Rulca 
and Orders, who may employ such assistance as may 
be deemed desirable. 

Mr. Prcscott of Ward 9 olfered the following order : 

Ordered, That the joint standing committees be 
directed to resume the unfinished business of last 
year which is appropriate to said several committees. 

Objections were made by Messrs. Perkins of Ward 
G and Shaw of Ward 5 to the passage of an order re- 
ferring matters to committees which have no exist- 
ence as vet; but in answer it was said, bv Messrs. 
Prescott,"Mahan of Ward 5 and West of Ward 16, 
that it was a customary srder. 

The order was amended on motion of Mr. Dean of 
Ward 12, by proviiling that "all untinished business 
bo referred accordingly." when it was ]jassed. 

Messrs. Thacher of Ward 15, Anderson of Ward 3, 
Morse of Ward 13, Marston of Ward 10, and Cud- 
worth of Ward 11, were joined to the Committee of 
the Board of Aldermen, to take charge of the small- 
pox hospital in Swett street. 

COMMITTEE ON ELECTIONS. 

Messrs. Bicknell of Ward 4, Burt of Ward IG, 
Hotnics of Ward G, Woods of Ward 8, and Train of 
Ward 13 were appointed the Committee on Elec- 
tiims. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Theodore Parsons end others, for a recount cf the 
votes in Ward 5. 

N. C. A. Prible, for a recount of the vote in Ward 
i)for the Common Council. 

The members f)roceeded to draw their seats. 

Adjourned to Thursday evening next, 1^2 o'clock. 

Board of Aldermen- 

ELECTION OF OHAIEMAN. 

On the return of the Board from convention, after 
the qualification of members, it was voted to proceed 
to the choice of chairman. 

Tjconard It. Cutter was elected Chairman by a unan- 
imous vote, and addressed the Board as follows: 

ADDRESS OF THE CHAIRMAN. 

Gcnnemen of the Board of Aliiermen — For the 
kindness and confidence shown in selecting me as the 
chairman of this Board, I beg you to accept my grate- 
ful acknowledgments. I properly appreciate the 
high trust and the responsibility imposed, as well as 
the honor conferred by it. Confidently relying upon 
your kindly co-operation, without which it were vain 
i:o hope for success, I accept the situation with a 
most earnest desire and a fixed determination to 
administer its functions, so far as I may be able, in 
such a manner that our deliberations nniy be pleas- 
ant to ourselves and profitable to our city, (lentlc- 
men, I await your )ileasure. 

Oil motion of Alderman Stebbins, the Clerk was 
directed to inform the Common C'juncil of the organ- 
ization of the Board by the ciioico of Leonard R. Cut- 
ter as Chairman. 

A message was received from the Common Council 
that the Council had organized by the choice of Ed- 
ward O. Shepard as president and Washington P. 
Gregg as clerk. 

On motion of Aldennan Gaftield. a message was 
sent to the Common Council projwsin., a convention 
forthwith for the election of a City Clerk for the pres- 
ent municipal year. 

The Board soon after i)roceeded to the Common 
Council Cliamber for a convention for the election of 
a City Clerk. 

The business of the convention being concluded, 
the Board returned. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman Clark — 
Ordered, That; the rules and orders of the Board of 
Aldermen of 187^ be adopted as the rules and orders 



CITY G^O VERI^MENT 



of the Board until otherwise ordered, and that Al- 
dermen Clark, Power and Qnincy be a committee to 
examine and report if any alterations are required 
therein. 

Aldermen Cutter and Sayward were joined to the 
committee of the Council to prepare joint I'ules for 
the government of the City Council during the pres- 
ent municipal year. 

The order of the Common Council for tlie printing- 
of the Mayor's address was concurred in. 

On motion of Alderman Power- 
Ordered, That the members of the Board of Alder- 
men and one member of the Common Council from 
each ward be a committee to determine and pay the 
allowances of State aid to the families of "disabled 
soldiers and sailors and the families of the slain." 
pursuant to the acts of the Legislature of this Com- 
monwealth ; and that the said committee have power 
to employ a [laymaster and sucU clerical assistants 
as may be required for this purpose; and that the 
expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for 
Soldiers' Kelief . 

On motion of Alderman Sayward — 

Ordered, That Mondays, 4 P. M., be assigned as the 
day and hour for holding the regular weekly meetings 
of this Board, until otherwise ordered. 

On motion of Alderman Cutter — 

Ordered, That a special committee, consisting of 
tlu'ee on the part of the Board,with such as the Com- 



mon Council may johi, be ai)pointed and authorized 
to exercise all the powers in reference to the Sulfolk- 
street District, conferred by the City CJouncil of 1872 
upon the committee in said district. 

Aldermen Cutter, Brown and Stebbius were aji- 
pointed on the part of this Board. 

On motion of Alderman Sayward — 

Ordered, That a joint special committee consisting 
of three members of the Board of Aldermen, and live 
members of the Connnon Council, be appointed to 
take charge of the smallpox hospital on Swett street, 
until the new Board of Health is ajipointed and or- 
ganized, as ijrovided by the ordinaiu'e relating to the 
public health, i>assed Dec. 2, 1872; and that said com- 
ndttee be authorized to complete saiil hospital liuild- 
ing. and i)rovide all the necessary furintnre and fix- 
tures, the expense to be charged to the appropriation 
for a Smallpox Hospital. 

Aldermen Sayward, Gibson and Bigelow were ap- 
pointed on said committee. 

COiMMlTTEE ON ACCOUNTS. 

The Board proceeded to an election of Committee 
(in Accounts, when John T. Clark, Thomas Gaffleld, 
and Solomon B. Stebbins were chosen on the part of 
this Board. 

Adjourned to Monday next at four o'clock, 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JAN. 9, 1873. 



The tirst regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council tor the year was held this evening, at 7l^ 
o'clock, Edward O. Shepard, the President, in the 
chair. 

A call of the roll showed 51 members i^resent, as 
follows : 

Abbott, Anderson, Barnes, Bicknell, Blackmar, 
Bleiler, Bowleg, Brennan, Burditt, Burt, Caton, Col- 
lins, Cudworth, Dacey, Dean, Denny, N. Doherty, T. 
H. Doherty, Edwards. Flatley, Flynn, Harrington, 
Hine, Holmes, Hughes, Jones, Kelley, Kingsley, 
Madden, Mahan, Martin, McCue, McKenney, Morse, 
Page, Pease, Perkins, Pickering, Powers, Prescott, 
Shaw, Shepard, Thacher, Urihara. Warren, West, 
Weston, Whiston, Wilbur, Woods, Woodward. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEK. 

The order for the appoiDtment of a Joint Conimit- 
tee^on the Suffolk-street District, was concurred in , and 
a committee was .iolnc.t as follows : Messrs. Prescott 
of Ward 9, Caton of Ward 11, Burditt of Ward 1(j, 
Marston of Ward 10. and Brennan of Ward 13. 

.soldiers' RELIEF COMMITTEE. 

The order for the appointment of a joint commit- 
tee to determine and pay the allowance of State Aid 
to "the famihes of disabled soldiers, and the families 
of the slain." was concurred in, and a committee was 
joined as follows: 

Ward 1, McKenney; 2, Dacey; 3, Abbott; 4, Pow- 
ers; 5, Mahan; 6, Hine; 7, Lamb; 8, Harrington; 
9, Denny ; 10, Brackett; 11, Blackmar; 12, Warren; 
13, Morse; 14, Davis; 15. Edwards; 1(5, Upham. 

COMMUKICATIOXS FROM THE MAYOR RELATIN(; TO 
.SMALLPOX. 

City Hall, Bosto--, Jan. 9. 1873. 

To the Honorable' the Citi/ Council: Gentlemen — 1 
ti'ansmit hei-ewith for your consideration the ojjinion 
of several distinguished physicians in regard to the 
])refent condition of the hospital accommodations for 
persons sick with smallpox in tliis city. It appears 
that the hospital on Swett street is capable of receiv- 
ing only one hundred )iatients. There are at the 
present time at least eight hundred persons sick with 
the disease. The larger number live in tenement 
houses, boarding houses or hotels. If will be impos- 
sible to eradicate the disease unlc.=s the persons so 
situated are sent to the hospital and the principle of 
isolation fully carried out. 

It is imperatively necessary, therefore, that addi- 
tional hospital accoiniTiodatl(ms should be ijrovided 
for temporary use. The building known as the '•Old 
Almshouse," in Roxbury, is the only one within my 
knowledge which can be made available immediately 
for the purpose desired. In the opinion of the phy- 
sicians there would be no danger to persons living in 
that vicinity or on the lines of communication. 

The exigency is such that I consider it my duty to 
ask you to furnish the means for pntting the building 
in proper condition for the reception of smallpox 
patients without delay. If the authorities are not 
obsti-ucted in the discharge of their duties I believe 
the eijidemic can be oromptly suppressed. 

Henry L. Pierce, Mayor. 

To Drs. (imnie ])erby. J. N. Borland, C. E. Buvk- 
inqham, H. IV. IViUlains, Henry J. BowdiicU and 
Ji. M. Hodges: Gentlemen — In order that prompt 
and efficient measures may be taken to eradicate the 
epidemic now prevailing in this city. 1 venture to call 
upon you for information upon the following points: 

1. Is the building just erected on Swett street 
(Ward 13) in a proper condition for the reception of 
persons sick with smallpox? 

2. Are additional hospital accommodations re- 
quired, and if so, to what extent? 

3. Would the building known as the Old Alms- 
house in Koxbnry be suitable for temporary use as a 
hospital? 

4. If proper care were taken in the transportation 
of the sick and in the management of the hospital, 
would there be any danger to persons living on the 
line of transportation or in the vicinity of the hospital? 

I am, gentlemen, with great respect, 
Yours truly. 

Henry L. Pierce. 

The following reply was received: 



Boston, January 7, 1873. 

To his Honor the Mayor of the City of Boston — We 
have received your communication of January 6, and 
respectfully present the following reply: 

In answer to the first question, we are of opinion 
that the Pine Island Hospital is very faulty, both in 
its location and construction ; but that under the 
present exigency it can at once be used with great 
advantage to the public health. It should be banked 
up to prevent the effect of fiost upon the water ser- 
vice, and better arrangements should be made for 
warming the wards and water closets, for protection 
against tire, and for washing. A detached building for 
the purpose of disinfecting bedding and clothing is 
very essential. 

In reply to the second question, we answer that 
additicmal accommodations to those offered at Pine 
Island are certainly needed, to what extent we have 
no certain means of judging. The Pine Island Hos- 
pital is capable of receiving one hundred patients. 

In reply to the third question, we find that the Ohl 
Roxbury Almshouse is well adapted for the imme- 
diute reception of one hundred and fifty patients. 

In reply to the fourth question we answer, after 
examination of the premises, that if proper care be 
taken, residents on the line of transportation or in 
the vicinity of these hospitals wiJl not be exposed to 
danger. 

[Signed] George Derby, 

Henry I. Bowditch, 

(JITARLES E. BUCKINCiHAM, 

Henry W. Williams, 
R. M. Hodges, 
J. Nelson Borland. 
City Hall, Boston, Jan. 9, 1873. 
To the Honorable the City Council: Gentlemen — I 
desire to call your attention to the necessity of 
amending the ordinance relating to the public health, 
passed the second day of Decemi)er, 1872, by striking 
out the provision in the tifth section which prevents 
the members of the Board of Health from engaging 
in other business. While the members will be re- 
(Uiired to give all the time necessary for the proper 
lierformaiicc of their duties, it can hardly be expect- 
ed that active business or professional men will con- 
sent to give up everything else to accept an office of 
an uncertain tenure. 

Henry L. Pierce, Mayor. 
Ordered to be sent up. 

petition presented and kefereed. 
Patrick Doherty and others, for a recount of the 
vote of Ward 2 for members of the (jomnum Council. 
Referred to the Committee on Electi(nis. 

RULES AND orders. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7, from the committee apjioint- 
ed to prepare rules and orders for the government of 
the Common Council during the present municipal 
year, made a report recommending the passage of 
the accompanying order: 

Ordered, That" the rules and orders of the last 
Common Council be adopted as the rules and orders 
of the present Common Council, with the following 
amendments, namely: 

Insert in the tirst line of the seventh section, after 
the word "whatsoever." the words "whether before 
or after the previous question has been ordered" ; also 
by striking out section 31) and inserting in place there- 
of the following: 

Section 39. Standing Committees on Elections, 
Police and Paving shall be ai>pointed at the begin- 
ning of the municipal year, and shall consist of five 
members each. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward G said he thought the report 
was well enough so far as it goes, but he believed 
that rule 7. requiring ono-tiftli of the members to order 
ti.e yeas and nays, and rule .i6, providing that no rule 
shall be suspended except by a two-thirds vote, 
should also be amended. It was often seen during 
the last year, that the whole body of the Council did 
not vote, as, for instance, iu the case of the Burrill 
claim, when two-thirds of the members in their seats 
did not vote for a suspension of the rules. It was a 
practice of t^ie President to count the members in 
their seats, and to state that two-thirds of the mem- 
bers present did not vote, while in his opinion the 
count should be the members who rise in resijonse to 
the call for a vote. 

It shou.ld not i)e assumed that those who were in 
their seats and did not vote were opposed to a 
measure, but if twenty voted in favor and ten against, 
it should be assumed as carried. He vs^onld move, 
therefore, to add after the word "present" in tho.se 
rules the words "and voting thereon." Questions 
uniraywrtant often come up, when no one would take 
tlie trouble to insist upon requiring all the members 
to vote. He woukl move, therefore, to add after the 



J A N IJ A R 1^ 



9 



18 7 3 



5 



word "prpsent" in rules 3 and 06, tlie words "and 
voting tlioroon." 

Mr. Holniop of Ward fi lioped tlie amendment would 
not prevail, for it way too often tlie custom to move a 
suspenfiion of the rules, and it proved injurious in 
hurrying tlirough liusiness*. In too many casees wer 
the rules suspended, and lie hoped tlie check, by re- 
quiriu}; a'two-thirds Vdte, would not be taken away. 

The vote I)eing taken and all the members not vot- 
ing, Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 called for tlie enforcement 
of the rule, in requiring all of the members to vote. 

Mr. Dean of Ward 12 called for a division of llie 
question. 

The Chair ruleil that it was tuo late, the question 
being on solving a doubt. 

Mr. Dean suggested that a division might be enter- 
tained by general consent. 

The Ciiair stated that the rule required the ques- 
tion of doubt to be sottled without debate. 

The motion to amend was lost, by a vote of 23 to 
33. 

The rules as reported were adopted. 

JOINT RULES AND OBDEKS. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7. from the .ioint spe(;ial cnni- 
mittee appointed to prepare rules and orders for the 
government of the City Council during the present 
municipal year, made a report recommending the 
passage of the following order: 

Ordered, That the rules and orders of the last City 
Council be adopted as the rules and orders of this 
City Council with the following amendment, namely: 

Insert in the first section, at the end of the list of 
joint standing committees, the following: "A Com- 
mittee on Health Department, to consist of two 
Aldermen and three members of the Common t!oun- 
eil." 

"A Committe on Armories and Military Aifairs, to 
consist of two Aldermen and thx'ee members of the 
Common Council." 

"A Committee on Salaries, to consist of two Alder- 
men and three members of the Common Council; 
iind it shall be the duty of said committee to report to 
the City Council, in the month of February or March, 
orders establishing the salaries of the several city of- 
ficers for the ensuing year; and the report of said 
committee shall designate particularly the changes, 
if any. proposed in said salaries." 

The report was accepted, and the joint rules and 
orders, as amended, were adopted. 

ELECTION OF COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS. 

Mr. Page of Ward 9, from the special committee 
to noniiiiate candidates for a Committee on Accounts 
on the part of the Common Council, made a report 
recommending the election of the following-named 
persons: 

William E. Bicknell, Henry W. Pickering, Wash- 
ington L. Prescott, James J. Flynn, Frederick 
Pease. 

The election was taken u)i by special assignment, 
at eight o'clock, when Messrs. Perkins of Ward C, 
Wilbur of Ward !J and Dolierty of Ward 2 were ap- 
pointed a commitee to receive and count the votes, 
the result being as follows: Bicknell, Pickering, 
Flynn and Pease by 58 votes each, and Prescott by 
a vote of 50. 

ELECTION OF COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. 

Mr. Pickering of Ward 6, from the special commit- 
tee appointed to nominate candidates for the Com- 
mittee on Finance, made a report, recomnieiKling the 
election of the following-named persons: 

Wilham H. West, George P. Denny. Charles Dar- 
row, Joshua Weston, Wilmon W. Blackniar, Benja- 
min Dean, Charles E. Powers. 

The Council proceeded to an election, by special 
assignment, at 8% o'clock. Messrs. Picke-ing of Ward 
6, Jones of Ward 14, and Martin oi Ward 7 acting 
as a committee to receive and count the votes. The re- 
sult was the choice of Messrs. West, Denny, and 
Dean, by a vote of 5Geach. and of Messrs. Dar- 
rovv, Weston, Blackmar and Powers, by .57 votes each. 

KEPORTS ON RECOUNT OF VOTES. 

Mr. Bicknell of Ward 4, from the Special Commit- 
tee on Elections, to whom was referred the petition 
of N. C. A. Preble for a recount of the votes cast for 
members of tlie Common (louneil at the last munic- 
ipal election in Ward 3. made a report that they 
have carefully recounted the original ballots in the 
possession of the City Clerk, with the following re- 
sult: 

Oeorge P. Kiugslsy had 6R7 

Thomas J. Ancerson 53!) 

■Tacob Abbott .5J7 

Michael K. Wells 46H 

N. C. A . Preble 468 

T. B. Towne 43fi 

J), (t. Wacnamara .j42 



Frank B. Clock 222 

(ieorge K. Curtis 135 

K. W. Ja-Ties 112 

V. O'Doheity 92 

K. S. Brown 19 

John B. Bailev IB 

A. E. Hohlen, C. C. French, T. B. Gaskill. S. 
Caunins, Jr., P. H. Shea, and John E. Qulnn, 
each 1 

It appears therefore, that George P. Kingsley, 
'I'homas J. Anderson, Jacob Abbott, and Michael F. 
Wells, who now occupy seats in the Common Coun- 
cil, were duly elected. 
The report was accepted. 

Mr. Bicknell of Ward 4, from the Committee on 
Elections of the Common Council, to whom was re- 
ferred the petition of Theodore Parsons and others, 
asking for a recount of the votes cast for members 
of the Common Council, at the last municipal elec- 
tion in Ward 5, made a report that they liave careful- 
ly recounte<l the original ballots in the possessirui of 
the City Clerk, with the following result: 

John W. Mahan had 405 

Francis M. Hughes 372 

Ueortue A. Shaw 349 

Kobfiit McCue 314 

Charles H. Bush 30B 

Alphonso J. Robinson 270 

Horace Loring 256 

George S. Bartlett 245 

Ames L. Noves 1«3 

George F. Walcott 28 

John A. Duergan 22 

William F. Watsou 14 

G. H. Walcot, Daniel Falvey, E. F. JVlaynard, 
J. J. Murphy and George W. BusteeJ. each. 1 
In the box containing the ballots there was a 
sealed envelope upon which were written the worjtls 
"Not counted." The envelope was found to contain 
eleven ballots pressed together in a peculiar manner, 
and bearing the appearance of having been fraudu- 
lently cast. The committee are of oijinion that the 
ward officers acted rightly in excluding these ballots 
from the returns, and they are not included in the 
result given above. It api)ears, therefore, that John 
W. Mahan, Francis M. Hughes, George A. Shaw and 
Kobert McCue, who now occupy seats in the Com- 
mon Council, were duly elected. 
The report was accepted. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 6 offered the following ordi- 
nance: 

Ordinance to amend an ordinance relating to the 
public health. 

Section 1. The ordinance relating to the public 
health, i)assed the second day of December, 1872, is 
hereby amended by striking out, after the word torth- 
witli. in 1,he seventh line of the lifth section, the 
words — ''they shall devote their time to those duties, 
and shall not actively engage in any other business." 
Mr. Perkins stated that this was a iiart of the 
measure to make the Board of Health effective, as 
I)roposed by the Mayor. He had been informed by 
the Mayor that it was determined to submit the 
nominations of members of the Board of Health to 
the Council this evening, but this was pr-evented by 
the declination of one of the proposed number. The 
health ordinance was passed hurriedly by the last 
("ity Council, and as this Council could not be con- 
.sidered as committed to the special provisions pro- 
(losed to be struck out, he hoped t!>e ordinance 
would be passed. 

The ordinance was read twice and pasEed, and a 
motion to reconsider was lost. 

COMMITTEES TO NOMINATE PUBLIC OFFICERS. 

Committees were a|)pointed as follows, on several 
niotion-i, severally to be joined by the Board of Alder- 
men, for the nomination of candidates for the ofrtces 
luuned: 

On nomination of Siiperinteiideut of Streets — Up- 
ham of Ward 10, Martin of Ward 7. Flatley of Ward 4. 

On nomination of Superintendent oi' Sewers — 
Thacher of Ward 15, Kingsley of Ward 3, Lamb of 
Ward 7. 

On iiomination of Superintendent of Public BiJId- 
ings— Wilbur of Ward !>, Bicknell of Ward 4, Tower 
of "Ward 1. 

On nomination of Superintendent of Common and 
Public Grounds — Dacey of Ward 2, Perkins of Ward 
6, and Edwards of Ward 16. 

On nomination of Suiieriutendent of Fire Alarms — 
Jones of Ward 14, Winston of Ward 8, Hughes of 
Ward 5. 

On nomination of Trustees of Pulilic Lilirary — 
Blackmar of M''aid 11, Holmes of Ward 0, Pease of 
Ward 1. 

On nomination of Board of Directors for Public 
Institutions— Prescott of Ward 9, Burt of Ward 10, 
Bowles of A\^nrd 12. 

On noiiiinatioi) of Directors of East Bo.iton Fcr- 



6 



COMMOlSr OOUNOIL, 



vies — Perkins of Ward G, Catoii of Ward 11, Tower 
of Ward 1. 

On iioniiiiatioii of a Water Board — Page of Ward !), 
Weston of Ward 1, Dean ofJWard 12. 

On nomination of Trustees of Mount Hope Ceme- 
tery — Blackniar of Ward 11, Sliaw of Wanl 5, Up- 
liam of Ward IG. 

On nomination of Superintendents of Bridge? — 
Burditt of Ward IG, Malian of \\ ard 5, "Warren of 
Ward 12. 

On nomination of Ballast Inspectors — Anderson of 
Ward 3, McKeaney of Ward 1, Collins of Ward 2. 

On nomination of Harbor Master — Wliiston of 
Ward 8, Hall of Ward Id, Madden of Ward 7. 

On nomination of City Messenger — Thacher of Ward 
15, Pease of Ward 1 , Brackett of Ward 10. 

Mr. Holmes of Ward 6 ottered an order for the ap- 
pointment of a committee to nominate a City Physi- 
cian, upon wliich the Chair stated that the election of 
City Physician was provided for nnder the Health 
ordinance. 

Mr. Marston of Ward 10 offered an order for the 
appointment of a committee to nominate a Chief and 
Assistant Engineers of the Fire Department. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 suggested that action at the 
present time was not desirable, while the investiga- 
tion into the management of the late fire was uncom- 
pleted. He hoped this ordor would lie over. 

On motion of Mr. -Jones of Ward 14, the order was 
laid on the table. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 offered the following order, 
which was read once: 

Ordered, That the joint special committee appoint- 
ed to prepare rules and orders for the government of 
the City Council be authorized to print said rules, to- 
gether with the rules and orders of the two branches 
and the organization of the City Government, and 
furnish copies thereof, suitably bound, to the mem- 
bers of the Government; the expense to be charged to 
the appropriation for Incidentals. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Mr. Page of Ward 9— 

Ordered, That the several heads of departments 
and boards of directors of the various institutions be 
authorized to submit their annual reports in print, 
under the direction of the Superintendent of Print- 
ing. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 6 offered the following : 

Ordered, That the Inspector of Buildings be and 
he IS hereby directed not to grant permits to build in 
Water street within the burnt district until author- 
ized to do so by the City Council or the Joii)t Stand- 
ing Committee" on Streets. 

Mr. Perkins stated in explanation that the Commit- 
tee on Streets and the Street Commissioners last 
year agreed to certain plans made by the City 
Engineer in regard to widening Water street, 
and as he presumed those members of the com- 
mittee who were now members of the Council 
had not changed their minds, and the citizens who 
were in favor of the measui'e would not wish to have 
them take a back track, this matter of the widening 
of the street should be held in abeyance until the 
Committee on Streets has fully considered it. To 
correct the action of the Street Commissioners, he 
had ottered this order. 

Mr. Denny of Ward 9 wished to know whether the 
Council could control the action of the Street Com- 
missioners in street widenings. 

Mr. Perkins replied that under the statute of last 
year the City Council could order the Street Com- 
missioners to carry out street improvements. 

The order was passed. 

ANOTHER SMALLPOX HOSPITAL. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 offered the following order : 

Oi'dered, That the joint special committee appointed 
under an order passed January 6, 1873, to take charge 
of the smallpox hospital on Swett street, be author- 
ized to repair and furnish the building known as the 
Old Almshouse in Roxbury, in a manner suitable for 
the purposes of a smallpox hospital ; and also to pro- 
vide all the supplies necessary therefor ; the expense 
to be charged to the appropriation for a Smallpox Hcs- 
pital. 

Mr. Kelley of Warn 15 stated that this measure 
was before the Council last year and was defeated, 
and he moved the indettnite i)Ostponement of the 
order. 

Mr. Blackmar of Ward 11, replied that a similar 
order was before the City Council last year, and did 
pass this branch, but was killed down stairs by the 
Board of Aldermen, The necessity of the measure 
was very pressing, and as he stated in the last Council 
the neglect to provide a suitable hospital for small- 
pox patients was a terrible crime. They were our 
citizens, and have a right to be cared for. 



The old almshouse, he had understood, had already 
been used as a pest house, and it was in every way a 
proper ijlace for a hospital. The Mayor had not act- 
ed hastily in recommending its use for the purpose, 
for he had consulted the best medical talent, care- 
fully conferring with them, and there should be no 
delay. Even should there be delay for investigation, 
it would be a loss of a week or ten days, which was 
of vital importance in stamping out the smallpox, as 
had been done in a sister city. The Mayor had asked 
t hem to act at once, and it would be in accordance 
with their former action, while the Board would not 
dare to thwart the action of the jjcople in carrying 
it out. 

Mr. Kelley said he had made a little mistake in his 
statement, but the taking of the almshouse for a hos- 
pital had been defeated in one branch of the City 
Council, and it made no difterence, for it ought to be 
defeated. If more hospital acconunodations were 
needed, they miglit increase the capacity of the pres- 
ent hospital, or if necessary have a hospital in every 
ward in the city. 

Mr. Dean of Ward 12 said it was undoubtedly true 
that every member of tlie Council would prefer jiot 
to have a hospital near his own residence, and the 
gentleman from Ward 15 believed he was looking 
after the interests of his constituents in objecting to 
the proposed use of the almshouse. But wo have 
pest houses in every ward, now, and to establish an- 
other hospital would be but concentrating these 
many pest houses into one. How stands the matter, 
now? There are from 600 or 700 to 1500 cases of 
smallpox in the city, and CRtimating five or six to 
each family or household where these cases exist, and 
these persons going abroad and mingling with others, 
we have some thousands of persons who aie liable to 
si>read and widen the extent of the disease. 

They could not wait for an increase of the disease 
before establishing another pest house. To enlarge 
the present one would require ten or twelve days, 
and it was a poor place not tit for a human being. 
The only spot we can Hnd, is where the Mayor recom- 
mends. Walking or riding, the disease meets us 
everywhere, and is constantly spreading. If it was 
only in the ward of the gentleman who objects, 
would he not say it was better to have one place for 
it? but they could njt have a pest house in every 
ward. There was but one place and this was the 
o)dy one. There would be the same argument and 
the same objection if it was to be located any where 
else. The exigency was such that it was utterly im- 
possible to hesitate a single moment, and there could 
be no excuse for not passing the order. 

Mr. Pickering of Ward 6 said there was no one 
who was not in favor of stamping out the disease, if 
that was the term, and the order should not be in- 
detinitely postponed. We have a hospital at Pine 
Island, yet there are 600 or 700 moie patients who 
should be provided for somewhere. There *ould not 
be hospitals in every ward, and with two we could 
make a good beginning towards stamping out the 
disease. 

The motion for indefinite postponement was lost, 
when the order was passed. 

A reconsideration was moved and lost. 

Mr. Mahan of Ward 5 ottered an order providing 
for the appointment of a committee of one from ea^^h 
ward on the part of the Council, with such as the 
Board of Aldermen may join, for the purpose of ex- 
tending aid to needy persons as may be deemed 
necessary; to be charged to the aiJpropriation for In- 
cidentals. 

Mr. Page of Ward 9 said thei'e was no necessity 
for the passage of such an order. He was on a com- 
mittee of a similar character, after the fire, and after 
a thorough consideration of the subject. Its duties 
were transferred to the Citizens' Committee, whose 
management had been satisfactory to all who solicit- 
ed aid. He had had no personal applications to him 
as a member of that committee, and believed that all 
the aid needed could be had from the Charity Bu- 
reau. He hoped, therefore, tbat the order would be 
indetiuately postponed. 

Mr. Mahan replied that the committee of last year 
may have been an excellent committee, yet there 
were many persons in his ward who needed aid. He 
did not however care to press the order now, but 
hoped it wouMjlie over to a future meeting, that it 
may be acted upon understandingly. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward G referred to the recommen- 
dation of the Mayor, on providing means of relief to 
the needy through the Overseers of the Poor. 

Mr. Page withdrew his motion, when tiieordsr was 
laid over. 

Adiourned. 



\ 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
JAN. 10, 1873. 



A special meeting of the Board of Aldermen was 
lieid at twelve o'clock, noon, today, Alderman Cutter, 
tbe Chairman, presidnig. 

The Chair stated that the Mayor had called a spe- 
cial meeting of tbe J3oard for the purpose of acting 
on several papers from the Common Council. 

PAPERS FROlt THK COMMON COUNCIL. 

The order from the Council for the adoption of the 
rules and orders of the City Council of last year until 
otherwise ordered, was passed in concurrence. 

The ordinance to amend the ordinance relating to 
the public health, by .striking out the provision in sec- 
tion 5, that the members of the board "shall not 
actively engace in any other business," as passed by 
the Common Council, was considered. 

Alderman Power said that, as he understood the 
order, it was designed to provide that members of the 
Board could engage in other kinds of business. As 
he had something to do with drawing up the ordi- 
nance, the provision proposed to be struck out was 
considered to be the most importau; one in the or- 
dinance. 

To make the Board of Heatth efficient, it was be- 
lieved that the members of the board should devote 
their entire time to the duties of the office. There 
should be some defining of the duties of the ottice, 
otherwise the duties will not be properly done. If 
the salary is not sufficient to get the right kind of tal- 
ent, then increase the salary. 

Alderman Gibson concurred in the views of Alder- 
man Power. If the members of the Board were to 
sit still and listen only to the reports of their run- 
ners, then the business will not be well done. They 
would not be willing lo spend more of their time than 
the members of this Board now do, for no compensa- 
tion. 

Alderman Clark favored the amendment as essen- 
tial to the efficiency of the board. There could be no 
objection to allowing a physician, merchant or other 
person from atieiuling to a little other business which 
might not interfere with his relations to the Hoard 
of Health, and which might not take up much time. 
The provision in (|uestion had been in the way of 
netting such a class of men as were needed, as shown 
in the efforts of the late Mayor. If they fail to do 
their work properly, they may be turned out of office. 

Alderman Sayward said it had been objected to the 
Board of Aldermen as a Board of Health, that they 
had too much business to attend to, and neglecteu 
health matters. He would accordingly insist that 
the members of this board sh.)uld devote their whole 
lime to this business. 

Alderman Power concurred with the remarks of 
Alderman Sayward relating to the complaints against 
the Board of Aldermen, and he thought the members 
of this board should be required to giva tlieir whole 
attention to the duties of the office. He would not 
object to a man's attending to his domestic affairs, 
and he believed that efficient men could be had at a 
salary of .'$41)00 a year. He had understood a compe- 
tent man, who had been engaged in a sirailar line of 
duties, was willing to take the offixe at the present 
salary. 

Alderman Quincy believed it wonld be better to 
have the efficient services of a man half the time 
rather than not to have efficient men in the office. 
He was wiUing to make the ellort in establishing the 
board under the most favorable circumstances, and 
was in favor of the amendment. 

Aldermen Clark and Powei continued tbe discus- 
sion on the point as to the extent which a nifn's ser- 
vices would be required in the duties of the office. 
The last named said that although heads of depart- 
ments devote their time to the interests of the city, 
and are at their offices during the hours of the day 
when they are expected to be there, it did not pro- 
hibit their doing private business at home. 

Alderman Quincy suggested tlwt an amendment 
should be made to inovide that the duties of this 
office should be paramount to all others, and with 
such duties well delined, there would be no difficulty 
relative to the performance of the duties of the office. 

Alderman (Jaffield referred to a question raised as 
to who were to be the judges whether a man lightly 
discharged his duties or not. There was a Board of 
Health last year, and it was supposed some of them 
were remiss in the discharge of their duties, and the 
Ijeople had shown their regard to such renussnesi'. 



There were three classes of persons who would judge 
whether their duties would be well performed or not, 
and if the Mayor and City Council did not see any 
work of efficiency, the people would demand their 
removal. 

Alderman Sayvvard further spoke on the subject of 
remissness in "the discharge ot duties in relation to 
health. Great complaints had been made against 
tlie Board of Health of last year. Yet, after a dis- 
cussion of six months, and before anything was done, 
they ask for a change in the ordinance. 

Alderman Hulbert said he had an impression that 
too much stress had been laid upon scientitic attain- 
ments. There was work enough to do, and while this 
city had a good reputation for cleanliness it could not 
be considered beyond the reach of criticism. The 
city was growing fast, and much work w;is to be 
done in keeping the city in the condition in which it 
should be. Good, iiracHcal men should be secured, 
and reliance should not be placed on a Board to sit iii 
the City Hall and give orders. He was opposed to 
the amendment. 

Alderman Gibson did not believe that parties 
should be employed at large salaries to sit in the City 
Hall and employ others to do the work. They should 
be men who will be willing to go through the streets 
and alleys of the city, and see to the performance of 
all the duties of the office. 

The ordinance was passed in concurrence, by a vote 
of 7 to 5, as follows . 

Yeas — Bigelow, Clark, Cutter, Emery, Gaffleld, 
Quincy, Stebbins. 

Nay's— Brown, Gibson, Hulbert, Power, Sayward. 

Tlie Chair submitted a communication of the 
Mayor, appointing as members of the Board of 
Health, the following-named persons: 

Alonzo W. Boardman to hold office to 1st Monday 
inMay, 187G; Dr. S. H. Durgin to hold office to 1st 
Mondav in Mav, 1875; Albert T. Whiting to hold 
office to 1st Monday in May, 1874. 

Alderman Ga,ffieid moved that the nominations lie 
over, to allow members of the Board to become 
more familiar with their qualifications, believing 
that nothing would be lost bv the delay, because 
the action of the Council could not be had until 
after the next meeting of this Board. 

Aldermen Sayward and Clark opposed delay, be- 
ieving that the nominations should be acted upon 
at once, since a demand had been made for a new- 
Board of Health, and they were willing to trust the 
Mayor as to the qualifications of the persons named. 

Alderman Clark said there could be no doubt of the 
qualitication of Dr. JDurgin, whose services had been 
very valuable to the city, and Mr. Whiting was well- 
known as a retired business man. 

Alderman Sayward said he had known Mr. Whit- 
ing for many years, and believed him to be well 
iiualitied for the' office. 

Alderman Power f urt"lier objected to acting upon 
nominations without knowing the qualifications cf 
the persons nominated. 

Alderman Hulbert said he sliouhl never give his 
vote for any nomination without personally knowing 
something of the qualifications of the persons to be 
appointed. He should therefore vote to lay the nom- 
iii'itions over. 

The motion to lay the nominations on the table pre 
vailed. 

NEW SMALLPOX HOSPITAL. 

The order from the Common Council providing for 
taking and fitting up the old almshouse at Koxbury 
for a smallpox hospital, was taken up for considera- 
tion. 

Alderman Power said he was sorry to he obliged to 
vote against the first recommendation of the Mayor. 
A similar order had twice been defeated by the 
Board, the last time unanimously, when the exigen- 
cies were supposed to be greater than ever before. 

It had been stated, as he understood, by stmie per- 
sons who objected to the Swett-street hospital, that 
it was unfit because it was a swampy location. But 
the same objection could be made to the whole of the 
Back Bay. The accommodations on the Swett-street 
territory could be greatly enlarged, if necessary, and 
more la'nd could be had at the same rate of cost. 
There were no special reasons in favor of the Alms- 
house, and another hospital could be erected as soon 
as this can be altered to make it fit for a hospital. 

Alderman Power further objected to the locality on 
account of its proximity to the Academy of Notre 
l^ame, where pupils must be scattered by the estab- 
lislnnent of a hospital there, and the property in the 
neighborhood would he ruined. It would be an out- 
rage to plant a hospital there, and the order should 
he rejected, as it was before. 

Alderman Gaffield said he was in favor of this rec- 
ommendation of the Mayor, because he believed it to 



JANUARY 10 



187 



3. 



8 



be a good one. Objecfion liad been made that 200 or 
300 persDiis uiiaht be discoinmoded, yet tliere 
were 200,000 wbo were now disconnnod-ed and 
exposed to smallpox. The fact of the passage of the 
order so unanimously by the (Joninion Couiieil was 
some reason hi favor of its passage here, and he hoped 
it would be coiieurreit iu. 

Aldennan Uulbertsaid he felt to be in a delicate 
position, as a resident of the tliglilands, in opposing 
the passage of this order. Yet he believed he shouUl 
oppose this were lie not a resilient in that section. 
The people in tiiat section of the city had been mucli 
excited on tlic sub.iect, and if tliis place should be 
used as a hospital, others would be required. There 
were, in many sections of the city, isolated houses 
\vliich might be used as pest houses, and he hoped 
this order would not be passed. 

Alderman Quincy compared tliis disease to that of 
a conflagration, which might be controlled in theout- 
sec, but which if neglected, would get beyond control. 
The last Legislature passed an act allowing persons 
to be removed from liotels, boarding liouses. tenement 
houses, etc., but no removals could be made from 
private dwellings. There was a need of the hospital 
for temporary purposes, and he hoped the order 
would pass. 

Alderm rn Power objected to setting fire in a new 
place because buildings were on fire, and as to ac- 
commodations there was room enough in the Swett- 
street locality. It was remote from other places; 
there was no objection to it, and it was the most fit 
place for a hospital. 

Alderman Quincy read from the communication of 
the physicians consulted by the Mayor, as tending to 
show that there was no danger to the residents in the 
vicinity of the Almshouse, in locating a hospital 
there. 

Alderman Power said the feelings of physicians 
could be appreciated iu sudi matters, and while they 
might not have any fear, other people were afraid. 

Alderman Gibson opposed the order, believing that 
all the liospitals should be together, for their better 
management. Before taking action, a visit should be 
made to the locality. 



Alderman Power further opposed tlie order, con- 
tcniling that the subject should be looked into more 
fully before action was taken. 

Alderiiian Sav ward did not doubt but more hospi- 
tal accommodations would be needed, and on the oc- 
cupation of the Swett-street hospital, no more per- 
sons would be willing to go to Gallop's Island. 

Alderman Gibson advocated erecting wings or other 
buildings at Swett street, to accommodate all who 
might need hos|iital lacililies. 

Alderman Clark believed the Board should visit 
both locations. He was satisfied that the Swett-street 
location was the best which could be had, and if the 
first buildiug had not been burnt, it would have af- 
forded accommodations for two hundred persons. 
He had twice voted against the occupation of the 
almshouse as a hospital, and did not wish to inocu- 
late any other neighborhood with the smallpox. His 
belief was 1 hat a flag shoidd have been displayed 
wherever the smallpox existed, and if it had been 
done, the disease might have been stayed. He did 
not know whose fault it was that the measure was 
not adopted. 

On motion of Alderman Power, the order was 
laid oil the table. 

It was voted to visit the hospital this afternoon, 
and the suggestion being made that it might be occu- 
pied with patients today, the assurance was given that 
it would not. 

Alderman Stebbins offered the following order, 
which was adopted : 

Ordered, That the City Physician be requested to 
communicate to this Board \^ hether additional hos- 
pital accommodations are needed for the reception 
and treatment of persons sufiiering from contagious 
diseases. 

Alderman Clark offered, as an amendment, an in- 
quiry why smallpox tiags had not been displayed 
where the disease prevailed, in accordance with an 
order of the Board. 

The amendment was rejected. 

Adjourned. 



9 



BOAIiD OF ALDERlVtEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen , 

JANUARY 13, 187a. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Alder- 
meu was held this afteruooii, at four o'clock. Mayor 
Pierce presiding. 

JUSOBS DRAWN. 

Five traverse jurors were drawn for the Superior 
Court for criminal busine.<s. 

APPOINTMENT MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Member of Fire Department— Joseph Abbcnzella 

RIIXES AND ORDERS. 

Alderman Clark, from the CJommittee to prepare 
Rules and Orders for the government of the Board 
of Aldermen during the i)resent municipal year, 
made a report recommending the passage of the 
accompanying order: 

Ordered", That the rules and orders of the last Board 
of Aldermen be adopted as the rules and orders of 
this Board, with the following amendment, namely: 

Strike out in the seventh Tine of the twenty-third 
section as printed in the Municii)al Register for the 
year 1872, the words, "Armories and Military Affairs." 
insert after the word "hall" in the ninth line of said 
section the words, "and county buildings." Strike 
out in the tenth line of said sectiim the word "health." 
Strike out in the eleventh line of said section the 
words, "bells and clocks" and also the word "jail." 

The report was accepted, and the rules and orders 
were adopted. 

The report adopting joint rules for City Council of 
1873, from the Common Council, was adopted in con- 
currence. 

The Mayor announced the several standing com- 
mittes, as' follows: 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Bridges— Cutter, Gibson, Power. 

Cemeteries — Stebbius, Hulbert, Quincy. 

County Accounts— Quincy, Stcbbins, Hulbert. 

Faneuil Hall and County Buildings— Sayward. Gib- 
son, Emery. 

Lamps— Brown, Emery, Hulbert. 

Licenses — Sayward, Bigelow, Stebbius. 

Market. Weiglits and Measures— Gibson, Gaffield, 
Browni. 

Paving— Cutter, Power, Hulbert. 

Police— Gibson, Cutter, Clark. 

Sewers — Po\\'er, Bigelow, Gaffield. 

Steam Engines— Power, Emery, Brown. 

Streets— Clark, Gaffield, Hulbert. 

.lOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Armories— Quincy, Clark. 

As,sessor's Department— Brown, Cutter, Stebbins. 

Bathing— Power, Gaffield. Gibson. 

Common, etc.— Clark, Power, Bigelow. 

Claims— Cutter, Gaffield, Quincy. 

East Boston Ferries— Emery, Hulbert, Stebbins. 

Engineer's Department— Bigelow, Cutter. 

Fire Department— Cutter, dark, Stebbins. 

Fire Alarms — Gibson, Power. 

Fuel — Sayward, Emery. 

Harbor—Power, Gibson. 

Health— Sayward, Gibson. 

City Hospital- Clark, Hulbert. 

Institutions at South Boston and Deer Island— Hul- 
bert. Power, fUitter. 

Legislative Business— Qiiincy, Stebbins. 

Mount Hope Cemetery— Hulbert. Quincy. 

Ordinances— Quincy, Bigelow, ('utter. 

Overseers of the Poor — Brown, Bigelow. 

Public Buildings— Saj^vvard, Gibson, Emery. 

Riblic Instruction — Gaffield, Sayward, Cutter. 

Public Lands — Emery, Stebbins, Brown. 

Public Library— Quincy, Emery, Hulbert. 

Printing— Power, Gaffield. 

Salaries — Stebbins, Gaffield. 

Streets— Clark, Gaffield, Hulbert. 

Surveyors' Department— (iafticld. Brown. 

Survey and Inspection of Buildings — Gibson, Say- 
ward. 

Treasury Department — Hulbert, Gaffield. 

Water — Stebbins, Clark, Bigelow. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Joseph R. Grose, for leave to occupy a wooden 
stable for two horses rear of oM Dorchester avenue. 

John Barry, for leave to occupy a wooden stable for 
eight horses rear 392 Commercial street. 



Henry Spilker, for leave to occupy a wooden stable 
for one horse on marsh near Ward street. 

H. A. Stevens and others, against the stable of 
Robert Crosby on White street. 

A. P. Poole, for leave to occupy a wooden stable 
for one horse on Humphreys street. 

Charles C. Holbrook and others, for the continua- 
tion of public vaccination in Ward 10. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Health 
of this Board. 

Company P, First Infantry, for location of their 
armory in the new engine house in Roxbury. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Armories. 

Caroline T. Noiris. to be paid for land taken to lay 
out Washington avenue, in Chelsea. 

Thomas L. Hallworth, to be paid for land taken to 
y\ideu Washin<^ton avenue in Chelsea. 

Severally referred to Committee on County Ac- 
counts. 

Great Western Despatch Company, to be paid for 
loss of property by fire. 

I). Lothrop & Co., to be paid for loss of property 
at, the recent Are by reason of the conduct of agents 
of the city. 

Hold en & Maguire, to be paid for contract work on 
the tirst smallpox hospital. 

James Mullen, to be paid for injuries done by a 
fall on the ice on the sidewalk in Water street. 

Severally referred to Committee on Claims. 

Middlesex Railroad Company, for extension of lo- 
cation through Washington street extended to Hay- 
market square. 

Stillman A. Tucker, for the grade of Washington 
street. Ward 16, near the railroad. 

H. G. Plinn and others, that some street in East 
Boston be assigned for coasting purposes. 

Severally referred to Committee on Paving. 

John Nugent, for employinent in the Smallpox 
Hospital. Referred to Committee on Smallpox Hos- 
pital. 

Massachusetts Homcfopathic Medical Society, that 
immediate measures be taken for the erection of an 
additional smallpox hospital. Referred to Committee 
on Health. 

Aaron D. Webber for abatement of assessment for 
a sewer in South street. Referred to Committee on 
Sewers. 

P. H. Underwood and others, for a clock upon the 
new schoolhouse in Ward 12. Referred to Commit- 
tee on Fire Alarms, etc. 

Boston Coiiperative Associatiop, that a new bond 
for land sold be substituted to replace one injured by 
lire. Referred to Committee on Public Lands. 

Patrick Muhey, for abatement of Harrison -a venue 
betterments. 

Michael Connors and Joseph Griffin, for apportion- 
ment of Harrison-avenue betterments. 

Severally referred to Committee on Streets. 

James W. Fenno. for license as an auctioneer. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Licenses. 

A communication was received from the Metropoli- 
tan Raih-oad Company accepting the location on 
Charles street, with turnouts, granted by the Board 
of Aldermen December 23, 1872. Ordered to be 
placed on flle. 

A notice of proposed sale of unclaimed baggage by 
the Boston & Albany Railroad Company, with a re- 
quest for approval, was referred to Aldermen Steb- 
bins and Bigelow, with full powers. 

A communication was received from P. R. Guiney, 
Register of Prf)bate, with reference to classification 
of probate papers, in which he says, "The city has 
already expended nearly $1:^,000 under improvident 
contracts in reference to the adjustment of the flies 
of this office; that in his opinion not a dollar of said 
sum has been earned or legally paid to the contract- 
ing parties; that it is necessary the work contem- 
plated by tliese contracts should be speedily accom- 
plished; that your honorable Board will refuse to ex- 
pend any further sum under or in reference to the 
subject matter of the said contracts until the under- 
.sigued has had an opportunity of being heard in ref- 
erence to the same." 

Referred to Committee on County Accounts. 

comjeunioation from the city physician. 

City Physician's Office, ) 
Boston, Jan. 11, 1873. { 
To the Hmiorable fJi£ Board of Alde'mien: Gentle- 
men — I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of 
the order asking wliat additional accommodations are 
required for the treatment of smallpox patients. In 
re]jly I would say tliat there is still need of one hun- 
dred and fifty beds for such cases. 

Very respectfully, your ob't serv't, 

Samuel A. Green, 

City Physician. 
Read and placed on file. 



JANUARY 13, 1873. 



10 



QUARTERLY REPORT OF THE PORT PHYSICIAN. 

The quarterly report of Dr. S. II. Durgin, Port 
Physician, for the quarter ending Dec. 31, 1872, gives 
tlie following statements: 

The whole number of vessels examined during tlie 
quarter was 97 — steamers, 12; ships, 7; barques, 27; 
brigs, 82; schooners, 19. No sickness of a contagious 
cliaracter was found on board these vessels and no 
unusual detention caused at tlie station. 

There were remaining in the smallpox hospital at 
Gallop's Island on the 1st day of October, 15 patients. 
There have been admitted during the quarter ;iS«. 
Total number treated during the quarter, ;^5.S. Of 
these 130 have died; 135 have been discharged, and 8K 
remain in hospital January 1, 1873. Smallpox is the 
only disease admitted to the hospital during the quar- 
ter. In Ofi cases vaccination had never been performed 
at all, and in 22 others it was found to be very doiibt- 
ful. Five had smallpox once before. Only four of 
the whole number presented scars of vaccination 
within two years. $(i23 have been collected (.flO of 
which proved counterfeit) on account of fees for 
boarding vessels, and paid to the CMty Treasurer. A 
large number of board bills for smallpox patients are 
now in process of collection, many of which belong- 
ing to the State, will be paid in a few days. 

Ordered to be sent down. 

QUARTERLY REPORT OF PAYMASTER OF STATE AID. 

The quarterly report of the Soldiers' Relief Com- 
mittee gives the receipts and payments of State aid 
as follows: 

Balance on hand Oct. 1 $551 

Received from City Treasurer at various times 

during the C|uarter 120,000 

$20,551 
Disbursed to disabled soldiers and sailors and their 

families $20,236 

Balance on hand Jan. 1, 187.S $:^ir) 

The number of applicants in the several wards and 
the aggregate payments were as follows: 



Wards. 

1 


Oct. 

88 


2 


..114 


3 


78 


4 


54 




. 103 


ti 


'14 




..169 


8 


75 


9 


44 


10 


. 54 


11 


fi;^ 


12. 


. . 61 


18-15 

IB 


. 160 

40 


Out of State. 

U.S. Navy... 


.. 35 

.. 54 



APPLICANTS 






Nov. 


Dec. 


Total Amount. 


77 


87 


$1396 


113 


112 


1903 


68 


69 


1275 


52 


54 


883 


109 


104 


1785 


37 


38 


620 


171 


169 


2770 


66 


80 


1179 


48 


47 


661 


56 


59 


934 


62 


60 


977 


59 


64 


104,5 


155 


156 


2638 


4tl 


45 


641 


38 


36 


©8 


50 


55 


891 



1231 1201 

Ordered to be sent dowai. 



12^ 



20,236 



REPORTS OF SUPERINTENDENTS OP BRIDGES. 

The report of Superintendent of Meridian-street 
Bridge gives 2007 as the number of vessels passing 
the draw of that bridge du.ing the past year. 

The Superintendent of Chelsea-street Bridge re- 
ports 26 vessels as having passed the draw of that 
b.idge in 1872. 

The Superintendent of Dover-street Bridge reports 
the number of vessels passing the draw of that 
bridge last year as follows: January, 225; February, 
175; March, 185; April, ,5.50; May". 985; June, 775; 
July, 950; August, 990; September, 892; October, 897; 
November, 742; December, 684. Total— 8050. 

The Superintendent of Mount Washington-avenue 
Bridge reports the number of vessels which passed 
the draw of that bridge in 1872 as follows: January. 
356; February, 2.34; March, 1^1; April, 927; MaV, 
1.500; June, li:33: July, 1.547; August, 1604; Septem- 
ber, 1405; (irctober. 1.54.3; November, 1308; December, 
921. Total, 12,819. 

The Superintendent of the Federal-street Bridge 
reports that 11,002 vessels passed the draw of that 
bridge during the past year. 

Severally ordered to be sent down. 

PAPERS FROSt THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

The following papers were passed in concurrence : 

Order to refer unfurnished business to joint stand- 
ing^ committees. 

Order for Superintents of Departments and Boards 
of Directors, under City Government, to present 
their annual reports in prints. 

Order for Inspector of Bnildings to refuse permits 
to build on Water street until further notice. 

The order tr) prepare and print the Municipal Reg- 
ister for 1873 was amended, on motion of Alderman 
GaflBeld, by adding "also a pocket edition of the 
rules and orders of the City Government.'' 



COMMITTEES .JOINED. 

Aldermen Quincy and Stebbius were joined to the 
Committee on the Disposition of Topics in the May- 
or's Address. 

The followinji committees were joined on the 
several orders tor the appointment of committees 
of nominations for Boards and Heads of Depart- 
ments: 

To nominate Directors of East Boston Ferries — 
llulbert, Gibson. 

City Messenger — Gibson, Say ward. 

Ballast Inspectors — Sayward, Emery. 

Trustees of Public Library— Bigelow, Clark. 

Superintendent of Streets — Cutter, Bigelow. 

Harbor Master — Power, Stebbins. 

Superintendent of Sewers — Power, Gaffield. 

Superintendent of Public Buildings — Sayward, Gib- 
son. 

Cochituate Water Board— Bigelow, Quincy. 

Directors for Public Institutions — Gaffield, Steb- 
bins. 

Superintendent of Bridges— Gibson, Power. 

Superintendent ,of Fire Alarms — Stebbins, Hul- 
bert. 

Trustees of Mount Hope Cemetery — Emery, 
Brown. 

Superintendent of Common, etc. — Clark, Power. 

REPORT OF A COMMITTEE. 

Alderman Sayward, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of licenses, as follows: O. 
B. Daily, to exhibit his "Mirror of Ireland" at Insti- 
tute Hall, 17th and 18th inst. ; Mark Salom and Con- 
stant F. Drury as auctioneers. Severally accepted. 

MILITARY PAYMENTS. 

Alderman Quincy offered the following order: 

Ordered, That there be paid to each member of the 
Volunteer Militia embraced in the organizations re- 
cited in the certificate of the Adjutant-General, dated 
January 7, 1873, the amount allowed to him thereby 
for special duty in this city in November last, the 
whole amounting to $11,2.50; to be charged to the 
appropriation for Militia Bounty. 

Alderman Power inquired whether this order had 
been considered by any committee, or came from the 
Committee on Military Affairs. 

Alderman Quincy replied that the payment was in 
the usual form under a certification from the office of 
the Adjutant-General. 

Alderman Power moved its reference to the Com- 
mittee on Military Affairs, which was carried. 

Subseciuently, on motion of Alderman Power, the 
reference was reconsidered, and the order was 
passed. 

SMALLPOX HOSPITAL. 

Alderman Clark offered the following order:' 

Ordered, That the joint special committee ap- 
pointed to take temporary charge of the Smallpox 
Hospital on Swett street be authorized to erect ad- 
ditional hospital buildings on the lands owned by the 
city on Swett street; and that they be further author- 
rized to purchase buildings already erected and re- 
move them to said lands; and also to furnish the 
buildings erected or moved upon said lands suitable 
for the purposes of a smallpox hospital ; the expense 
to be charged to the appropriation for a Smallpox 
Hospital. 

Alderman Gaffield urged that before the order 
should be passed, the order which had been laid on 
the table for taking the old almshouse in Roxbury for 
a hospital, should be taken up and acted upon. Since 
the former action of the Board, they had visited the 
new hospital at Swett street, which he considered a 
marvel of construction for the short time in which it 
was built, and it reflected much honor upon the last 
Board of Aldermen and the committee which had it 
in charge. The building was warm, well ventilated, 
and in good condition. 

On this subject they were getting new light every 
day, and he confessed he had changed his opinions. 
While he bclie^'ed that additional accommodations 
could be secured adjoining the new hospital, he 
thought they should not make them until they had 
taken the almshouse for a hospital. In regard to the 
almshouse he had consulted with citizens of Rox- 
bury, and was urged by others, to take that building. 
In no way, except by a heroic act of immediate action, 
could they succeed in stamping out this dreaded dis- 
ease. 

Since he made his remarks at the last meeting of 
the Board he had been asked if he expected to go to 
Heaven after such a speech. He had no fears of any 
scorching in this kind of weather, nor so long as be 
conscientiously discharged his duty, as he believed 
he did in this matter. After consulting with the City 
Physician and others, he was of opinion that they 
should take the almshouse. With reference to the 
objections by the people of Roxbury, before auuexa- 



11 



BOAIir> OF ALDER/MEISr. 



tion they had a pest house within flfty feet of the 
almshouse, wlicn it was occupied by women and 
children, and that was as near to the almshoixse as 
the almshouse is now to the street. 

Physicians of good standing had told him there was 
no danger from smallpox at 'a distance of fifty feet, 
and others had said there was no danger at even less 
than that distance. There had heen undue fear lest 
the disease could be taken by passing vehicles with 
patients, in the street, but there could be ncme with 
proper care, and such care there woxild be. The citi- 
iiens require that this Board should todaj- and now 
take effective measures for the suppression of this 
disease. Although he had modified his opinion twice 
he was read.v to stand by his views expressed in favor 
of taking the almshouse. 

Go wliere th(^y might, there would be ()))jections to 
the location of a liospital, and if they did not soon 
do somethijig, it would soon affect the l)iisiness of 
the city. Tliere were wrong impressions as to the 
extent of the disease, there being but 400 or .500 cases. 
The City Physician was of opinion that tliere were 
not over 550 cases, and the Chief of Police agrees 
upon very nearly the same number. The two hos- 
pitals would accommodate about 250 persons. In 
making use of the almshouse, it would not be nec- 
essary to tear it to pieces, for there were both large 
and small rooms, and it ought to be taken today. 
If not d(me, it would be a great mistake, and it 
would excile the indignation of the community. 

Alderman (Jnincy fa\'ored the measure of "taking 
the Koxbury Almshouse. Were the Board providing 
for a state of things which might come a month, 
three weeks or a fortnight hence, he would advocate 
tlie enlargement of the Swett-street Hospital; but 
■there was no denying the fact that the exigency was 
one calling for instant action. The disease, tliough 
exaggerated in some of the papers, was spreading 
from hour to hour, and the duty of the City (to\ eni- 
ment to employ v\ ithout delay the means actually un- 
der their hands to avert it was recognized most un- 
mistakably by the public. That a clamor should be 
raised against tlie measure by those who live near the 
building proposed to be taken was but natural; but 
if the interests of the whole city involved in the spread 
or check of the disease is shown to be in the other 
scale, was it not clearly the duty of the Board to 
disregard such clamor, whether it came from Rox- 
buryi Beacon street or the Black Sea? It was a 
mistake to assume that the disease was only raging 
at the North End, and that the establishment of this 
hospital would be like setting fire in a new quarter. 
The disease reached the Highlands ten days a^o. 
cases llieu having come to the speaker's knowledge 
near the corner of Milmont street. How far it had 
since spread he did not know, but throught it not un- 
reasonable lo assume that it might be found if not 
within a stone's throw, certainly within a rifle shot of 
the building proposed to be taken. Every building 
within the city which now contains cases of smallpox 
unknown to the public is a pest house of the most 
deadly nature, for it is one into which our daily avo- 
cations may take us unsuspectingly at any instant, and 
with the children from which our boys and girls may 
be now playing in the street. It seems that the dis- 
play of the red flag cannot by law be compelled bj' 
the City Physician, and what tradesman, for in- 
stance, whose- shop is in his dwelling, wishes to 
infoi'm his cixstomers that he has a case of 
smallpox up stairs. Now do the citizens of the 
Highlands prefer to risk the indefinite multiplication 
of private pest houses into whose open doors they 
may walk daily without suspicion rather than to re- 
, gard from afar one large, isolated building, known, 
feared and avoided by all, a building into which not 
even the foolhardj' who desired it would be allowed 
to enter unless on urgent business and with every 
precaution, a building whose necesssary intercourse 
with the outside world would be sub.iected to every 
safeguard which the resources of science ha\'e at com- 
mand? No, sir. It is the pestilence which walketh 
in darkness which is now ravaging our city, and to 
those whose local interests lead them to oppose the 
measures b)' which it is to be dragged to light and 
stamped out, we should turn a deaf ear. If the tem- 
porary occupation of this building should for a time 
serioiisly affect the price of real estate in its vicinity, 
is that a consideration which should outweigh the 
salvation of human life? 

Alderman Clark said he did not expect his order to 
call forth such eloquent remarks, for it was a ques- 
tion only of making additional accommodations at 
the Swett-street locality. In ten days they could 
have accommodations for one hundred more patients. 
There was one building which could be purchased 
which would accommodate sixty, and it could be 
moved and fitted up in six days; and the old smallpox 
hospital could be moved and accommodate twenty- 



five or fifty more. It was not a question of the Eox- 
bury Almshouse, but of making preparations at once 
for additional accommodations, and his ob.iect in of- 
ferhig the order was that the committee might com- 
mence toniglit in securing the possession and removal 
of the buildings he had referred to. 

It may be that the City Physician tliiuks the num- 
ber of cases wUl not exceed B50, but something 
should be done to allay the feelings of the public. It 
might be necessary that the Roxbury Almshouse 
should some tune be taken, but there was room on 
Pine Island, and it might be desirable to have a hos- 
pital somewhere else — back of the jail or even the Sail- 
ors' Home — yet the question was now whether they 
should increase the accommodations at Swett street. 

Alderman Power said it appeared to ])e of no con- 
sequence in the \'iews of some gentlemen to sacrifice 
the property of citi/.cns, but he"l)clieved the sacrifice 
should be made by the city and not by. individuals, as 
it would be to go to Roxbury. There was no reason 
why they should go to Roxbury, for the additional 
facilities at Swett street would be ample. There 
wei'e but thirty patients in tliat hospital, and before it 
would be' filled they could put up additional build- 
ings. 

Alderman Stebbins said he wished to say a word on 
the other order, which was on the table. 

The Chair said there would be no objection, since 
the discussion had been quite general. 

Alderman Stebbins said he would like to ask a few 
(|iiestions of Dr. Webb, the Superintendent of the 
Swett-street Hospital, witli the consent of the Board. 

Alderman Cutter inquired why he did not call the 
City Physician. 

.Alderman Stebbins said he would, but he was de- 
sirous of asking Dr. Webb some questions, and at 
his request a motion was ]iut and carrii'd to allow 
t lie questions to be asked. 

Dr. Webb, in answer to these questions, said there 
were tliirty-two ])atients in the hospital this morning, 
and five had been added since. The hosjiital at Swett 
street was not all that was desired; did not know how 
much more ground there was in the vicinity which 
might be occupied for additional hospital purposes, 
but there was none within the fence; the place was 
not suitable (m account of its low and damp situa- 
tion, the sewers constantly emptying in there; and 
its cft'ect would be greater in warm weather. 

A hospital located in the old almshouse would not 
endanger the health of residents in the neighborhood, 
with the use of ordinary care, and it would be better 
for tlie health of the patients; the Swett-street Hos- 
pital has 11(1 small wards; the bad smells spoken of 
are outside of the yard; the building is not so high 
and is nearer to the water than the old one on Albany 
street; a new building would not be safe except oii 
piles, and the health would be much more likely to 
lie restored elsewhere than at Swett street; did not 
think fa\()rably of the Swett-street location, nor of 
the ariaugemeiit of the wards, there being but two 
with fifty beds in each; cases in dift'erent stages of 
the disease should be separated by different wards, 
whikvnow, those ^\'ho were dangerously sick and the 
convalescent, were all together, and the moral effect 
is bad where the dying are in full \ie\\^ of those who 
are slightly sick. 

In one case he said there was a woman there who 
did not have I he smallpox, and in answer to Alder- 
man Power, he said he was not the admitting physi- 
cian, and did not know who sent her there, or where 
slie came from. The difference between this and the 
City Hospital was that they had a variety of rooms, 
in which they could classify the patients." 

Alderman Power called for the previous question,- 
to which Alderman Stebbins replied that he had not 
yii'Ided the floor, and the motion was withdrawn. 

Dr. Green, City Physician, was called, and in an- 
swer to various questions replied that he did not be- 
lieve that the Swett-street Hospital was in a desirable 
location, and he was not consulted in regard to it. 
The popular imiiression, he thought, greatly exag- 
gerated the danger of carrying patients through the 
.streets. In a close calculation he thought there were 
about 550 cases of smallpox in the city, excluding 
those in the hospital: there were about 100 in the 
hospitals. In the Highlands there were not more 
than 20 or 25 cases, and a great many cases of persons 
who would go to a hospital if there was a good one, 
would not now go. Every day he ^met with such 
persons, who woiild leave their own houses so as not 
to expose their families, if they conld have a room to 
themselves in a hospital. 

The Roxbury Almshouse could be fitted up in twen- 
ty-four or forty-eight hoitrs to be in condition for use. 
In reply to Alderman Clark, he said he had n&t been 
there for two years, and did uol know particularly 
about the drainage, heating, etc. He did not appre- 
hend much danger from smallpox, if the person was 



JANXTARY 13 



1878 



12 



kept, iBolatocl in a dwolliug lionsc. Knew nothing 
about the Swett-street lloi^pital, and liad tliought il 
was tinio cnougli to give an opinion when asked for 
feueli an opinion. He believed it to be better than 
untiling, but not to be comiiared with the almshousie 
for a hos|)ital; should liave selected that in prefer- 
vuvv to Swett street for a location. 

In answer to various questions, he said he did not 
know that the same effect was produced on the sew- 
ers by the tide tliere as at Beacon street. The Swott- 
street Hospital was objectionable on account of the 
large wards, and of having no rooms for nurses or 
for convalescents; but the princii)al ol)Jeetion was 
from the locality. There was danger that a building 
there would ))e washed off if not on piles, the tide 
often coining up to the road. It was the best hospi- 
tal the city has. and he could not compare it with 
others; hedid not believe there was danger in con- 
veying patients through tlie streets from the North 
End; the almshouse coiiUl lie lieated by stoves until 
other means could be provided. 

To Alderman (fibsini he replied that patients could 
not recover so well in a damp locality as on dry land; 
in some cases he thouglit patients were better off not 
to be removed at all; in many instances it was oh- 
jectionable to remove patients to (iallop's Island, on 
account of the condition of the weather, and of the 
stage of the disease; even with the liest facilities, of 
covered carriages, not taken out on being taken to 
the boat, removal might be objectionable, and not so 
well as to be con\eyed to a hospital without crossing 
the water. 

Alderman Stebbins in a few concluding remarks 
said he visited Swett-street llosjiital on Sunday, when 
the ice was Hoated up to the street, and he was told 
by a gentleman that it was common for the whole 
place to be covered by ice in winter, and there might 
be danger to a building by floating off if not put iij) 
cm stilts. He went also to the old almshouse, where il 
appeared there was some heating apparatus, which 
needs repair, but can be repaired in a short time. He 
visited a lady in the neighbin-hood, and without 
knowing her opinion, she volunteered it by saying 
that the people in the vicinity would not object to 
taking the almshonse. 

The people of East Boston were more exposed to 
smallpox by the constant passing of patients not only 
to the wharf adjoining the ferry, whence they are 
sent to the island, but also by patients crossing the 
ferry, than the people of Roxbury could be by lo- 
cating a hospital at the almshouse, and the Kox- 
bury people ought to be willing to yield something in 
staying the prevalence of the disease. 

In Pcirtland, where there were twenty cases, accom- 
modations had been provided in an isolated place for 
4.^0 patients. But what had been done here? Or 
rather what had not been done? A physician said 
within his hearing in the City Hall some days since, 
that for want of action 500 lives had been lost, aiul 
500 more would be lost because effective action was 
not taken to check the disease. In a matter of duly 
of this kind he did not wish to be responsible for the 
loss (if , one life, and he would rather sacrifice prop- 
erty than lives. As a lower consideration, he men- 
tioned that many people were kept away from the 
city and business was likely to suffer on accunt of the 
neglect, and for the credit of the city he hoped there 
would be no further delay. 

Alderman Gibson said it was simply a difference of 
opinion as to location which was in dispute, while 
they all wished to do all they could to arrest the dis- 
ease. His experience in relation to sewerage was 
that men living in the vicinity of the outlet of sewers 
were not subject anj' more to disease than elsewhere. 
The Swett-street locality he believed to be as good a 
place as was that of the residences of one-lialf the 
people in the city, while the ditficulty was. as he sup- 
posed, the hospital was not elegant enough, with spa- 
cious accommodations to please every one. 

Alderman Clark said he did not suppose his order 
would induce so wide a range of discussion. The 
facts were that more accommodations were needed. 
They had one building, and it would be better to have 
the increased accommodations there. So far as re- 
lated to the ground, it was much the same as that on 
which a large class of the people lived. He had the 
assurance of physicians that this was a most excellent 
location, the best which could be had, and what had 
been said only showed that physicians differed, as 
they did in relation to free vaccination. He hoped, 
therefore, that this order would be passed, even 
should the almshouse be used in the fiitnre. 

Alderman (Jafiield objected to using new buildings 
put uj) in a few days, when a building could be had 
which could be put in order in a short time. He felt 
assured that the people demanded the taking of the 
almshouse, and they had it reconmiended by the May- 
or, with that of conipetent physicians. Those recom- 



mendations had been almost unanimously concurred 
in by the Common Council, and he would move as an 
amendment to substitute for the order under consid- 
eration that which was passed by the Council, to take 
the Koxbury Almshouse for a hospital. 

Alderman CUark declared that the question under 
consideration had nothing to do with the Roxbury 
Almshouse; it was a question merely of improving 
the facilities on the Swett-street locality, in providing 
additional and better accommodations there. 

Alderman Power said he would renew his motion 
for the pri^vious question. 

Alderman Clark asked for the yeas and nays on the 
question. 

The Chair stated the question to be on the motion 
of Alderman Gatfield to substitute the order of the 
Common Council for that under consideration. 

Alderman Power raised the question that his mo- 
tion \\as upon the passage of the order of this Board, 
and desiring to speak in explanation, the Chair stated 
that no remarks would be in order, yet he would not 
press the rule If the Board were willing to allow re- 
marks or explanations. 

The Chair read a remonstrance from Frederick 
(luild and others, and Alderman Power presented re- 
monstrances from the Notre Dame Academy, S. C; 
f'obb and others, R. Worthington and 44 others. 
Michael Kellion and 25 others, James W. Kellion and 
MT f)thers, Jacob Jacobs and 37 others, W. H. French 
and 17 others, E. C. Bemis and 12 others. 

Alderman Cutter moved to lay the order on the tk 
ble for the purpose of taking up the nominations for 
members of the Board of Health. 

The motion was carried. 

Alderman Emery moved that the nominations be 
acted upon separately, which was carried. 

Alderman Hulbert offered an ordinance to repeal, 
the amendment of the ordinance passed at the last 
meeting of the Board, in striking out so much of the 
original ordinance as requires the Board to devote 
their whole time to the service. 

Alderman Hulbert advocated the restoration of th« 
ordinance to its original condition, as essential to the 
effective carrying out of the desion of the board, be- 
lieving that the members should devote their time 
mainly to the duties of the office. The remarks of 
Alderman Clark on the passage of the ordinance were 
read, to show the design in its passage. 

Alderman Clark said he had changed his opinion 
in relation to the matter, because of the difficulty in 
obtaining the services of competent men. 

The proposed ordinance was rejectee!. 

The question being upon the confirmation of the 
several nominees — 

Aldermen Gaffield and Clark expressed as their ex- 
pectations in the confirmation of the nominees, that 
they will make the duties of this office paramount to 
all others, the last-named saying that as honorable 
men they will devote themselves to the interests of 
the city. 

Alderman Hulbert said he brouglit the subject up 
because of the necessity of making the performance 
of the duties of the office effective, and he wished the 
members of the board to de\ote their time to it as the 
City Clerk does to his, and not to practise their pro- 
fessions, as he had heard it suggested some of the 
members would. 

The nominations of A. W. Boardman and S. H. 
Durgin were unanimously confirmed, and that of 
Albert T. Whiting was confirmed by a vote of 11 yeas 
to 1 nay — Alderman Hulbert. 

Alderman Cutter moved that all subjects relating to 
health be referred to the Board of Health. 

Alderman Gaffleld objected to the motion, as a 
shrinking from responsibility after the subject had 
been considered by the Board of AldeiTnen without 
definite action. 

The Chair stated that there was as yet no Board of 
Health, the Common Council having concurrence 
with this Board in acting upon the nominations. 

Aldennan Stebbins moved to take from the table 
the order to provide additional accommodations for 
smallpox patients. 

Th(! motion was carried. 

The Chair stated the question to be on the motion 
' of Alderman (raffield, to adopt the order to take the 
almshouse, as a substitute for the order of Alderman 
Clark. 

The question was taken, and the substitute was 
lost, by a vote of 5 to 7, as follows : 

Yeas — Bigelow, Emery, Gaffleld, Q,irincy, Stebbins. 

Nays — Brown, Clark, Cutter, Gibson, Hulbert, Pow- 
er, Sayward. 

The question recurring upon the passage of the 
original order — 

Alderman Stebbins moved to amend by adding au- 
thority to tlie committee to "purchase or hire suita- 
ble buildings in any other part of the city."' 



13 



BOARD OF Al^DERMEN. 



Alderman Emery said lie was in favor of this 
amendment, for it might be necessary to procure 
some other buildings in other localities, in an emer- 
gency. 

Alderman Hulbert regarded the amendment as most 
sensible, for with the increase of the accommoda- 
tions at Swett street, jjrovision might also be 
made elsewhere. It would be any easy way out of the 
difficulties, and relieve the Highlands' from the 
anxieties in regard to location of more hospitals hi 
that section. 

Alderman Brown also advocated the amendment, 
when it was accepted as a portion of the order, and 
the order, as amended, was passed by an unanimous 
vote. 

ORDEKS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman Clark, 

Ordered, That tlie Inspector of Buildings be re- 
quested to report to the City Council, as early as 
' practicable, whether sufticieni. precautious against 
lire are taken in the preparation and arrangment of 
scenery and other theatrical effects used at the sev- 
eral theatres in this city, and what legislation, if any, 
is necessary tor the public safety. 

Alderman Clark stated tluit he"oflered the order in 
■.consequence of the fact that last week the scenery in 

• one of the theatres in this city took tire, and it might 
have pr()\ed \ ery serious had it not promptly Iteen 
extinguished. In Europe he had been assured that 
a prepai'ation was used by whicli the scenery could 
not take fire, and this precaution was \viu-l by of con- 
sideration. 

Ordered, That the Joint Special Committee on 
Smallpox Hospital be requested to confer with the 
Chief of Police with a view to procure accommoda- 
tions at the north part of the city for smallpox pa- 
.tients. 

On motion of Alderman Sayward — 

Whereas, It appears to this Board that the follow- 
ing persons, viz., John Cronin, (i Webster place: 
, John Nichols, 10 Emmet place: Henry O. Kelly, ti 

• Chilson place; Dennis McCarty, 22 Lowell street; 
Cornelius Lang, 21 Nashua street; Mary Reardou, 55 
Oswego street; Charles Mulden, l;iO Silver street; 
Major Jones, 1 (irover place; Sarah White, 2.51 Gold 
Street, are affectad with smallpox, and are occupants 
of tenement or boarding houses, and should be im- 
mediately removed ;tlierefrom, it is tlu'rcfore hereby 

Ordered, That the City Physician, with the aid of 
such police force as may in any case be necessary, 
cause eacli of the above persons to be removed as 
soon as possible to one of the smallpox hospitals 
' heretofore established by this Board. 
. On motion of Alderman Sayward — 

Whereas, under an order of the City Council, 
passed the llth of October, 1872, a joint special com- 
mittee of the City Council was authorized to erect a 
biiildintr suitable for the purposes of a smallpox 
hospital, on land owned by the city on Swett street. 
Ward 13; and whereas, the said committee did on the 
■ 30th day of December, 1872, enter into a contract on 

■ behalf of the city with William Smith & Co. for tin- 
erection of a building, and did agree to pay said 
Smith & Co. the sum of $9000 upon the completion of 

, said building, in accordance with the plans and spe- 
cifications, in ten days from the date of the contract, 
and also the siun of $200 for each and every day that 
the building is completed before the time specified in 
the contract; and whereas, said Smith & Co. did 
complete said building in six days from the date of 
said contract as certified by the ardiitects; and 
whereas, the said contract after being properly exe- 
cuted was mislaid or destroyed so tliat the amount 
due the contractors cannot be paid ^vithout further 
action on the part of the City Council: it is therefore 
Ordered, That there be allowed and paid to William 
Smith & Company the sum of $10,300, in full com- 
pensation for work done and materials furnished by 
them in the erection of the smallpox hospital on 

■ Swett street; said sum to be charged tojthe appropria- 
tion for a Smallpox Hospital. 

On motion of Alderman Emery — 

Ordered, That the physicians having in charge the 
subject of vaccination be authorized to continue and 
complete the vaccination of persons in the several 
districts, agreeable to the instructions given them b / 
the former Board, or until otherwise directed. 

Alderman Stebbins offered the following order: 

Ordered, That the City Physician be requested to 
provide suitable warning cards on which shall be 
printed in plain letters upon both sides, "Smallpox"; 
such cards shall he placed upon the hell handle, door 
handle, or upon the door of every house where a 
case of smallpox or varioloid may exist. In case the 
owner or occupant of such houses object to placing 
" such cards as aforesaid, or shall remove the same, 
"the City Physician shall forthwith declare every sucli 
house a hospital, and establish a guard over such 
house to warn and prevent the public from entering 
the same. He shall also present to this Board, for 



their action, the names of all such persons as shall 
refuse to allow such warning cards to be applied to 
their doors. The expense attending the carrying out 
of this order shall be charged to the appropriation for 
Health. 

Alderman Clark believed that it would be better to 
carry out the original idea of the Board, in placing a 
red flag upon buildings, which would be much more 
effective as a warning. 

Alderman Stebbins said he had had some conversa- 
tion with the City Physician on the subject, and he 
was himself of the belief that the placing of a card 
upon a door would not only he less objectionable to 
the inmates of a bouse, but would be iuore likely to 
remain, and prove as effective as a warning to those 
who visited such places. 

Alderman Saj^vard preferred the display of a flag 
for in many cases there would be no door bell to 
which to affix a card. 

The order was amended to give discretionary 
power to make use of a card or a flag, and as amend- 
ed was passed. 

Aleerman Stebbins offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Health, under 
the direction of the Committee on Health, be direct- 
ed to provide at once a convenient and suitable room, 
in some central locality, for the temporary reception 
of persons suffering from the smallpox. The room 
so provided shall be open day and night, and a suita- 
ble person shall be in constant attendance to render 
such assistance as may be necessary. The expense 
attending the execution of this order shall he charged 
to the appropriation for Health. 

Alderman Sayward objected to the order as in- 
curring an unnecessary expense and calculated to 
draw more smallpox patients to the City Hall, where 
t liey are now too often seen. 

Alderman Stebbins replied that it did not necessa- 
rily follow that tlie room should be in the City Hall, 
and its location would soon become known to physi- 
cians and others. 

The order was passed. 

Alderman Stebbins also offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Health be 
directed to thoroughly fumigate, once a week, or 
oftener if deemed necessary, all the public school- 
houses in the city, the Court House and the City Hall; 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for Health. 

As at first proposed, under the direction of the Su- 
perintendent of Public Buildings, objection was made 
to the order by Alderman Sayward, who said the mat- 
ter properly liehmged to the Board of Health and not 
to the Superintendent of Public Buildings; when the 
order was amended and passed. 

On motion of Alderman Clark, an order was passed 
for an apportionment of betterments for Shawmut- 
a\ enue assessments upon N. B. Doggett and others. 

On motion of Alderman Sayward, an order was 
passed for the abatement of a nuisance at the corner 
of Portland and Travers streets. 

Alderman Stebbins offered an order requesting the 
Mayor to call a meeting of the Common Councn, for 
the purpose of acting upon the subject of a small- 
pox hospital, and of the nominations for a Board of 
Health. Objections being made by several Aldermen 
that the order was umiecessary, as interfering with 
the duties of the Mayor, whose interest in the sub- 
ject \vould prompt hini to take all measures necessary 
on the subject, the order was withdrawn. 

ORDERS OP NOTICE. 

On petition of McCh'cady & Stearns, for leave to 
erect and use a steam engine and boiler at 89 Court 
street. Hearing Monday, Feb. 3, 4 P. M. 

On petition of Dennison & Co., for leave to locate 
and use a steam engine and boiler at No. 15 Suffolk 
place, for heating purposes. Hearing Monday, Feb. 
3, 4 P. M. 

On petition of Williams & Everett, for leave to lo- 
cate a steam engine and boiler at the corner of Bed- 
ford and Washington streets. Hearing Monday, Feb. 
3, 4 P. M. 

On petition of R. B. Lincoln & Son, for leave to 
erect and use a steam engine and boiler on Alger 
street, near Dorchester street. Hearing Monday, 
Feb. 3, 4 P. M. 

On petition of Carew & Walsh, for leave to erect a 
steam engine and boiler on wharf on East Dover 
street. Hearing Monday, Feb. 3, 4 P. M. 

ORDERS READ ONCE. 

On motion of Alderman Clai-k, orders to pay the 
Merchants" Exchange Company $15,540 for land taken 
to widen Lindall street; to pay heirs of Charles 
Stimpson $1275 for land taken to widen Cottage 
street; to pay J. F. Wilson $77()0 for land taken to 
widen Summer street; to pay Catharine J. Cadogan 
$42 for land taken in the name of Henry A. Thomas 
for the widening of Warren street. 

Adjourned. 



14r 



COMMON COtJlSrClL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUAKY 14, 1873. 



A special meeting of the Common Council was held 
this evening at ly, o'clock, Edward O. Shopard, the 
President, in the chair. 

On motion of Mr. Thacher of Ward 15, the roll was 
called, when the following-named persons answered 
to theii' names. 

Barnes, Bicknell, Blackmar, Bleiler, Bowles, Bur- 
ditt, Burt, Caton, Collins, Cudworth, Dacey, Darrow, 
Dean. Denny, J. H. Doherty, Edwards, Flatley, Hall. 
Harrington. "Hine, Holmes, Hughes, Jones, Lamb, Ma- 
han,Marston, Martin, McCue, McKenney, Morse, Page, 
Pease, Perkins, Pickering, Powers, Prescott, Shaw, 
Shepard, Thacher, Train, Upham, Warren, Wells, 
West, Whiston, Wilbur, Woods, Woodward. 

The following communication from the Mayor was 
read: 

Executive Department, City Halt,, / 
Boston, Jan. 14, 1873. f 

To the Honorable the Common Council of the C'ity 
of Boston— Under the authority vested in me by the 
forty-sixth section of the city charter, I have sum- 
moned this meeting of the Common Council to take 
action upon the appointment of members of the Board 
of Health and npcm other matters from the Board of 
Aldermen relating to the preservation of the public 
health. Henry L. Pierce. Mayor. 

Ordered to be placed on file. 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

The nominations of members of the Board of 
Health, as follows, were taken up, the question beuig 
upon their confirmation, in concurrence with the 
Board of Aldermen : 

Alonzo W. Boardman, to hold otRce until the first 
Monday in May, 187B. 

Samuel H. Durgin, to hold office until the first Mon- 
day in May, 1875. 

Albert T. Whiting, to hold office until the first 
Monday in May, 1874. 

On motion of Mr. Thacher of Ward 15, the ques- 
tion was taken on each separately, and the nomina- 
tions were tinanimously confirmed. 

SMALLPOX HOSPITAL. 

The order from the Board of Aldermen authorizing 
the erection of additional hospital buildings on the 
lands of the city on Swett street, to purchase and 
remove buildings already erected, and to furnish said 
buildings; also for the purchase or hire of suitable 
buildings in any other part of the city, was taken up 
for consideration. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 6 stated that the order of the 
Board of Alderman was passed before the appoint- 
ments of the members of the new Board of Health 
were confirmed, and as it gives the committee power 
for temporary pu^joses only, it should be voted down 
and a new order take its place, and he moved its 
indefinite postponement. 

Mr. Thacher asked for the j'eas and nays on the 
question. 

Mr. Blackmar of Ward 11 agreed with the gentle- 
man from Ward 6 that a new order should be passed. 

Mr. Wells of Ward 3 inquired who has power to 
recommend measures under the new oaganization of 
the Board of Health — whether it was the Board or the 
City Council. 

Mr. Dean of Ward 12 said he supposed the motion 
to indefinitely postpone left the whole question open 
for argument, and it was nothing improper, on the 
part of any member of the Board who has any order 
or preferable proposition, to make known such alterna- 
tive proposition. If there was any such proposition, 
he wished to be infonned before taking any action, 
so that he should get all the information on the ques- 
tion desirable. 

Mr. Plynn of Ward 7 said he intended, at the proper 
time, to bifer a new order, which he read, as follows: 

Ordered, That a smallpox hospital be established 
in the building known as the Old Almshouse in Rox- 
bury. and that the Joint Standing Committee on the 
Health Dcijartment be directed to make the necessa- 
ry repairs on said building without delay, and provide 
such furniture, fixtures or supplies as the Board of 
Health may require for the maintenance of said hos- 
pital: the expense to be charged to the appropriation 
for a Smallpox Hospital. 

Mr. Flynn stated in explanation that this was of- 
fered inasmuch as the power of the committee under 



which the first hospital was built, ceases from and 
after tonight. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 hoped the motion would pre- 
vail, for after the exhibition in the Board of Alder- 
men yesterday, — and he did not mean to say any-- 
thing indecorous — after the statements made by the 
City Physician and the Superintendent of the Small- 
pox Hospital, that the place was wholly unfit for a 
hospital, the order should not be passed. The state- 
ment had been sent over the wires and through the 
countiy — of kuch unfitness, and it was humiliating to 
be found in such a predicament. 

A year ago application was made to the General 
Court for additional authority for the suppression of 
the smallpox: there were then but a few cases in this 
city, and legislation was granted. Since that time 
not a week, day nor hour but the disease had been on 
the increase, and our citizens were dying by the thou- 
sand, yet nothing ettectual had been done, and the 
City Goverument in one branch had allowed the peo- 
ple to die without preventing the spread of the dis- 
ease. One person in four or in three died from it, 
and this was in the nineteenth century and in the city 
of Boston. 

The question of opening the Public Library on 
Sunday had been debated as affecting the public 
morals, but in a case involving the lives of the peo- 
ple the two branches differed as to where they should 
place the sick. Competent physicians state that the 
place where the present hospital is located is an im- 
proper one, yet it is proposed to build another one 
there. Noxious vapors rise there which would make 
a well man sick, and while there were places enough 
for a hospital he would vote for an indefinite post- 
ponement of the order. Something had been said 
about taking private property for a hospital, and he 
believed that under the law, if necessary, the Tre- 
niont House might be taken for a hospital. 

Mr. Walls of Ward 3 inquired whether the gentle- 
man had ever visited the location of the Swett-street 
liospital, and where he got his information in relation 
to it. 

Mr. Shaw said he was familiar with the locality, but 
had not been there since the building was put up. 

Mr. Wells said he knew the location, and was sat- 
isfied that those who spoke against it knew noth- 
ing of it. For construction, warmth, comfort, 
beds and bedding, and everything desirable, it was all 
that could be wished. Matched boards, two thickness- 
es of tarred paper between the floors and on the inner 
and outside of the boarding, with tarred and grav- 
elled roof, and good heating arrangements, with hot 
and cold water and everything for comfort. 

Prom what he had seen, a better place could not 
have been selected for a hospital. As to stench, it 
was all wrong, for stench could not be expected to 
come from water where the ice was eighteen inches 
thick. The cesspool was eight inches below the 
floor, and the draining was perfect. The building 
was so constructed that wings could be added, so 
that it might form a hollow square, and be made am- 
ple for all cases. If the physicians would go among 
the poor and represent the building properly it would 
be filled today. 

Objecticm had been made that the hospital was 
built in five days; so. too, objection was made against 
the Gallop's Island hospital, of which he knew some- 
thing.but the man who was afraid to go down there and 
work was the loudest brawler about the City Hall 
against the Swett-street Hospital. If overloaded, he did 
not doubt they could add to the building and provide 
plenty of room for all who needed it. It was easy of 
access, and if any physician after a fair examination 
would say it was not a fit place, he would go, and 
\^•here they might say. 

Mr. Perkins 'atad he did not think it was worth 
while to give in charge the building of a hospital to 
a committee at the first meeting of the Council, when 
the Board of Health was about to be organized. This 
committee was now dead, or will be in twentj'-four 
hours, and they should not load a committee with 
powers which could not belong to them. 

Mr. Mahan of Ward 5 stated some of the duties of 
the Committee on Health under the new ordinance, 
and he favored the indefinite postponement, that they 
might have an opportunity to vote for the order as 
provided for through a committee under this ordi- 
nance. 

Mr. Dean of Ward 12 read the provisions of the 
ordinance relating to the duties of the Board of 
Health. Under the statute and the ordinance, he sup- 
posed that the Board of Health, with two justices 
of the peace, if agreed, might require the sher- 
iff to take possession of any building, impress 
any p.ersons and take such supplies as might 
be' necessary in the care of a hospital for small- 
pox patients. Such ppp'pfs the new Board of Health 
has, and if so they may take tjie aljnshogse pr apy 



JAKlJAilY 14r, 1873 



15 



other building they may believe necessary for their 
purposes. W hat can or what can they not do y The 
statute gives them the largest possible powers for the 
discharge of their duties. 

Why "may not the Sheriff take possession of any 
property necessary for the safety of the people? This 
he said without being an advocate of the Board of 
Health. There had been a great many articles writ- 
ten in the papers, and much clamor, but the reasons 
for it were not in accordance with his judgment. The 
discussion and action had been of a character to take 
away the responsibility of an efficient Board of Health. 
Once the Common Council had concurrent action in 
health powers, but this was lost in a revision of the 
city charter, and the two branches could act with 
greater vigor than they could separately. 

The articles and the discussion had not been in ac- 
cordance with his judgment. It was not wise, for 
the reason given by President Lincoln, that you should 
not swap horses while crossing a stream. The dis- 
cussion had paralyzed the Board of Aldermen as a 
Board of Health, and as the two branches differed in 
their action the disease spread. We had now got a 
new board and this board has supreme power, and 
may take houses, stores, attendants, nurses even, for 
the general safety. If they act right, it is well 
enough, as we are. but if they have not power enough 
they may apply for more. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward f> said it was doubtful how far 
the powers of the committee could go. The Board 
of Aldermen had taken a certain stand, and the pub- 
lic had taken a different one, and it was desirable to 
throw the influence of the Council in favor of taking 
the almshouse. In that case the Board of Health 
will be more likely to take it if backed itp. 

Mr. Blackmar of Ward 11 said he a^eed that the 
Board of Health had unqualified power in this emer- 
gency, yet he agreed with the gentleman from Ward (i 
in his views in relation to the position of the ques- 
tion. The various votes of the two boards were cited 
by him, and it appeared that the arguments of the 
Board of Aldermen resolved themselves into three 
propositions: that the Swett-street Hospital was 
erected in six days, and another could be built in 
that time; that the taking of the almshouse would 
greatly depreciate the value of property in the neigh- 
borhood; and that the people tnere were opposed to 
taking it. 

If the hospital could be built in six days, it could 
never be available for hospital uses; the location is a 
swampy place, the tides sweep overjit, and some morn- 
ing the hospital may be found outside of Boston 
Light. The present building was built of green tim- 
berj the sap comes out at the head of the beds of 
patients, and it was a disgrace to the city. As there 
were no good reasons against the use of the alms- 
house, its opponents must suggest something. The 
location at Swett street exposes fifty people where 
one would be at the almshouse, and it was but 1800 
feet from the St. James Hotel. 

It was some argument in favor of the almshouse 
that the Mayor had recommended it, not carelessly 
but conscientiously, on due consideration, backed up 
by some of the best men in the city, whose opinions 
were in writing. The Council had twice by its vote 
fixed upon that location, and it was due to its digni- 
ty that it should adhere to that choice, and the new- 
order comes up as an excuse for further delay. They 
were then right and ought to adhere, that the people 
may respect their motives and that they may com- 
mand respect as a branch of the City Covernment. 
The hospital at Swett street was hardly fit for a barn 
in which to put a horse, and should not be a place 
for a citizen because he has the smallpox. It was 
not the way in which they treated prisoners. t was 
a wet, unhealthy, miserable place, and it was a 
shame and a crime, and they were guilty if they sup- 
ported such action. 

Mr. Wells denied that there was any sap oozing 
from the boards, which were all kiln dried. That the 
land was marshy in the neighborhood and the tide 
flowed over it, he would admit, but where the tide 
ebbs and flows, it must keep the locality clean and 
purify it, as was contended by certain individuals who 
wished to secure the tidal basin on the Back Bay for 
an ebb and flow of water. The ebb and flow of water 
must increase health Instead of injuring it. As to 
the charge of marsh and bad air, there was a height 
of two feet in piling, with a space underneath the 
building. 

Mr. Thacher of Ward 15 said with reference to a 
statement that there had been a pest house on the 
almshouse lot, that it was not so, but ther? was for- 
merly a hospital there for ship fever. Ifl relation to 
the Swett-street Hospital, and o.^ its tiefflg VqQ CQW 
for horses, the thermonne^ei' ]\9A stood ivt 70 there 
^vith the YeiltilfttOTs open, while 62 was considered to 
^g "bigli enough. Before the wharf was purchased by 



the city it was used as a lumber wharf, and he never 
heard of lumber being washed away. 

Mr. Plynn said he failed to see, in what had been 
said, any argument why the order should not be in- 
definitely postponed. The gentleman from Ward 3 
had built two smallpox hospitals, and was desirous of 
building two more. 

Mr. Wells said his statements were true in regard 
to ithe Swett-street Hospital, and if he should have 
the smallpox he should desire to be taken there. 

The Chair stated in answer to an inquiry, that the 
hospital would remain in the charge of the joint 
special committee until the new Board of Health was 
organized. 

Mr. Dean said it would he but a temporary life for 
a committee, and not long enough for them to erect 
any additional buildings. That might furnish a rea- 
son why the order should be indefinitely postponed. 
No member of the Council could wish to enter into 
any contest in such a matter with the Board of Alder- 
men, for they were all desirous to do what they could 
to prevent the spread of disease. If the committee 
goes out of service so soon it w'as not worth while to 
give it new power. 

" Mr. Perkins stated that the Alderman who offered 
the order expected the committee having in charge 
the hospital would go out and be superseded. 

The motion to indefinitely postpone was carried, 
and the order of Mr. Plynn was offered. 

The Chair announced the appointment of the Com- 
mittee on Health under an order of the Board of Al- 
dermen, and in concurrence joined to the committee 
on the part of the Council, Messrs. Denny of Ward 9. 
Pickering of Ward 6, and Flynn of Ward 7. 

Mr. De~an said further that the Board of Health had 
the power to take such buildings and other measures 
as may be necessary to prevent the spread of small- 
pox, and he suppesed they mean to do it. If so, why 
should any special provision be made or order passed 
by the City Council. Such a course would be unnec- 
essary and unwise. Why not leave the new organ- 
ization untrammelled"? Then if they wished for any 
additional powers to enal)le them to carry out the 
duties of their office with efficiency, it would be time 
enough to pass such an order. He would offer the 
following: 

Resolved, That the Board of Health is hereby re- 
quested to make application to the City Council for 
any powers or facilities, if any, which they may find 
necessary and convenient to enable them to discharge 
their duties with efficiency. 

Mr. Plynn moved to lay his order on the table, 
which was carried. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 opposed the new proposition 
as only tending to delay, and before proceeding the 
new Board of Health would be obliged to come to 
the City Council for more authority. It was due to 
the character of the Council that having twice passed 
an order for taking the almshouse, it was but right 
that they should stand up here and assert the right- 
fulness of their action. It was due also to the peo- 
ple who sent them here that they should show that 
they did nothing to cause delay and the spread of the 
disease. 

Mr. Plynn said his object in laying the order offered 
by him on the table, was for the purpose of allow- 
ing the new Board of Health an opportunity to take 
the responsibility of using the almshouse. If they 
did not take that responsibility by Thursday night, he 
would take up the order and pass it. 

Mr. West of Ward 16 suggested, as an answer to a 
question about delay, that should the order of the 
gentleman from Ward 7 be passed, it would not be 
concurred in by the Board of Aldermen, and delay- 
would be the consequence. 

Mr. Denny of Ward 9 believed it to be desirable 
that the course of the Council should be right from 
the start, and while he was satisfied with the course 
pursued by the C^ouncil hitherto, as being the right 
one, as the Board of Health had full powers, he would 
not lift one feather from their shoulders. The propo- 
sition of the gentleman from Ward 12 seemed a prop- 
er one, and it could be passed, leaving the responsi- 
bility where it belongs. 

The resolution w-as passed. 

The order to provide a convenient and suitable 
room in a central locality for the temporary reception 
of smallpox patients, to be open night and day, with 
suitable attendance thereon, was considered. 

Mv. Perkins asked. Why not dispose of this as they 
did the other, the Board of Health having full powers 
to pravide a room? 

Tlae order was passed by a vote of 37 to 5. 

The order upon procuring accommodations at the 
north part of the city for smallpox patients came up 
for concurrence. 

Mr. West of Ward 16 objected to its passage as be- 
ing no sense in it, after their action on the other order. 



16 



COMMON COXTNCIL. 



Mr. Wells moved its reference to the Committee on 
Health. 

Mr. Flynn s^aid the committee would die in twenty- 
four hours, and moved the indefinite postponement 
of the order. 

Mr. Pease of Ward 1 moved to lay the order on the 
table, which was carried. 

The order for the fumigation of schoolhouses and 
other public buildings came up for concurrence. 

Mr. Wells moved that it be laid on the table, which 
was lost, when the order was rejected. 

The order providing, under a misplaced contract. 



to pay William Smith & Company the sum of $10,300, 
for work done and materials furnished in the erection 
of the smallpox hospital on Swett street, being under 
consideration — 

Mr. Anderson of Ward 3 moved a suspension of 
the rules for its passage. 

Mr. Holmes opposed a suspension of the rules gen- 
erally, and particularly in this case. 

The motion to suspend the rules failed, by a vote 
of 25 to 16— not tvvo-thirds. 

Adjourned. 



17 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Oommon Council, 

JANUARY 16, 1873. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common Coun- 
cil was held this evening, at 1)4 o'clock, E. O. Shep- 
ard, the President, in the chair. 

On motion of Mr. Brackett of Ward 10, the roll was 
called, when fifty-six members appeared to be pres- 
ent, as follows: 

Abbott, Adams, Anderson, Barnes, Bicknell, Black- 
mar, Boardman, Bowles, Brackett, Brennan, Burditt, 
Burt, Caton, Collins, Cudworth, Dacey, Darrow, Dean, 
Edwards, Flatley, Flynn, Hall, Harrington, Hine, 
Holmes, Hughes, Jones, Kingsley, Lamb, Madden, 
Mahan, Marston, Martin, McCiie, Morse, Page, 
Pease, Perkins, Pickering, Powers, Prescott, Risteen, 
Shaw, Shepard, Thacher, Tower, Train, Vpham, War- 
ren, Wells, West, Weston. Whiston, Wilbur, Woods, 
Woodward. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The annual reports of the Superintendents of 
Bridges, and the quarterly reports of the Port Physi- 
cian and the Paymaster of State Aid were severally 
ordered to be placed on file. 

The amendment to the order concerning the printing 
of the Municipal Register, viz., that "also a pocket 
edition of the Rules, Orders and Committees of the 
City Government" be printed, was concurred in. 

The order requesting the Inspector of Buildings to 
report whether there is sufficient precaution used 
against fire in theatres, and what legislation may be 
necessary, was passed, in concurrence. 

The orders appointing the joint standing commit- 
tees were passed, in concurrence, and the members of 
the several committees on the part of the Board of 
Aldermen were read. 

The President announced the joint standing com- 
mittees on the part of the Council, and the standing 
committees of the Common Council, as follows: 

JOINT STANDING COMIHTTEES. 

Armories — Page of Ward 9, Whiston of Ward 8, 
Davis of Ward 14. 

Assessors' Department — Weston of Wai-d 1, Bick- 
nell of Ward 4. Cudworth of Ward 11, Harrington 
of Ward 8. Hall of Ward 10. 

Bathing— Whiston of Ward 8, Kingsley of Ward 3, 
Martin of Ward .5, Boardman of Ward 14, Warren of 
Ward 12. 

Claims— Blackmar of Ward 11, Wilbur of Ward 9, 
Thacher of Ward 15, Brackett of Ward 10, Train of 
Ward 1:3. 

Common and Squares — Perkins of Ward 0, Wilbur 
of Ward 9, Dacey of Ward 2, Jones of \^'ard 14, 
Risteen of Ward 10. 

East Boston Ferries — McKenney of Ward 1, Pick- 
ering of Ward 6, Collins of Ward 2, Hall of Ward 10, 
Cudworth of Ward 11 . 

Engineer's Department — Mahan of Ward 5, Adams 
of Ward 14, Kelley of Ward 15. 

Fire Department — Burt of Ward 16, Marston of 
Ward 10; Jones of Ward 14, Pease of Ward l„Hine 
of Ward 6. 

Fire Alarms — Collins of Ward 2, Davis of Ward 14, 
Upham of Ward IB. 

Fuel— Darrow of Ward 8, Lamb of Ward 7, Abbott 
of Ward 3. 

Harbor — Pease of Ward 1, Shaw of Ward 5, Dean of 
Ward 12. 

City Hospital— Wells of Ward 3, N. Doherty of 
Ward 2, Boardman of Ward 14. 

Institutions at South Boston and Deer Island — 
Prescott of Ward 9, Burditt of Ward 16, Thacher of 
Ward 15, Loring of Ward 12, Barnes of Ward 11. 

Mount Hope Cemetery— Kingsley of Ward 3, T. H. 
Doherty of Ward 2, McCue of Ward 5. 

Legislative Matters — Denny of Ward 9, Dean of 
Ward 12, Perkins of Ward 6. 

Ordinances — Dean of Ward 12, West of Ward 16, 
Dacey of Ward 2, Holmes of Ward 6, Mahan of Ward 5. 

Overseers of Poor— Burt of Ward 16, Lamb of 
Ward 7; Tower of Ward 1. 

Public Buildings — Bicknell of Ward 4, Caton of 
Ward 11, Weston of Ward 1; Bowles of Ward 12, 
Morse of Ward 13. 

Public Instruction — President of the Common 
Council (ex-ofticio); West of Ward 16, Holmes of 
Ward 6; Shaw of Ward 5, Power.s of Ward 4. 

Public Lands — Pickering of Ward 6, Darrow of 
Ward 8, Burt of Ward 16, Wells of Ward 3, Page of 
Ward 9. 



Printing — Anderson of Ward 3, Whiston of Ward 
8; Page of Ward 9. 

Public Library— Holmes of Ward 6, Blackmar of 
Ward 11, Woods of Ward 8, Tower of Ward 1, Mad- 
den of Ward 7. 

Salaries— Wilbur of Ward 9, Loring of Ward 12, 
Risteen of Ward 10. 

Streets — Flynn of Ward 7, Perkins of Ward 6, 
Burditt of Ward 16, Page of Ward 9, Woodward of 
Ward 13. 

Surveyor's Department — Jones of Ward 14, Bren- 
nan of Ward 13, Bleiler of Ward 15. 

Survey and Inspection of Buildings— Caton of 
Ward 11, Hughes of Ward 5, Marston of Ward 10. 

Treasury Department — Edwards of Ward 15, .N. 
Doherty of Ward 2, Flatley of Ward 4. 

Water— Pease of Ward 1, Wells of Ward 3, Ed- 
wards of Ward 15, Flatley of Ward 4, Adams of 
Ward 14. 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Police— Burt of Ward 16, Darrow of Ward 8, Mar- 
tin of Ward 7, Kingsley of Ward 3, McCue of Ward 5. 

Paving— Warren of Ward 12, Prescott of Ward 9, 
Anderson of Ward 3, Hughes of Ward 5, Kelley of 
Ward 1.5. 

The petitions of the Boston Cooperative Associa- 
tion, the Massachusetts Homoeopathic Medical Soci- 
ety, F. H. llnderwood and others. Company F, First 
Infantry, James Mulliu, D. Lothi-op <fe Co., Great 
Western Despatch Company, and of Hollihan & 
Maguire, were severally referred, in concurrence. 

The petition of John Nugent for employment in 
the Smallpox Hospital being on reference to the 
Committee on Health, in concurrence, Mr, Blackmar 
of Ward 11, objected to the reference as inappropri- 
ate, at the present time after the organization of the 
Board of Health, when a motion to refer to the Board 
of Health was lost, and the reference to the Commit- 
tee on Health was nonconcurred in. 

The following communication was laid before the 
Council : 

Health Department, City Hall, | 
Boston, Jan. 15, 1813. f 

7b the City Council of the City of Boston:. Gentle- 
men — Notice is hereby given to the City Council that 
the Board of Health has organized by the choice of 
A. W. Boardman as chairman and Chiiies E. Davis, 
Jr.. as Clerk. 

Charles E. Davis, Jr., 

Clerk. 

Ordered to be sent up. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The order for the printing of the rules and orders 
of the City Government was laid on the table, on mo- 
tion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 7, as unnecessary, after 
the concurrence in an order of the Board of " Alder- 
men. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Benjamin Clapp, for leave to purchase land. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Public Lands. 

E. MacLean, for leave to erect a building larger than 
the law allows. Referred to the Committee on Sur- 
vey and Inspection of Buildings. 

Boston Bottle Works, for compensation for dam- 
ages sustained at the late fire by the blowing up of a 
building. Referred to Committee on Claims. 

William M. Flanders, John Small and others, rep- 
resenting that George A. Shaw is ineligible to a seat in 
the Common Council from Ward 5, as a non-resident 
of the ward, and asking for an investigation of the 
subject. Referred to the Committee oh Elections. 

William M. Flanders, John Small and others, claim- 
ing that John W. Mahan is ineligible to a seat in the 
Common Council from Ward 5, as a non-resident of 
the ward. Referred to the Committee on Elections. 

Mr. Darrow of Ward 8 aimounced that the Commit- 
tee on Finance, on the part of the Common Council, 
had made choice of William H. West of Ward 16 as 
chairman. 

Mr. Bicknell of Ward 4 annouced that the Commit- 
tee on Accounts of the Common Council had made 
choice of Henry W. Pickering of Ward 6 as their 
chairman. 

REPORT ON ELECTIONS IN WARD TWO. 

Mr. Bicknell of Ward 4, from the Committee on 
Elections of the Common Council, to whom was re- 
ferred the petition of Patrick Doherty and others, 
that the votes cast for members of the Common Coun- 
cil at the last municipal election in Ward 2 may be 
recounted, made a report that they have carefully re- 
cotmted the original ballots in the possession of the 
City Clerk, with the following result: 

Timotliy J. Dacov had 1069 

Neil Doliertv . . . .' 945 

Thomas H. Doherty 924 

Patrick Collins 880 

Jolin Campbell 4(>0 



JANUARY 16, 1873 



18 



W.J.Wclcli 406 

VViUiaiii Oi-itfiii 414 

H, K. Hiitcliiiison 340 

VVilluiiu CuiiiiiiiKham 293 

VVilUaiu Stiirvctt 244 

Patrick Norton 214 

,Jolin Kelloy 113 

Henry S. Harris GO 

Mathanlel Hamilton 35 

VV . McLaughlin 35 

■I.J. MaKUire 27 

Janit's Hatton 21 

Charles MeDcvitt 19 

M. P. Mahoney, Thomas W. Brown, Jr., two each; 
John Carom, William Young, George S. Noyes, John 
Frazier, Thomas Dinsmore, C. Hoyt, Josiah Harding, 
Robert Marsh, W. I. Smart, Abel Monroe, Fred. 
Pease, William McKenney, Joshua Weston, Moses B. 
Tower, one each. 

In presenting the report the committee desire to call 
attention to the fact that the practice has obtained of 
ordering a recount of the votes cast for members of 
this board simply upon the petition of a number of 
voters in any ward. Such proceedings are not in 
accordance with the provisions of the statute. It is 
necessary that some person who received votes should 
flrst serve upon the City Clerk, within sixty days 
after the election, a written notification claiming an 
election to the office, and declaring his intention to 
contest the right of some other person who received a 
certificate of election to occupy his seat at this board. 
Upon that notice the City Clerk is required to retain 
the ballots under seal until called for by this board 
or its committee. And the contestant must give 
notice to the Council, upon its reorganization, that 
he claims the seat occupied by a certain member of 
this board, and that he rests his claim upon the evi- 
dence furnished by the ballots in the possession of 
the City Clerk. 

In the present case the rights of the sitting mem- 
bers were not contested; and although it was expect- 
ed that gross errors would be shown in the returns of 
the ward officers, there was not the slightest probabil- 
ity that the result would be changed, and the petition 
appears to have been presented merely for the pur- 
pose of satisfying the curiosity of certain parties as 
to the correctness of the count made by the ward 
officers. 
The report was accepted. 

REPORT ON mayor's ADDRESS. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward (i, from the joint special 
committee appointed to report what disposition 
should bj made of the several topics embraced in the 
Mayor's Inaugural Address, made a report recom- 
mending the passage of the accompanying order: 

Ordered, That so much of the Mayor's address as 
relates to street improvements in the district recently 
covered by fire be referred to the Joint Standing 
Committee on Streets; that so much as relates to in- 
creasing the efficiency of the Fire Department be re- 
ferred to the Joint Standing Committee oh the Fire 
Department; that so much as relates to additional 
safeguards against loss of life by fire in buildings 
used for public houses and in tenement houses and 
manufactories be referred to the Joint Standing 
Committee on the Survey and Inspection of Build- 
ings, with instructions to report as early as 
practicable whether additional legislation is needed; 



that so much as relates to additional accommodations 
for tlie correctional, reformatory and pauper institu- 
tions be referred to the Joint Standing Committee on 
Public Institutions; that so much as relates to the es- 
tablisement of a State Hospital for the accommoda- 
tion of the insane paupers belonging in the city of 
Boston be referred to the Joint Standing Committee 
on Legislative Matters; that so much as relates to ad- 
ditional accommodations for the public schools be re- 
ferred to the Joint Standing Committee on Public In- 
struction ; that so much as relates to the occupation of 
the flats on the northerly shore of South Boston be re- 
ferred to the Joint Standing Committee on Streets; that 
so much as relates to additional legislation concerning 
drainage, grades and streets in and around Boston 
be referred to the Committee on Legislative Matters; 
that so much as relates to the taking of the territory 
lying between Tremont, Buggies, Parker and Pren- 
tiss streets, for the purpose of ^abating a nuisance ex- 
isting thereon, be referred to the Joint Special Com- 
mittee on the Suffolk-street District; that so much as 
relates to the appointment of a commission for the 
revision of the city charter be referred to the Com- 
mittee on Ordinances; that so much as relates to the 
registration of voters and the manner of conducting 
elections be referred to the Committee on Legislative 
Matters. 

Ordered, That so much of the Mayor's Address as 
relates to the public health be referred to the Board 
of Health. 

The report was accepted, and the orders were 
adopted. 

Mr. Jones of Ward 14 offered an order that the 
Street Commissioners be requested to consider the 
expediency of extending Lambert avenue to Dudley 
street. Referred to the Committee on Streets. 

COMMITTEES TO NOMINATE PUBLIC OFFIOBBS. 

On nomination of Trustees of City Hospital — Page 
of Ward 9, Boardman of Ward 14, Risteen of Ward 10. 

On nomination of City Solicitor — Harrington of 
Ward 8, Holmes of Ward ti, Blackmar of Ward 11. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Mr. Prescott of Ward 9— 

Ordered, That there be allowed and paid to Lucius 
W. Knight, in full compensation for extra services as 
assistant superintendent on the Suffolk-street District, 
during the year 1872, the sum of $300; said sum to be 
cliarged to the appropriation for Suffolk-street Dis- 
trict. 

Ordered, That there be allowed and paid to John 
L. Brigham, in full compensation for his services as 
bookkeeper on the Suffolk-street District, from May 
1, 1872, to Jan. 16, 1873, the sum of .$750; said sum to 
be charged to the appropriation for the Suffolk-street 
District. 

Mr. Burditt of Ward 16 offered an order that the 
Trustees of the Public Library be requested to have 
the Reading Room of the Public Library opened on 
Sunday, between the hours of 2 and 9 P. M. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Public Library. 

On motion of Mr. Harrington of Ward 8 — 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Public Build- 
ings, be instructed forthwith to cause the skylights of 
the City Hall to be opened and shut at will for the 
ventilation of the building. 

Adjourned, 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



19 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



rroccpdinss of tlio Boanl of Aldormen, 

JANUAKY '^»(), l!S7;-5. 



Tht' roynlar \veukt3' iiieoting of the Board of Alder- 
men was held this afternoon, at fonr o'clock, Alder- 
man C'ntter. the f'hairman. presiding. 

.lURORS DKAWN. 

sixty traverse jurors were drawn for the Su- 
preme" Judicial Court. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Constable— Harrison D. Littlefleld. 
Weigher of Coal — Joseph Thomas. 
The appointment by the City Clerk of Charles R. 
Alley as Assistant City Clerk was confirmed. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND EEPKUKED. 

W. T. Porter, for lea\e to occupy a wooden stable 
for one horse on Woodward avenue. 

(Teorge W. Dyer, for lea^e to occupy a wooden sta- 
ble for two horses on Pleasant street, corner of Savin- 
Hill avenue. 

Joseph Burnett, for leave to occupy a wooden sta- 
ble for two horses rear No. .5 Henchman street. 

A. A. Hall, for leave to occupy a wooden stable for 
eight horses on Castle street. 

C. O. Smith, for leave to erect stables in an old 
building on (iold street for six horses. 

Severally referred to the Committee 011 Health on 
part of this Board. 

Ebeiie/er E. Hill, to be compensated for loss .sus- 
tained by him on account of the use of his house, No. 
bfi Hudson street, as a smallpox hospital. Referred 
to the Joint Committee on Health. 

J. M. A: F. Jones, for removal of the burnt material 
from the south side of High street. 

Lang & Delano and others, that a portion of India 
wharf be called India row. 

Gilman Brothers and others, that tlie sidewalks in 
Milk street may be put in order for travel. 

J. H. Chadwick it Co. and others, that the side- 
walks in Milk street may be i)ut in order for travel. 

William Claflin i.\i Co. and others, tluit Pearl street 
may be cleared from rubbish and put in order. 

C. O. Smith, to be paid for grade damages on Fouith 
street. 

Eli Pernald, for leave to occupy a portion of Upton 
street with a small ))uildiiig temporarily. 

Seveially referred to the Committee on Paving, the 
last with full powers. 

Horace C. Rose, to be compensated for property 
taken fi'om him by the city, on Orange street. Re- 
ferred to Committee <m Suffolk-Street District. 

Thompson, Bigelow & Brown, to be paid for loss of 
property by action of agents of the city at the fire 
No\ember"9 and 10. 1873. 

J. A. & N. Harwood, to be paid for loss of property 
by agents of the city at the time of the recent fire. 

Sniith & McOarraglc, to be paid the balance on con- 
tract for erec^tion of the smallpox hospital wbich was 
destroyed by fire. 

Henderson Inches, to be paid for damage done to 
his building by action of the city at the recent fire 
on Washington street. 

J. E. Tilton & Co., to be compensated for damages 
caused by agents of the city to building IHl Wash- 
ington street at the recent fire. 

Ira B. Orcutt, to be paid for personal injuries sus- 
tained from a fall in School street. 

David H. Sampson, to be paid for injuries received 
while crossing the Common. 

Severally referred to Committee on Claims. 

William Adams, for appointment as an anctioneer. 
Referred to Committee on Cicen-ses. 

Zeplianiah [Bassett for abatement of Atlantic-ave- 
nue betterments. 

Joseph NickerSon, for apportionment of Harrison- 
avenue betterments. 

Severally referred to the C^ommittee on Streets. 

Georges Viles, lessee of stall under Faneuil Hail 
Market, to be paid for damag(!S occasioned by the 
leaking of a water closet into lus premises. Referred 
to Committee on Market. 

Assistant Port Physician, for increase of salary for 
extra services. Referred to Committee on Healtli. 

Mercantile Savings Institution, for remission of tax 
illegally assessed. Referred to Committee on Asses- 
sor's Department. 

Joseph L. Watson, for appointment as Superinten- 
dent of Dover-street Bridge. Referred to committee 
to nominate Superintendents of Bridges. 



J. W. Bartlett, that the city would adojjt his method 
of lighting the sireet lanijis. Keferred 10 Committee 
on Lamps^ 

Hartford Steam Boiler Company, that steam boilers 
in jinblic buildings be inspected, etc. Referred to 
Committee on Public Buildings. 

A communication was received from the Street 
ft'ommissioners transmitting an order for the taking 
of the estate of Michael H. Glecson, on Summer 
street, at the corner of High street, for the widening 
of Summer street, the expense of said widening be- 
ing adjudged at $14,500; with an order accepting the 
surrender of said estate, the said Gleeson objecting 
to being assessed for the widening of Summer street^ 
the amount of land so taken being 1)25 square feet. 
The order was referred to Committee on Streets. 

ADDITIONAI. APPROPRIATIONS FOR CHARLES-RIVER AND 
WARREN BRIDGES. 

A communication was received from J. M. Wight- 
man, Commissioner on Charles- River and Warren 
bridges, representing that in confonnity with the re- 
quirements of the Harbor Commissioners, the legal 
supervisors of the plans for a new draw on Warr(;n 
Bridge, a much larger sum has been obliged to be ex- 
pended upon the draw and the alterations of said 
t>ridge than was anticipated or estimated by the Com- 
missioners when the appropriation was made. 

The original appropriation has consequently been 
found to be inadequate to meet the expenditures and 
the current expenses of the financial year. 

The amount of the appropriation was $42,000. Of 
this there has been expended to January 1 : 

General Incidental expenses $3,506 11 

Repairs on draw of C'liarles-Kiver Bridge 1,458 Iti 

WioTcn l?rUlge S6,594 OS 

*41,558 35 
Balance to credit of .bridges 441 65 

An additional appropriation will therefore be re- 
quired of $10,000 to meet the outstanding bills now 
payable and those which will be payable during the 
present fiscal year of the city of Bostoi^. The un- 
dersigned respectfull)' requests that this amount may 
be appropriated by tlie City Council for the care and 
management of Charles-River and Warren bridges. 

Referred to the Committee (ni Finance. 

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF GRANITE BRIDGE. 

The annual report of the Superintendent of Oirauite 
Bridge gives 224 as the numbev of vessels which 
passed the draw of that bridge during the year 1872. 

Ordered to be sent down. 

ANNUAI, REPORT OF SEALERS OF WEIGHTS AND MEAS- 
URES. 

The annual report of the Sealers of Weights and 
Measures gives, as the expenditures in the Northern 
District, the sum of $3801— $2800 was for salaries of 
Sealer and assistant, and $420 for horse keeping, shoe- 
ing, etc. ; exiienditures for office, $700. 

Expenditures for Southern District $;i;i5() .58, of 
which .$2800 was for salaries of Sealer and assistant 
and $431 0.5 for horse keeping, etc. 

The whole appropriation \\as $7000, and there re- 
mains a balance unexpended of $l»f>2 02. 

Ordered to be sent down. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OP PUBLIC 
LANDS. 

The sales of lands, as made under the direction of 
the Committee on Public Lands, during the year 1872, 
have been as follows: 
One lot on Albany street, containing .3998 square 

feet, at *2 (W per foot $7,996 00 

One lot on Albany street, containing 367T square 

feet, at $2 25 pei- foot 8,273 25 

One lor on Kast Newton street, contahilng 1573 

square feet, at $1 75 per foot 2,752 75 

One lot on N, corner of Third street, contiiining 

62.50 square feet, at $1 00 per foot 6,250 Ul> 

One lot on Camden, west of Tremont street, 

containing 6588 sq uare feet, at *1 (10 per toot . . . 6,.588 00 
Five lots on Harrison avenue, containing 9623 

square feet, at $2 '25 per toot 21,651 75 

One lot of marsh land near C'lundcn street, and 

west of the Boston & Pi-ovldence Railroad, 

containing 18,.373 square feet, at 15 cents per 

foot 2,755 95 

One lot in rear of Adams and Park streets (Ward 

16>, containing 6784 square feet, at 15 cents per 

loot $1,017 60 

One lot on Savin-Hill avenue, containing 2945 

square feet, at thirty-three cents per foot 971 85 

One lot on Savin-HiU avenue, containing 1660 

square feet, at fifteen cents per foot 249 00 

One strip of land on Thomas street, containing 

227 S(iuare feet 200 00 

Total: 15 lots, coutalulng 61,698 square feet, for 
the sum of $58,706 15 

Of the above amount there has been received 
by the Superintendent, in cash, and paid over 
to the Treasurer, the sum of $8,792 I5 



20 



BOARD OF ALDERMEISr, 



And tliei-e has Iteeu taken in bonds from the pur- 
chasers, payahle in nine annual? instalments, 
with interest 49.914 00 

Total $58,T0B 15 

Tlie committee have, during the year, leased the, 

following-named propert}': 
The wliarf on Swett street, containing 2'2.0fi0 square 

feet, for a term of five years, at $1500 per annum, and 

taxes. 
The wharf on Albany street, and opposite the City 

Hospital, containing 67.027 square feet, for a term of 

five years, at i|;f>4.?0 per annum. 
The strip of land containing 427 square feet, and 

dock connected tlierewil.h, and known as the town 

slip ifoot of Belcher's lane), for a term of . five years. 

at $.500 per annnra and taxes— the city reserving the 

the right of drainage through the saiiie. ■■ ■ '■"■ ' ' ■■ - 
The following amounts have been received by the 

Superintendent, dnriiig the year, and paid over to the 

Treasurer, viz: 

For extending the time for building upon laud 
on Albany. M. Dover and East Newton streets, 
also on Harrison and Columbus avenues $1,795 50 

For rent of land on South Bay and at South Bos- 
ton.. 1,296 50 

For rent of building on Highland street. ........ 300 00 

For rent of part of Great Bi'ewster Island 40 00 

For grass and |)asturage of laud in Ward 16. Dor- 
chester District 252 00 

Total *3,684 IM 

The expenditures charged to the appropriation for 
Public Lands during the year 1872 have been as fol- 
lows: 

Paid salary of superintendent, for one year, $1800 00; 
for the construction of sewers in East Canton and 
West Newton streets, $1010 02: for grading land on 
Third near L street, 1$-i5 m: advertising. $80 W: sta- 
tionery. $::J,'5 75; taxes to the town of Hull for Great . 
Brewster Island, to the town of Quiiicy for marsh 
land, and the town of Milton for wood lot, as owned 
by the city of Boston. $38 51 : carriage hire, $41 00: re- 
{)airingfeiice on Harrison avenue, $8 50: labor on pub- 
lic lands. $19 25: ju'inting, $2 02: expenses of the coih^ 
mittee of 1871, $.53 00: expenses of the committee of 
1872, $809 80: total, ,$4017 15. , ■ • ■ 

The amount of salable lands belonging to the City 
of Boston, in charge of the Committee on Public 
Lands, is as follows: 

At the South Endand at South Boston 9,54,134 sq.'ft. 

Wharf ijropcrtv ,............:,'.... 93,0,51 " 

Boston Highlands ; 690.5-10 " 

A\'harf property 22,060 " 

One lot on Dorchester avenue and Gibson 
street, known as the Gibson School Fund 

. property, containing about 586,427 , " 

Two lots of marsh land in the town of ' 

QUincy, containing about ; 370,910 ' 

One wood lot in the town of Milton, con- 
taining about 414,627 " 

One lot on r>ird street, containing 80,632 " 

Three lots on Comniercil street, containing 109,015 

One lot on Norfolk street, containing. 50,222 

Two lots on Codman street, contaluing 90,120 '■ 

Five lots on Ashnumt street, containing.. . 57,160 " 

Total.. ._^. 3,1518,898 sq^ft. 

Ordered to be sent down. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OP PUBLIC 
BTJILDINOS. 

Public Buildimis. The expenditures for repairs, 
alterations and improvements of public buildiugs in- 
clude all the bnildings belonging to, or hired by, the 
city (excepting schoolhouses and county buildings), 
used for the accommodation of the City Government, 
and the various departments. The amount expend- 
ed on this class of buildings for the past year has 
been $93,765 96, as follows: 

Hent $4,778 31 

Fuel 2,708 48 

Care and cleaning 6,536 25 

Salaries of Superintendent, one assistant and 

clerk 6,300 00 

Alterations, repairs, water,"gas and furniture... 73,432 92 

$93,755 96 
Covnty BiiiMings. There has been expended on 
County Buildings' $22,626 89, as follows: 

Care, supplies, repairs and furniture $17,519 04 

Fuel 3,029 47 

Gas and water 2,978 38 

$22,626 89 
Sclwolhmif:es. The expenditures on these houses 
for the past year have been $263,321 43. Of this 
amount there has been expended for— 

Fuel $55,042 00 

Rents 10,102 34 

Care and cleaning 54,086 29 

Eepairs. alterations, supplies and furniture 144,090 -80 

$263,321 43 



Extraorilinoi-if ExpenaeK. The extraordinary ex- 
penses of this (U'partment are those for the erection 
of new. and alterations of old buildings, for which 
appropriations are made by order of the City Council. 

The following is a list of the buildings in progress 
of erection : 

Grammai' schoolhouso, L and Sixth streets, will be 
completed May 1. and will cost, including furniture 
and heating apparatus, about $105,000 00. 

Grammar schoolhouse, Atherton District, will be 
completed next September, and will cost about 
$50,000 00. 

Mather Schoolhouse, Ward 16. will be ready for 
occupancy in September, and will cost about $65,000. 

Hose house. Fourth and O streets. South Boston, 
will be comjileted in June, and will cost, inclnding 
land, about $20,000. 

The following apjuopriations have been made, by 
order vi tlie City (Council, for new bnildings and land 
for tlie same, work ni)on which will immediately 
commence: 

Kugiue House No. 12, appropriation $28,000 00 

Flugiue House, Ward 14, appropriation 20,000 00 

Grammar schoolhouse, Dudley District, appro- 

lirial ion ." 90,000 00 

During the past year the following buildings have 
been comjjleted. The cost of each, including land, is 
annexed : 

Police station house. District No. 9 $45,675 15 

Engine house No. 15 26,816 44 

Hose Mouse, Ward 15, Tremont street 29,967 24 

Engine H(iu.se No. 4. aud Lancers' Armory, Bnl- 

liiicli street 109,723 54 

ICebuilding the Lynuui Schoolhouse, damaged 

by fire Aug. 2, 1,871 ,$51,160 04 

Alterations of Public Library building, inclu(l/- 
ing tlie putting in of iii'w steam-beating ap- 
paratus and additional llrc-pi-oof work 60,934 58 

The repcn't also gives a list of the various building.s 
wlii( h have been remodelled or received extensive al- 
terations during the year, with the amount expended 
on each. 

These comprise repairs on Faneuil Hall, at a cost 
of $5:^11 HU; tiling floors of City Hall, $2927 88; re- 
pairing drains in market house, new floors, etc, 
$3013 28; outbuildings to Sherwin Schoolhouse, 
$,5283 14; Wait Schoolhouse, drains, paving yard, etc., 
$9105 66, and various other items of .$2,500 or less. 
These rcjuiirs were on five engine houses, three ho.«e 
houses, one hook and ladder house, four police sta- 
tions and lockups, one armory, offal depot, pound, 
and nineteen schoolhouses. 

The following is a comparative statement of the 
number of coiinty buildings, public buildings and 
schoolhouses, together with the number of feet of 
land covered by the same between the years 1864 and 
1873: 

2 . =|a ^ . =|a I 

«S .goS «S .So2 «>^ 
^ y. 5^ ; ?. .S 

County Buildings. 3 153,297 4 165,498 12,201ft. 
Public Buildings.. 32 269,337 75 1,305,744 1,036,407 ft. 
Schoolhouses 74 677,000 107 1,511,708 834,708 ft. 

Total 109 1,099,6^ 186 2,982,950 1,833,316 ft. 

The above will show a total increase in nine years 
of seventy-seven buildings, and of land equivalent to 
about forty-eight acres. 

The estimated valuation of the several county, pub- 
lic buildin<js and schoolhouses, including furniture, 
land, etc., is as follows: 

County $2,000,000 

Public buildings 5,000,000 

Schoolhouses 6,000,000 

Total $13,000,000 

The amount of fenciilg surrounding the various 
schoolhouses is equal to about nine and one-half 
miles, lineal measurement, 

A list is given of the number and location of the 
buildings belonging to or hired by the city which are 
under the char;|e of this department. 

These comprise twenty-three public buildings, four 
county buildings, thirteen police stations and lock- 
ups, twenty-one engine houses, sixteen hose houses, 
seven hook and ladder houses, five pounds, one fuel 
house, one hundred and seven schoolhouses, twenty 
schoolrooms, all but two hired at a rental of $9381, 
and sixteen wardrooms. Rooms are also hired for 
the City Solicitor and an office at Field's Corner for 
the'Superintendent of Streets, also a room in the 
Highlands for the City Surveyor, and a room has been 
leased in the building' of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society adjoining that of the Probate Building, for 



JAN.XJARY 20, 1873 



21 



IIk' uses ol' I'robal.c iiiid Registry ofliccs, for a term ol' 
lil'tci'ii ,venrs, at an aiiDual rent of $1)()()() jicr aiiiimn. 

This (Icpartnu'iit lias charge of a lot of land siliiatod 
on Dartnioutli street and Warren aveinie, containing 
(i'VJ)")!! feet, ptirehased as a sife for a high sclioolliouse. 

( (rdered to be sent down. 

ANNUAL HKt'OllT OP THE BOARD OP STKEKT C'OM- 

MissroNEns. 

'I'he annual report of tlie Board of Street Coniniis- 
siaiiers was laid liefore tlu' Board, in ))rint. 

'J'lie re))ort gives a sehedide of the various nieasincs 
before the l)oai'd during llu' .year for the laying old. 
extension and widening of streets, with the action of 
tlu^ board thereon, coniprisiug sixty-six dilferent 
projects. The estinuiteil expense of the various 
measures ui)ou which action was taken, c(nnprising 
the widening of streets in the burnt district, is $',].- 

The following statement is given: 

'i'he Board of Street Commissiouers have given 
lieariiigs during the iiast yi'ar, either ou petitions or 
orders of notice, u|)ou most of the improvements I'c- 
ferred to iu the tidile herewith transmitted. 

The important and long-scnight-foi- improvement, 
the extensicm of W'asliingtou street to llaynuu'ket 
square, urgX'd by oiu' most (uu:rgelic business nu'ii 
and largest taxpayers, furuislies a direct, nc'arly 
straight, and for the most part \ery commodious 
street from one end of the city to the other, from the 
Charles Kiver to the West Hoxbury line; and by the 
widening of Warren street from Dudley to Washing- 
tou street, in the Higlihmd District, which may be 
called an exteusion of Washington street, i)rovides a 
direct avenue from the ( 'liarles to Nepousel Klver. 
The building of the extension of A\ ashiugtou .sti'eet 
northwardly from Cornhill will, in consequence of 
thereceid lire, be delayed beyond ttie time originally 
t'onteniplated, because it was deemed inadvisable for 
tlie present to dispossess the occupants of stores on 
the line of the exrension until llie rebuilding of the 
burnt district shall, iu some degree, be completed. 

Tlie wideuLug of South Market street and its exten- 
sion to Atlantic avenue, at an expense of .$282,453 50, 
seemed to be absolutely demanded for the greatly in- 
creased business in that locality. This improvement 
was previously suhmifted to the Council by resolve 
and order, but did not receive its sanction, nor did 
the contemplated extensi(ni of Commerce street. 

The widening of Wilson's lane to a width of fifty 
feet for the extension of Devonshire street, which hail 
been rejected by the Council, was again submitted to 
it and sustained by great unanimity. This extension 
of Devonshire strcefwill atlord great relief to Wash- 
ington street, furnishing, as it does, a parallel road- 
way from Dock square to the extreme south end of 
the city, on a nearly level grade, generally sought for 
by heavily laden teams. A resolve and order for the 
widening of Beacli street on the southerly side, was 
sent to the Council and rejected, with a request to 
furnish an estimate of the cost of widening the street 
on the northerly side, which was promptly furnished 
by the Commissioners; hut the Council took no fur- 
ther action in the premises. It is admitted by all 
that the public necessity imperatively requires the 
widening of this street, being aow scarcely thirty 
feet wide, while all the horse cars coming from South 
Boston pass tlirough it, together with great local 
travel, the only question at issue being where the 
widening shoulcl be made. 

The widening of Eniersou street, and extending it 
westerly to Second street, effectually makes the lat- 
ter a continuous and level street from Federal street 
to the "Point," affording much needed facilities for 
heavily loaded teams from the city proper to South 
Boston Point. 

The widening of Cottage street, in the Dorchester 
District, has been called for by every consideration 
of public safety for years, being, as it was, danger- 
ously narrow at points where it curved, and where at 
times it was considerable of a thoroughfare. 

The County Commissioners of N(U'folk and the 
selsctmen of Dorchester had this widening under 
advisement, with a settled determination to make it, 
at the time of the anuexatiou of Dorchester to 
Boston, 

The pressure has been great upon the board to 
widen and straighten streets on the "burnt district." 
some jiersous contending that the streets should 'le 
made very much wider than formerly ; while others 
contend equally strong that these streets were sutti- 
ciently wide for all the purposes for which they were 
or are likely to lie used, 'i'he board has imrsued a con- 
servative course, widenhig where an exigency seemed 
to exist, and straightening when necessary, keeiiing 
in view the future wants of the public, endeavoring 
to furnish the requisite facilities demanded by in- 
. jDcreasing busjiness and travel, with the least possible 



injury or inconvenience to tlie almllers. Thus Wash- 
ington street has been widened on the hunit district 
to a with of sixty feet. Snmme]- street has been 
made a. nearly unifonn width of sixty feet from Wash- 
ington street to Uroad street, it being somewhat 
wider at what was "Church (ireen." High street has 
been widened to a width of lifty feet between Con- 
gress and Pearl streets, to make it conform to the 
width at other jKiiuts, and the widening of Purchase 
street, coinmeiiced prior to tlie liri^ at its southerly 
cud, lias been continued iiortliwardly to Oliver street, 
making the street a iiiiifoiin width all the way. 

All tlie street iin])ro\ cmeiits contemplated for the 
devastated territory have been already made by. this 
board, as far as the sur\ eyor has furuishi-d the neces- 
sary plans. 

(irdered to be sent down. 

ANNUAL WT2PORT OP THK CHIEF-OF-POLIfE. 

The annual report of the Chief-of-Police gives 
a statement of tlie Police organizat ion. the general 
divisions, boundaries of districts, officers attached 
to the Central Office and City Prison, with the olTicers 
and patrolmen cminecled with the several districts. 
The maximuni number of the force as established in 
-June last is ,550 men. but at jiri^sent it consists of 
liut .520 men, as follows: 

Chief's Office, City Prison, City Hall Watch and Su- 
perintendent's room, 25; District No, 1, 49; District 
No, 2, 71; No. H, .51; No. 4, 70; No. .5, 5:J; No. 6, 53: 
No. 7, ;^0; No. 8, 20; No. 9, 3(1; No. 10, :«; No. 11, 34. 
Total, 520. 

The 11 umber of the force at the lieginuing of the 
year was ttis men, rank and file. During the year, 
four men have died, 2(i have retired frfun thi' depart- 
ment, and K2 new officers have been added to the 
force. Notwithslaudiug the increase of the depart- 
ment, the causes for discharge, tine or reprimand 
have been less than for several years past. 

In the work of the Police the following statements 
are given: 

Arrests. 27,902: males. 22.109; females, .5733; Amer- 
icans, 9216; foreigners, lH,(i8(); non-residents, 0774; 
minors, .5:^20; commitments. 17,018, Lodgers.';i6,059; 
males, ;il, 242; females, 4817; Americans, 14,074; for- 
eigners, 21,;585; non-residents, 28,773; minors, .5044, 
Amount of property'takeiifrom prisoners 

and lodgers, and restored to thein !ii78,153 10 

. Amount of proiierly reported stolen in 

" ttie city $63,801 00 

Amount recov-ered, stolen, iu and out of 

tlie city $70,014 00 

Aggregate amoiinl of lines imposed by 

tlie courts $69,746 00 

Aggregate iniprisoiinieiil imposed liy 

same ". 146'^ yi's. 4 mos. 

Xniiilier of ilays s|K'iit ill ciiiirt 12,840 

Aiiiiiiiii! of uiuiess tee.- (Mriied .■S16.IAXJ 49 

>;iimlici- ol iarceiiies re]i()iied iu tlie cily 2.495 

Xunilier of arriwts for same ". 1,575 

Amount recehed for dog licenses S10,5B7 5U 

The iJi'iucipal causes for which arrests were made 
were as follows; 

Adultery, :i2; assault and battery, 2019; felonious 
assault, 2138; assault im an olhcer, 32; attempt to 
rescue a prisoner, 22; breaking anil entering, 05; com- 
mon drunkard, 481: delirium tremens, .50; disorderly, 
5::i8(); disturbing the jieace, 4ti8; drunkenness, 11,220; 
embezzlement, 51; forgery, 22; fraud. :J4; gaming on 
the Lord's Day, 04; housebreaking, 40; idle and dis- 
orderly, 257; insane. 221; keeping houses of ill fame. 
04; noisy and disiu'derly houses. 31 ; simple larceny, 
1155: felonious larceny. 477; larceny at tire. 70; mali- 
cious mischief. 202; ninrder, 11; night walking, 173; 
receiving stolen goods, 05; robbery, 1 15: shop breaking, 
231: stubborn childi'en, 71; suspicion of larceny, :^55; 
suspicious persons. 18IK: truancy. 207; vagrancy, 274; 
violation of city ordinances. :^71 ; violation of Sunday 
law, 300; witnesses, :^98. 

lender the liead niiscellaneous are the following 
statistics: 

Accidents reported, 814; arrested on wun'antia, 24'l'l; 
buildings found open and secured. 2014: cases investi- 
gated, 0129: dangerous buildings reported, .50: dead 
liodies found, 1(15: desective drains and vaults re- 
ported, 1023: defective laiuiis, -t(i97: drfeclive streets 
and sidewalks. 3829: disturbances sujijiressed, (i.5:^0; 
tires extinguished witlunit alarm, 197: intoxicated 
persons assisted home, 1778: lost children restored, 
1175; rescui'd from drowiiiug. :W; sick and injureil 
jiersons assisted. :!74; smallixix cases rejiorleil. 18:^2; 
sti-ay teams put iq), 270: street obstriiclions removed. 
25,]i)5; vessels boarded. .517; water riinniug to waste 
reported. :!39. 

By the reiiorts of the various superintendents it 
ainiears that tliere are licensed (ilO carriages. 317(> 
wagons. 00 pawnbrokers. 191 second-hand dealers, 59 
intelligence oflices, Kl auctioneers, .52 liilliai'd and 
bowling lialls, with 201 tables and alleys, 285 street 
fruit stands, 355 minors, newsboys, etc. ' 



22 



BOARD OF ALr)ERM:EN 



The whole number of permits issued during the 
year for permission to occuijy portions of streets for 
building was 13f)9. 

Building Iinpivvemeats. The building improve- 
ments in the several Police Districts dui'ing the year 
were as follows: 

a 

"^C *^'S -"O -w = 3i-»J 

rin ffi.^ Wo Ui *-' -t-cc 

5-fc; oS O it OO OO 

COCO OFQ Qp OE-i HO 

1 9 $49,300 9 $49,300 

2.... 6 $595,000 1 25,000 1 620,000 

3,... 1 ,50,000 32 823,000 2 4,300 35 877,300 

4.... 14 885,000 75 2,007,200 2 5,100 91 2,897,300 

5.... 9 197.000 159 l,379,0ai 4 11,000 172 1,587,000 

«.... 1 80,000 59 633,300 195 625,900 255 1,;«9.200 

7 .... 19 261,000 206 646,080 225 907,080 

8 .... 2 22,800 1 4.500 3 27,300 

^9 ... 8 170,000 50 551,ai0108 460,050 166 1,181,050 

10.... 1 10,000 215 1,350.000 62 226,500 278 1,586,500 

11.... 1 3.1.H.I0 63 507,000 275 1,793.600 :«9 2,303,600 

Tot'I.41 $1,990,000 684 $7,608,000 855 $3,777,030 1,580 $13,375,630 

Police Association. Number of members, 412; total 
receipts .fnoil 75, which, with other funds, amounted 
to $14,727 O.j: i)aid to sick, $2400 — worth of associa- 
tion $12,6ie 70. 

The expenditures of the Police Department for the 
year were as follows: 

Pay-rolls of otlicers , $441,851 137 

Care of stations 3,667 82 

Fuel 2,251 63 

Gas 4,038 49 

Water 770 10 

Furniture and carpets 2,818 41 

Medical attendance on sick and iujured persons 1,625 75 

Printing and stationery 1,194 30 

Repairs on police telcKraph 598 02 

iindry expenses 18,404 40 

Total tor nine months $477,220 29 

Balance in treasury 192,779 71 

Total appropriation $670,aX) 00 

Included in the foregoing statements of expendit- 
ures is the sum of ifl7,4.5(i 25, expended for pay of 
special police and for other purposes rendered neces- 
sary by the World's Peace Jubilee in June and July; 
and the sum of .$4,971 22. for extra expenses conse- 
cpient on the great tire in November. 

The Chief of Police discusses the questions of sta- 
tion houses, in some of which improvements are de- 
sired, of har1)or police boats, police telegraph, jiolice 
pistols, transportation of prisoners, the insane, night 
walking, intemperance, "our police system and the 
events of 1872."" etc. 

By a report of the police captains of the several 
districts, there are 2708 places in this city where in- 
toxicating drinks are sold, divided into four classes, 
as follows: Hotels, 54: groceries, where no bar is 
kept, but where liquors are sold in connection with 
other trade. 1119; bar rooms, where there is a bar, and 
liquor is the principal article of trade. 1:^06; jug 
rooms, where there is no bar, but where liquor is the 
principal article of trade, 289. In this classification 
beer is reckoned as intoxicating liquor, because so 
many say they got drunk on beer, and this article is 
usually sold where other liquors are kept. 

The report was ordered to be sent down. 

ANNUAL. REPORT OF THE CITY SURVEYOR. 

The annual report of the City Surveyor was laid 

before the Board in print. The expenditures during 

the year were as follows: 

Fi'om appropriation foi' City Surveyor's Depart- 
ment $24,672 93 

From appropriation tor survey of Roxbury 6,101 32 

Dorchester. . . . 4,989 75 

Total $35,764 W 

In these amounts, the salaries in the City Surveyor's 
Department, for Surveyor and twenty employes in 
ofKce, amounted to $21,842 fi7; books, stationery, 
drawing paper, etc.. $98(i 92: incidental expenses, 
$(i40 98; instruments and repairs, $517. In Roxbury, 
Surveyor and assistants, twelve persons, $5,374; Dor- 
chester, Surveyor, and assistants, seven persons, 
$3934 35. Average number of persons employed in 
ojiice, 21 ; Roxbury, 12; Dorchester, 7. Total, 40. 

Surveys, plans and profiles have been made in the 
department during the year, not including the sec- 
tional plans made in tlie Roxbury and Dorchester 
districts, of which specific mention is made. These 
comprise work on the Suffolk-street District and on 
Fort Hill and in the city proper, on fifty-eight mat- 
ters in various streets, places, etc.; in South Boston. 
thirty; East Boston, eleven; in Roxbury. fifty-five, 
and in Dorchester, fifty-three. 

lioxbiD'u Disiiict. The survey of the Roxbury 
District, commenced in July, 18119, was completed 
early in the fall of the past year, its duration having 



been almost three years; in which time from 
one to four parties, of three persons each, have been 
employed. Since the completion of the survey the 
office at Roxbury has been continued as a branch of 
the City Surveyor's oifice. 

The total cost of the survey has been $18,620, of 
which $15,1)83 87 was for salaries and the balance for 
materials, repairs, instruments and incidental ex- 
penses. 

It was originally estimated that one hundred and 
and thirty sectional plans, forty by fifty-two inches — 
the scale being twenty feet to an inch— would be suf- 
ficient to cover all the ground to be surveyed. This 
estimate was afterwards found to be too small, in 
consequence of the laying out of new streets through 
laiul which was vacant at the time the estimate was 
nuide, together with the change in the boundary line 
between Brookline and Boston, by which more terri- 
tory requiring a survey was added — increasing the 
luimber of sectional plans from one hundred and 
thirty to one hundred and sixtj'-three, the number ac- 
tually comijleted. 

Upon the completion of the survey the force was 
reduced to two parties of three persons each. These 
have been employed on surveys of streets which have 
been laid out and built upon in those sections of 
Roxbury which were first surveyed; in giving lines 
for the Superintendent of Streets, and to parties 
erecting buildings or walls upon or near the street 
lines: and in making special plans for street exten- 
sions and widenings. For the use of the Board of 
Street Commissioners, a large plan of Roxbury six 
by seven feet, on a scale of two hundred feet to the 
inch has been made: and otheis will probably be re- 
quired for the City Surveyor's and the Roxbury 
office. 

Dorchester District. The survey of the Dorchestei 
District was begun in November, 1869, just previous 
to the annexation of the town, by order of the select- 
men, and finished about the first, of September, 1872, 
at a total cost, including that expended by the town, 
of $15,190 21. Since the completion of the survey 
the office at Field's Corner has been continued as a 
branch office. 

During the gi'eater part of the year the force em- 
ployed has averaged about seven persons, consisting 
of two surveying parties and a draughtsman, and for 
about four months of two draught.^men. 

On the completi<m of ihe survey the force was re- 
duced to one pai'ty of surveyors, the draughtsmen 
being continued to copy an extra set of plans for the 
use of that office. 

The survey is shown on one hundred and sixteen 
sectional plans, three feet by four feet in size, on a 
scale of forty feet to an inch. During the pa.st year 
the out-door work of the survey has been finished, 
and about ninety sectional plans have been complet- 
ed, two sets of copies being made, one for the use of 
the Street Commissioners, the other for A he Dorchest- 
er oftice. 

A large plan, about six feet by four feet in size, 
showing the whole territory embraced in the survey, 
on a scale of 400 feet to the inch, is nearly finished. 

A consi(leral)le amount of miscellaneous work has 
also iK'en done for the Street Commissioners and 
other depai'fments of the City Government. 

A large amount of perplexing work will bo required 
in defining and deciding upon the street lines, which 
are in a very uncertain and unsatisfactory condition. 
The plans show the lines only, as existing on the 
ground, except where streets have been recently laid 
out or widened. 

A large number of new streets which have been 
laid out and built by private owners during the past 
few years have not been included in the regular sur- 
vey. These, so far as the exact lines can be ascer- 
tained, will now be added to the sectional plans as 
rapidly as the other work of the office will i)ermit. 

As a general rule the fronts only of the buildings 
■standing in the immediate vicinity of the streets have 
been shown on the plans. It is now proposed to put 
on all the building and. to some extent, the division 
lines of estates, as they will be of use in laying out 
any proposed system of new streets. V^'^ork^on these 
additions has been commenced. 

The Paving Department has required a party of 
three persons to do the current work in the Dor- 
chester District, making plans and profiles, giving 
grades and making estimates of work done under the 
dii'ection of the Superintendent of Streets. 

The party employed for the Paving Department has 
also, during the latter part of the year, -commenced a 
system of levels ftn- the i)urpose of showing "contour 
lines" ten feet apart, vei-tically, on the general plan 
of the Dorchester District. When completed this 
will be a valuable topographical plan. 

Halleck-st reel Distnct . This low territory in Rox- 
bury, lying between Tremont, Ruggles, Parker and 



JANXT.A'RA^ 



o 



O 



1 8 7 3 



€>' 



ProntiBs streets, contains about twonty-ei'sht acres, 
))cinif nearly as large as the Suffolk- street District. 
'I'lu' city was antluirized, by an act ot the L<>i,qslature 
of 1872 "to take the estates within this territory, and 
raise the grade of the streets and lots in a similar 
manner to the im])rovcments made in tlu' ChurehaiKl 
Sntl'olk street districts. The general grade ot the in- 
terior i)()rtion of the territory not liiiill. ui)on. which 
is mostly marsh, is at grade of about ten feel above 
mean low water. It is proposed to fill the cellars and 
yards to grade 14,— two feet higher than those of the 
Church and Suft'olk street districts, in order to insure 
a proper fall in the sewers to tide-water,— this terri- 
tory being much farther from the outlet of (he sewers 
than either of those districts. The grades of the 
streets will l)e fixed according to circumstances, hut 
nowhere helow "IS."' 

The Oity Surveyor was directed by the committee 
on drainage of the low districts, early in the year, 
to make surveys and plans of the entire district, 
showing all the'estates and buildings; and also pro- 
tiles with proposed grades, showing the height each 
building is to he raised. 

This survey was commenced, and a great amount 
of time and labor spent upon it; but the work was 
delayed on account of the ditliculty found in deter- 
mining the boundary lines of estates,' as many of the 
landmarks were obliterated by the filling of the creek, 
and there heing many disputed lines of 'ownership. 

The survey would have been completed, however, 
before the |.close of the year had it not been for the 
great lire of the !)th of November. 

The Biirii' MslncL Immediately after the lire, 
this department was called upon for a plan of the 
whole district, for the use of the Street Commission- 
ers and City (jovernment, showing the streets, es- 
tates, and owners' names. 

Such a plan was soon made, bj' compiling informa- 
tion already in this department; it being, however, 
only approximately correct, as no accurate survey of 
the whole district had been made. 

As it was soon decided that the entire territory 
could not be taken by the city and relaid out into a 
new system of streets'and avenues, the City Surveyor 
was called upon to propose a scheme of improving the 
existing streets by widening, straightening, and ex- 
tending them. 

These proposed street improvements were drawn 
without sufficient time being allowed for careful con- 
sideration of the subject, as there was a great desire 
to have something proposed at once; and the lines as 
proposed on this plan were shown more as a sugges- 
tion than as a plan to be finally adopted. The result 
has been that several of the proposed lines have been 
considerably modified, although some of them have 
, been adopted as originally drawn. 

(ireat difficulty has been met with in the surveys. 
in determining the old lines of the streets, as in many 
cases the front foundation walls were entirely demol- 
ished and the sidewalks broken down by the falling 
of buildings, leaving no vestige of where the former 
fronts of the buildings existed. Also the divisicm 
walls between estates were so buried up by the debris 
of bniklino-s destroyed by tlie fire, as to cause C(m."id- 
erable additional time and labor in making the sur- 
veys. 

The following-named streets were sun-(>yed, the 
takings accurately measured i)rcvious to the first of 
January, and the' orders widening them have since 
passed the City Goyernment. viz.. Washington. Sum- 
mer, High, Purchase, and I.indall streets. 

Surveys of several other streets within the district 
have been partially comiileted. and will soon be ready 
for action by the Street Commissioners. 

Eight entries have been made in the record book 
during the year for determining the true meridian 
line, and the average variati(m recorded is 11" (H)' 47" 
west of north. The foregoing statement of surveys, 
plans, etc.. was but a portion of the work performed 
during the vear, much of the wtn'k being of a miscel- 
laneous na'ture. The City Surveycn' still acts as Sec- 
retary of the Committee on Streets of the Board of 
Aldermen. 

The classification of indexed jdans gives the num- 
ber as :i827, besides which there arc many plans not 
indexed, comprising a set of fifty-two of" the streets 
of East Boston, forty of the stre'ets of South Boston, 
also plans of twenty-foot streets in South Bosttm, 
and the bound volumes of plans and profiles have 
been increased by additions of copies of plans by the 
annexation of Roxbury and-Dorchester. These'com- 
))rise seventeen which are classified as "Old." thirty 
as "New," and three volumes of insurance i)lans. 
showing widths of streets and location of buildings 
in Boston i)roper, and parts of Cambridge. Charles- 
town, Hoxbnry, East Boston and South Boston. 

Ordered to be sent down. 

HEAKING ON ORDKR OF NOTICE. 

The hearing on order of notice on petition of the 



Bay State Suspender Company, for leave to locate 
.■ind use a steam engine and boiler at No. '^-I Knee- 
lan<l street, was taken up. No person appearing in 
rel.'ition thereto, the re]jort was recommitted. 

UNKINISIIBI) BUSINESS. 

The following orders were severally read a second 
time and passed: 

Ordei' to pay heirs of Charles Stimpson $1275. for 
land taken to widen Cottage street (Ward 1(1). 

Order to pay Catherine J. Cadogan $42, for land 
taken to widen Warren street. 

Order to ])ay .1. 1. Bowdilch $()7()0, for land taken to 
u iden Summer street. 

Order to pay .1. F. Wilson $7760. for land taken to 
widen Summer street. 

Order to pay the Merchants" Exchange Company 
$]."). 540, fen- land taken to widen Lindall street. 

PAPERS PROM THE COMMON OOHNCIL. 

The following resolve and orders were severally 
passed, in concurrence: 

Resolve requesting the Board of Health to ajiply to 
City Council foi- any additional powers or facilities 
for transaction of business whicli they may need. 

Order to pay .)ohn L. Brigham $7.50, for services as 
bookkeeper on Suffolk-street District. 

Order to pay Lucius W. Knights $;^U0. for services 
as Assistant 'Su|)erintendent "on Suffolk-street Dis- 
trict. 

Order for Trustees of Public Library to open the 
reading room on Sundays from 2 to 9 P. M. Referred 
to <'ominittee on the Librai'y. 

Order for appointment of a Joint Committee to 
nominate a City Solicitor, to which Aldermen Power 
and Brown were joined. 

Order for appointment of a Joint Ccmimittee to 
nominate Trustees of the City Hospital, to which Al- 
dermen Clark and Hulbert were joined. 

The report (ju disposition of the several topics iu 
the Mayor's address was accepted in C(mcurrence. 

The order for Street Commissioners to consider the 
expediency of extending Lambert avenue to Dudley 
street was referred to the Johit Committee on Streets. 
in concurrence. 

The notice of the organization of the Board of 
Health on January 15, 187.3. by the appointment of 
Alonzo W. Boardman as Chairman, and Charles E. 
Davis, Jr., as Clerk, was ordered to be placed on file. 

ADDXTIONAl, APPROPRIATIONS FOR SEWERS. 

Alderman Power, from the Committee on Sewers, 
made a request for an additional appropriation of ten 
ihousand dollars for that department, to defray the 
necessary e.\i)eiises for the remainder of the financial 
year. 

There has been exiJi'uded from the ajipiopriation of 
$150.0(10 the sum of .$14i».8!17 '.((i. 
Tlie sewei's now Ijuilding in licmp street will re- 

i|uirc alioui ; $5.0(10 

The running e.N'penscK ot tlie department to Isl of 

Ma V :5,01m 

There is now (hie on imiiaid liills ".i.iHiU 

SUl.OtiO 
Referred to the Committee on Finance. 
Alderman (Jatheld announced that the Committee 

on Accounts had made choice of Alderman Clark as 

chairman. 

REPORTS op COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Sayward. from the Committee on Health, 
mode reports on api)lications relating to stables as 
follows: Leave to Lorenzo 1). Benner to occnjjy a 
wooden stable for two horses rear of 124 Dudley 
street; leave to withdraw on petition of II. A. Stev- 
ens and others against the stable of Robert Crosby on 
White street, action having been taken Dec. 5. 1872. 
Severally aceei)ted. 

Alderman Sayward. from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of licenses, as fol- 
lows: Chester II. (iraves, to manufacture spir- 
ituous and intoxicating liquors; New York 
Circns, to give exhibitions in this city, Soutli 
Bostfui and'' East Boston, in May next; Henry 
O. Dockham and J, II. Cummings, as auctioneers; 
to certain p(u-sons, for wagcm licenses, as a ])awn- 
broker, and for the transfer of billiard licenses, 
wagon license; also, leave to withdraw on jietition of 
William Arman, for leave to give a sparring exhibi- 
tion at Sumner Hall; also an order to revoke the 
license of Henry J. Morie, to keep an intelligence 
office. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Po\ver. from the Committee on Sewers. 
rei)(n-ted an order conlinning an assc-ssment on Oi'- 
h'ans street, ainouiiting to .$502 12. The re])(n-t was 
accepted, and the cn-der was jiassed. 

Aldei-maii Sayward U-mn the Joint Standing Com- 
mittee on Public liuildiiigs. acting upon an order from 
the City Council dated October .'5(1.1872, namely, to 
purchase u lot of land on the eorner of Wiiislovv and 



24r 



BOARD OF ALI3ERMEN, 



Dudley streets and erect thereon an engine house for 
Engine Company No. 12, made a report tliat they 
ha\e i)iirchased the land agreeable to tlie above order 
for the sum of $it73fi, leaving a balance of $18,26-1 
from the special appropriation for the purpose of 
$2S,000. 

They having teceived estimates for the erection of 
the building and find that, owing to the advance in 
huilding material since the fire, the unexpended bal- 
ance will not be suliicicnt to complete the building; 
but that an additional appropriation of $3000 will be 
required. 

In order that the building may be commenced as 
soon as pos^sible, as the old building is soon to be de- 
molished, they would recommend the passage of the 
accompanying order: 

Oidered', 1 bat the Treasurer be authorized to bor- 
row, under the direction of the Committee on Pinauee, 
the sum of .$3000; to be added to the appropriati<m for 
Engine House No. 12. 

■ 'I'he report was accepted, and the order was passed. 
Alderman Q,uincy, from the Committee on Count}' 
Accounts, to whom were referred tlie petitions of 
Thomas L. Hall worth and Caroline T. N orris, to he 
paid for land taken to widen Wai^hington avenue in 
Chelsea, made a report as follows: 

In 1871, tiie County Commissioners for the County 
of Middlesex, acting under tlie autliority conferred 
upon them I)v the General Statutes, sect. li4, chap. 17, 
establit^hed ii highway in the city of Cheli^ea and the 
town of North cTielsea, and subsequently nuide a reu- 
uisilion upon the city of Boston for the payment of 
the expenses chargeable to tlie County of Suffolk. 
This assessment was in accordance with an arrange- 
ment entered into between Boston and the other 
portions of Suffolk County in 1831, the substantial 
provisions of which were incorjiorated into the Gen- 
eral Stiitutes of 1850, as follows: 

■'Sec. 3, chap. 17. In the County of Suffolk the 
real and personal estate which on- or before the ■23d of 
June, 1831, belonged or was deemed and taken to be- 
long to said county, shall belong to or be vested in the 
city of Boston and the city of Clielsea and towns of 
North Chelsea and Winthrop shall have no right, title 
of interest therein." 

"See. (i, JOid. In the County of Suffolk the court 
houses, jails, house of correction, tire-i)roof offices 
and other necessary public buildings for tlie use of the 
county shall be provided by the city of Boston, and 
said city shall pay all county charges."' 

Although requisitions for the iniymeut of expenses 
•for laying out county roads had been assessed upon 
this city previous to 1871, the amounts assessed were 
so small that the attention of the Government had 
not been attracted particularly to the sub.iect. In 
this case the assessment amounted to about .f:W,.500, 
and the Oovernmeiit of last year recognizing the in- 
justice which was being done to the taxpayers of this 
city, applied to the Legislature to be relieved from 
future assessments for such luirposes. An act was 
accordingly passed, chap, ill, 1872, adding to the sixth 
section, as quoted above, the following words: 

"No part of the expenses incurred by the laying 
out, widening, alteration, discontinuance, building or 
repair of any highway, bridge or other way of travel 
in tlie city of Chelsea, or the towns of lievere and 
Winthrop, shall be assessed upon tlie county, of Suf- 
folk, in the city of Boston." 

A porti<ui of the damages estimated by the Middle- 
sex County Commissioners, iji their requisition on 
the first Tuesday of January, 1872, was paid last year, 
and for the purp'ose of completing the payments, the 
committee recommend the passage of the accompany- 
ing order, covering all the cases in which certificates 
have been recei\cd from the proper authorities show- 
ing that possession has been taken of the property for 
which damages were allowed: 

Ordered, That there be paid to the following- 
named jiersons the sum set against their respective 
names for damages caused by "taking land for the 
purpose of widening Washington avenue in the city 
of Chelsea, by an order of the County Commissioners 
of the Countv of Middlesex, passed on the first Tues- 
day of January, 1872. upon their giving an acquittance 
and discharge'for all damages, costs and expenses 
caused to and incurred by them, on account of said 
takings; said sums to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for the County of Suffolk, viz.: 

William C!hristv, $7.5: Samuel F. Nottage, $.52:. 
Henry H. Hall. .$47: Joliii Dodd, ,$44; J. T. Bailey, 
$49: Caleb Pratt. .'j;50: Oren W. Fiske. ,$47: Thomas 
L. Hallworth, $::i8; George E, Ciolesworthy, $:35; Tar- 
rant M. Beal, $95; Henry C. Clayton, .$()5; Louisa J. 
Manuel, $65; Caroline T. Norris, ,$65; (.ieorge A. Pat- 
rick. $65: Hoseallslev. Jr., $70; MaryE. Center, $80; 
David E. Mavo, $;^'2o; Thomas H. Carruth, $190: 
Joseph H. Sanford. $235; Mary M. Fawcett. $70: J. 
D. Farnum, .$80: J. E. M. Oilley, $205: William H. 
Hollis, $1.50; A. J. Hilbourne, $.500; heirs of Joshua 



Carter, .$.3000; William G. Thwaife, $200; J.W. Cook- 
son, .$'200: Job H. Wilkinson, assignee of J. O, Blake, 
$675; William Boydeu. $:i50; George C. Bosson, $1,500; 
.lames Hlaisdal(',$':i5il; John Magee, $.500: Chelsea High- 
land C(nn]):inv, $l(i-20; Hamlet ]5ates, $1,500; William II. 
Low, $180: J.'H. Kibbev, $180; Oliver Calef,$600; Hen- 
rv Blade, $180: Thomas H. Greeley, $5.50; Silas K. Cur- 
ry, $450; Mellon Chamberlain, $800:lvorv Wells, $100; 
Charles E.Cook, $250; Gardner Brewer, $600; A. S. 
Mclntire, $100; George W. (Jerrish, $1,500: JJ. C. Pratt, 
$600. 
The order was read once. 

NOMINATION AND ELECTION OF OFFICERS. 

Alderman (iaffield, from the joint special commit- 
tee appointed to nominate candidates for Directors 
for Public Instituticuis. made a report in part, by rec- 
omniendiug the election of the following-named per- 
sons as reiiresentatives of the City (Jonncil on said 
board; 

Board of Aldermen — Williatn Sayward. 

Common Council — William E. Bicknell, Cyrus A.^ 

Page- , ' i:,iiu,'l 

Th(! Board proceeded to an election, resulting ,&s 
follows: 'j^i 

Whole uunibin- of votes 13; i. 

AUlerniau William Sayward 12 

Couucihnaii Cyrus A. Page 10 

William E. liickiiell '..:.. ...8 

" Beiijauiin Dean 3 

" Freilerick Pease S 

Alderman Sayward and Messrs. Page and BickneU 
were declared to be elected. 

Alderman Emery, from the joint special committee 
apiiointed to nominate candidates for Trustees of 
Mount Hope Cemetery, made a report in part, recom- 
mending the election of the following-named persons 
as representatives of the City Council on said board: 

Alderman — Alanson Bigelow. 

Councilmen — (Jeorge L. Burt, Charles Darrow. 

The report was acceiited, and the Board proceeded 
to an eU-ctioii. when the several persons named were 
elected by a unanimous vote. 

Alderniau Bigelow. from the joint special commit, 
tee, to nominate candidates for Trustees of the Pub- 
lic Library, made a report in part l)y recommending 
the election of the following-named persons to rep- 
resent the City (.'onncil cm said board: 

Alderman— Jolin T. Clark. 

Councilmen — William E. Perkins, Charles A. Bur- 
ditt. 

The report was accepted and the several jjersons 
11,'imed were elected by eleven votes each. 

Alderman Bigelow. from the joint special eommit- 
tee to nominate candidates for the Cochituiite H'ater 
Boai-d. made a report in jiart. recommending the elec- 
tion of the following-named persons as representa- 
tives of tlie City Council on said board: 

Alderman — Leonard K. (^utter. 

Councilmen — Edward P. WUbur, William G. 
Thacher, 

The report was accepted, and Alderman Cutter was 
elected liy eleven votes, and the others by twelve 
votes eacli. 

OltDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman Clark — 

Ordered, That whene-\er the Committee on Streets 
of this Board deem it for the best interest of the city 
to refer claims for damages or betterments relating to 
the laying out and widening of streets to arbitration 
for sertleinent, the said committee is hereby author- 
ized so to refer such claimSj with the approval of his 
Honor the Mayor and the City Solicitor. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee on 
Paving, to contract from time to time for the pur- 
chase and exchange of horses, the supply of hay, 
grain, pa^•ing stones, gra\el and other materials re- 
quired for tile operations of the Paving Department, 
during the present municiiial year. 

Ordered. That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to lay flagging crosswalks on the public 
streets of the city, when deemed expedient by the 
Committee on Paving. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets, under 
the direction of the Committee on Paving, be au- 
thorized to furnish and set edgestones on~ any por- 
tions of public streets when the abutters desire them 
set and will pay one-half the cost thereof; also, to 
pave the gutters on jiulilic streets when deemed ex- 
pedient by the Committee on Paving. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be; 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee on 
Paving, to number or renumber any street, court or 
place within tlie city limits, whenever, in the opinion 
of said committee.' the public convenience will be 
promoted thereby. 

Ordered, That' the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee on 



JANTJAriY 20, 1873, 



^!r^ 



Pavhij^, ff) erpcf fwii'os in front of viicaiit. lots on 
pnlilic streets, where the piiblie safety I'eqnire, the 
^^anie. 

OrcU'i-ed, That the Superintendent of Streets he 
aiitliorized, under tile direetion of the Coniniitlee on 
raviufi, to ;;i-ant permits for nioviiifj;- huildinsjs thronjih 
(he public streets of the city. 

(Jrdered. That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to grunt penults to open the streets, in 
aceorduuee witli the ninth and tenth sections of the 
ordinance relating to streets. 

■ Ordered, That all matters of an unfinished nature 
relating to the improvement on Fort Hill be referred 
to a siJeeial committee, consisting of the chairmen of 
the committees on Streets, Paving and Sewers, to be 
called the Special Committee on Fort Hill Improve- 
ment, with-aufhority to e.\ercise all the powers I'elat- 
ing to settlements for contract work and other mat- 
ters relating thereto, and also all matters relating to 
the erection of temporary stru<-tures on land belong- 
ing to the city on the Fort-Hill territory, whieii were 
held by the Special ('omniitt(H' of the Hoard of Aldei'- 
men of IHT^. 

On motion of Aldernum Brown — 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Lamps be 
and he is herel)y authorized, under the approval of 
the Connnittee on Lamps, during the municipal year 
187;-i, to contract and purchase tlie lam]) jiosts, brack- 
ets, biu'uers. tips, cocks aiul such other articles as 
shall be found necessary for the carrying on of the 
Lamp Department; the cost tluM'eof to be charged to 
the appropriation for Lamjjs. 

On motion of Alderman Power — 

Ordered, That the following changes be made in 
assessments for sewers: 

Forest street—Abate .fd.") 4;j from Edward Ryan and 
assess the same amount U])on Mrs. Edward Hamilton. 

Vinton street— Abate $1(1 .i(i from M. A. King J; Son 
and assess the same amount upon J. P. Power; abate 
$^A T)] from Thonuis (ioguu and assess 'i'imotliy Snl- 
livan f 18 -It), Eugene Sulii\an $18 4(1. and John Hnmt 
$11 71. 

Eighth street— x\bate #40 8d from (ieorge H. Ever- 
son and assess the same ann)Unt upon Charles E. Dun- 
ham; abate ,f90 84 from Samuel Leeds and assess tlie 
same amount upon Patrick F. Corbett. 

Seventh street— Abate $88 ;il from (teorge H. Ever- 
son and assess the sanu' amount uv)Ou Charles E. 
Dunham. 

(iuild street— Abate f;^ll 17 from James Gnilrt and 
as.<ess $27!) 88 upon the heirs of S. (Jnild. 

Laurel street— Abate .$12 ti8froni Daniel Tucker and 
as.sess the .same amount up<m Bennett W. Welson. 

Warren .-street — Abate $d(l .^7 from assessment of 
George R. Clarke. 

Ordered, That the collection of the following sewer 
assesments be postponed until entry is made from 
the respective estates into the sewer: Aaron I), ^^'eb- 
ber. South street, $15 88; Bernard M. Cory, Thacher 
street. $8 85; Matthew McLaughlin, do., $li> 

On motion of Aldennan (Jattield— 

Ordered, That the list of jurors in this city, who 
are qualilied to serve in the several courts of the 
county of Suffolk be re\'ised by this Board and be 
posted in the f'ity Hall and Court House, and be 
thereafterwards submitted to the Commtni Council 
for revision and acceptance, pursuant to law. 

On motion of Alderman Quincy — 

Ordered, That there be paid to each member of 
Campany B, First Battalion of Cavalry, the sum cer- 
tified by the adjuntant-general as due to him for spe- 
cial duty in November last, the whole amounting to 
.f2i)15; to be charged to the appropriation for Militia 
Bounty. 

On motion of Alderman Gibson — 

Ordered, That the care of the public bells and 
clocks and the control of the appropriation for that 
object be vested In the Joint Standing Committee on 
Fire Alarms. 

On motion of Alderman Saywartl — 

Ordered, That the Board of Aldermen be and they 
are hereby authorized, in accordance with section 
fourteen, chapter fifty. General Statutes, to make 
rules and regulations to restrain sales by minors; or 
to grant licenses for minors to make such sales, on 
such terms and conditions as they shall prescribe. 

Ordered, That the expenses incurred by the Board 
of Health in the care and management of tlie Small- 
pox Hospital, be charged to the appropriation for a 
Smallpox Hospital; that the expenses incurred by 

id board in the management of the (Quarantine De- 
partment be charged to the appropriation for the 
(Quarantine Department; and that the other expenses 
incurred by said board in the exercise of the powers 
conferred upon it be charged to the appropriation 
for the Health Department. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Health be 
authorized during the present year to make contracts, 



subject to the supervision of the Committee on 
Health, for the purchase of such (piantities of hay or 
grain, and for such horses and exchanges as his de- 
l)artnient may from time to time require; also for 
such nniterial as shall he required for the u.se of the 
department. 

Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Public Buildings be authorized to supply the neces- 
sarry furniture for and cause to be made such repairs 
and cleaning as may be needed on the City Hall, po- 
lice station house, and engine houses, also other pub- 
lic buildings; the expense therefor to be charged to 
the approportion for Public Buildings. 

Ordered, That the Joint Sumding Committee on 
Public Buildings be authorized to supply the necessa- 
ry fumifiire for, and cause to be niade such repairs 
and cleaning as may be needed on the several higtr; 
grammar and primary schoolhonses; the expense 
tlierefor to be charged to the appropriati<m for 
Schoolhonses, Public Buildings. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Public Build- 
ings, under the direction of the ('ommittee on Public 
Bnildings, be authorized to i)artition the large Commit- 
tee Room in the City Hall, and place folding doors in 
the same; the expense to be charged to the approprl- 
ati(ni for Public Buildings. 

Alderman Power wished to know the reasons for 
the proposed division of tlKM'onnnittei^ room, which 
was none too large for many hearings, being often 
crowded, and the division of which would mar the 
building. He had heard that it was for the purpose 
of giving a room to the Committee on the Burnt Dis- 
trict Loan. Rooms for committees might be pro- 
vided uj) stall's, and accommodations could be pro- 
vided outside, particularly in (aseslike that of the 
Committee on the Loan, having no connection with 
lhe()rdinary action of the City (lOverninenf, and for 
which such provision is not necessary. 

Alderman Say ward re])lied rhal it was not designed 
to mutilate thi'"bnilding. but the proposed alteration 
was at the request of the Mayor and heads of depaii- 
inents, while it was in part to" accommodate the Loan 
Committee. His exiierience had been such as nevei- 
to know the committee room to be- crowded, while it 
frequently occurred that when there was a meeting of 
a committee that room and the room of Mr. Bugljee 
were both occupied. Further accoiumodati(ms out- 
side of the City Hall would lie necessary to inovide 
for the business of the several departments; l)ut in 
this case it was designed simply to run a partition 
through the centre of the room, the present doors 
serving as an entrance to each, and the two i-ooms l-o 
be connected by folding doors of twelve feet, by 
which they may be thrown into one when necessary. 
When a larger room was needed the Common Council 
Chamber could be used. 

The order was passed. 

Alderman (iibson offered the following order, 
which was referred to the Committee on Fire De- 
partment; 

Ordered, That the Committee on Fire Department 
consider the expediency of authorizing the Mayor to 
appoint a F'ire Inspector and three assistants, whose 
duty it will be to examine all buildings, public and 
private, with a view to ascertain the condition of 
matter stored, the proximity of woodwork or other 
combustible material to heating apparatus, and the 
degree of carefulness or carelessness, as the case 
may be, exhibited by the owners and occupants, and 
who will l)e empowered to enforce such precautionary 
measures as may tend to lessen the number of con- 
flagrations in this city. 

Alderman Stebbins offered the following order; 

(Jrdercd, That the Committee on Paving, together 
with the Committee on Licenses, constitute a Special 
Committee of this Board to consider and report 
what additional rules can be made for regulating 
Ijublic travel on Treinont and Washington streets 
below Boylston street, and in Dock square, with a 
view to prevent blockades and interruption to travel 
in those streets, and to afford necessary facilities to 
builders upon the easterly side of " Washington 
street. 

Alderman Stebbins, in support of the order, said it 
was framed like .s(»ne others which had l)een passed, 
by the union of two committees, to devise some plan 
by which the crowding of the streets could be obviat- 
ed. Very soon in the rebuilding of the burnt streets 
there will be much cumbering of the streets with 
building material, and something should be devised 
by which the travel may he improved. It might be 
necessary to prohibit the running of the horse cars be- 
low Boylston street, or this side of Hanover .street, or 
a remedy provided in the appointment of special po- 
liceman to prevent the blockade of the streets. 

Alderman Clark objected to the passage of the or- 
der at this time, and it was laid over. 



26 



BOARD OF ALDET^MEN. 



ORDERS OF ISrOTICE. 

On petition of Mannel Silva, against the Old Colony 
Eailroad Company for estimate of grade damages to 
his estate on Dorchester avenue. Hearing Monday, 
Fehruary 8, 4 P. M. 

On petition of Alexander Mosely, for leave to locate 
and use a steam engine and boiler in South street. 
Hearing Monday. Ii^ebniary 10, 4 P. M. 

On petition of the Middlesex Railroad Company, 
for extension of location through Washington street 
to Haymarket square. Hearinsc Monday, Februar 
10. 4 P. M. 

ORDERS READ ONCE. 

On motion of Alderman Clark- 
Orders to pay John, J. F. and J. Wanen Faxon 
$22,79(3 for land taken to widen Summer street, C. F. 



Shimrain and A. L. Vanzandt $10,120 for land taken 
to widen Washington street: to pay the heirs of Peter 
Parker and C. F. Shimmin $fjfi80 for land taken to 
widen Washingt(m street; to pay Roger S. Mcintosh 
,|234;5 30 for land taken and all" damages occasioned 
by the widening of Cottage street. 

On motion of Alderman llulbert — 

An order to re\oke a right to the Metropolitan Rail- 
road Co. to lay a track over Walnut avenue, granted 
by the city of Roxbury in 1855. 

Alderman Clark moved that when the Board ad- 
journed, it be to Thursday next, at one o'clock, when 
some matters from the Street Commissioners requir- 
ing action might be expeccted, to be in season for 
action by the other branch. 

The motion was carried. 

Adjourned to Thursday next, one o'clocrk. 



IS: ■■>..Vl 



27 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 33, 1878. 



An adjourned meeting of the Board of Aldermen 
was held this afternoon at one o'clock, Alderman Cut- 
ler, the chairman, presiding. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Railroad Police Officers — Frank Davis, Jerome 
Hastings. A. G. Whiton and George U. Patch, em- 
ployes of the Boston & Albany Railroad, as officers 
under the act of 1871, chapter 331, for railroad police, 
and the better protection of passengers upon railroad 
trains and at railroad statious. 

The appointment by the Mayor of Ephraim Emer- 
toh as his clerk was ordered to be sent down. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Joseph H. Ryan, for apportionment of his Cliff- 
Street betterments. 

Mary J. Johnson, for apportionment of Clifl'-street 
betterments. 

Severally referred to Committee on Streets. 

Jeremiah Twoomey, for leave to build a brick sta- 
ble for one horse at 321 Second street. Referred to 
Comiiiittee on Health on the part of this Board. 

Timothy Cain and others, for a sewer in George 
street. Referred to Committee on Sewers. 

Arthur P. Anderson and others, that the lamp at 
Thornton place be lighted. Referred to Committee 
on Lamps. 

W. G. White and others, that Winter street in Ward 
16 may be set apart for coasting purposes. Referred 
to Committee on Paving. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were severally read a second 
time and passed : 

Order to pay sundry persons specified. William 
Christy and others, forty-seven in number, for land 
taken and damages in the widening of Wasliington 
avenue, Chelsea, by order of the County Commission- 
ers of Middlesex County, flrst Tuesday in January, 
1873, the whole amounting to |34,500. 

Order to pay C. F. Sliimmin and A. L. Vanzant 
f 10,120 for land taken to widen Washington street. 

Order to pay heirs of Peter Parker and C. F. 
Shimmin $9n80 f»r land taken Vo widen Washington 
street. 

Order to pay J., J. P. & J.W.Faxon $22,796 for 
land taken and damages in the widening of Summer 
street. 

Order to pay R. S. Mcintosh $2343 30 for land taken 
and damages m the widening of Cottage street. 

Order constituting the Committees on Paving and 
Licenses a special committee to consider and report 
on the subject of regulating public travel in Tremont 
and Washington streets below Boylston street, and 
in Dock square, with a view to prevent blockades and 
afford facilities to builders on the easterly side of 
Washington street. 

The order to revoke the right of the Metropolitan 
Railroad Company to lay a track from the corner of 
Warren street, over Walnut avenue, to West Roxbury 
line, granted by the city of Roxbury in November, 
1855, being under consideration. 

On motion of Alderman Hulbert, it was referred to 
the Committee on Paving. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF LAMPS. 

The annual report of the Superintendent of Lamps 
was laid before the Board in print. It contains a 
table showing in detail the expenses of the past mu- 
nicipal year, a table showing the comparative ex- 
penses for six years, tables showing the number of 
lamps and comparative increase during the same 
I)eriod, with some general information and sugges- 
tions. 

During the year lamps have been replaced on the 
Suffolk-street district, and lamps have been lighted 
on Dorchester avenue from Field's Corner to the 
Lower Mills, and on a continuation of Beacon street, 
on Brighton, Western and Longwood avenues, and on 
many shorter routes. 

No change has been made in the contracts with the 
gas companies, except on the reduction from the re- 
moval of the United States tax on gas, which will 
amount yearly to $20,000. The prices paid for gas for 
public lamps is as follows: 

City proper, five sixths of one cent per hour, or 
<|2 08 1-3 per thousand feet; South Boston, one cent 
per hour, or $2 50 per thousand feet; East Boston, 
one cent per hour, or $2 50 per thousand feet ; Rox- 
bury, one cent per hour, or $2 50 per thousand feet; 



Dorchester, one and one tenth of one cent per hour, 
or $2 75 per thousand feet; Brookline, one and onc- 
tentli of one cent per hour, or $2 75 pcv thousand 
feet. 

The burners in use are known as Tuft's regnlntors, 
by which tlie (■onsinuplioii is ti.xcd at four IVcl per 
hour. The lamps arc Imriied every night, a)id n lotal 
of about three thousand eight hundrecl hours each. 

The men who light the gas Imnps are paid at the 
rate of 2% cents per himp per night, for each lamp 
lighted in the following sections of tlie city : City 
proper. 45 men; South Boston. 9; East Boston, 5; 
while in Roxbury, 18 men; Dorchester, 12 men; 
Brookliue, 1 man, — they are jiaid iit the rate of 
1 67-100 dollars per day. 

Where the men are paid l)y the lamp, the average 
of lamps to each man is seventy-seven, and those 
paid by the day average fifty-seven lamps; but tlie 
lamps are considerably fiirtluM- distant from each 
other, which is a full cqnivalciit to the number of 
lanterns in charge. 

The men employed to light the fluid lamps are paid 
at the rate of three cents per lamp per night, and the 
kerosene lamps are furnished with oil, trimmed, 
liL'hted iind taken care of at the rate of $20 per an- 
num for each lamj). The price for fluid for use in the 
city lamps is at the rate of one-tenth of one cent per 
hoiir with the exceptieu of a few naphtlia lamps fur- 
nished at a price of eighteen cents perigallon. The 
number of lanterns reported broken durnig the year 
was seventy-six hundred and thirty-one, and a con- 
siderable number were condemned as unfit for ser- 
vice. 

The luimber of gas lamps is 6344, anti the increase 
was 110 in 1868. 626 in 1869, 365 in 1870. 483 in 1871, 
and 4.56 in 1872. The increase last year in the several 
sections of the city, was 82 in the city proper, 18 in 
East Boston. 51 in South Boston, 148"in Roxbury, 112 
in Dorchester, and 45 in Brookline. There were lo- 
cated on the territory burned over in November 175 
gas lamps, which would have given the increase 631. 

The number of oil and fluid lamps is 840, there 
being a decrease in the year of i;j9, 68 in the city 
proper, :J7 in South Boston. 27 in Roxbury, 5 in Dor- 
chester, and 2 in East Boston. 
The appropriation tur the linaucial year ending 

on the 30th of April next was $370,.50O 00 

Amount expended to tlate 256,937 39 

Biilance unexpended $113,562 61 

An amount more than sufficient to meet the pay- 
ments for the remainder of the financial year. 

The expenditures have increased from $219,517 .55 
in 1867 to $272,982 88 in 18f)8, $276,0(i4 71 in 18(59, 
$324,580 47 in 1870, $337,129 07 in 1871, $3.59,085 99 in 
1872. 
Ordered to be sent down. 

WIDENING OF BEDFORD STREET. 

A communication was received from the Street 
Commissioners with a resolve and order for the 
widening of Bedford street, between Washington 
and Chauncv streets, at an estimated expense of 
$25,865. 

Alderman Clark stated that the matter had been 
under consideration by the Committee on Streets, 
and they were of opinion that the order should be 
passed at once. 

The resolve and order were passed, in concurrence. 

The details give the estimated expense as follows: 

Heirs of Ann G. F'rothiugham, Nos. 17 and 19. 80 
feet of land, $15 per foot. $f200; damages $3900---total 
$.5100. John Foster. No. 21. 65 feet, $1.5— $975; dam- 
ages $2900— total $3875. Sidney R. Morse, No. 23, 77 
feet, $15, $1155; damages .$;i850— total $5005. Massa- 
chusetts Charitable Mechanic Associaticn, 165 feet. 
C. B. Wilson and J. T. Eldredge, No. 20, 58 feet, 
$15, $870; damages $1750— $2620; unknown owners, 
passage way. :i6 feet. $10, .$360. Heirs of Joshua Ben- 
nett, No. 16, .57 feet, $20. $11 40; damages $800— $1940. 
Heirs of Peter Renfon, No. 14. 48 feet, $15, .$720; 
damages $2400— $3120. The Baptist Mission aud Un- 
ion, No. 12, 73 feet, $15. $1095; damages $27.50— $:3845. 
Total numbei- of feet of land 688. at a cost of $7,515; 
damages. $18,3.50— total, $25,865. 

Ordered to be sent down. 

WIDENING OF OTIS STREET. 

A communication was received from the Street 
Commissioners, with a re.solve and order for the wi- 
dening of Otis street, at an estimated expense of 
$.55,192, the number of feet of land being 2245, at a 
cost of $52,442, and of damages $2750. 

The resolve and order were passed and ordered to 
be sent down. 

The land taken and cost of estates are as follows: 
J., J. F. & J. Warren Faxon, corner of Summer 
street. 368 feet, $26, $9,568; damages, $750; total. $10,- 
318. James M. Beebe, paasageway. 51 feet. James 
M. Beebe, corner of Winthrop square, 694 feet, $21, 



JANTTARY 2 3 



1873 



28 



$11,574; damasos. $1000; total, $15,574. Josiali Bard- 
vvcll, ll:« feet, $*-), $a8,;!l)(); dainasios, $10(10: total. 
$39,300. 

WIT)ENIN(i OF DEVONSHIRE HTRKET. 

,\ communication was rcH'civcrt from tlio Street 
Commissioners, witli a resolve and ordi'r for tlie 
widening of Devonshire street from Siunnier to 
Franklin street, at an estimated exjjense of $98,051, 
the number of feet of laiul takeu beint;- 4008, at an 
e.xpense of $93,501, and of damases $4550. 

The resolve and order were passed, in concurrence, 
and ordered to be sent down. 

'I'lie several items of expense are as follows: John 
\V. Beals, corner of Summer street. Nos. ISti, 188 Dev- 
ousliire street, 94 feet, $30, .$-2820: damao-es $;«)— to- 
tal .$3170. Senian Klous. Nos. 155-.59, 7(i5 feet, $25. 
$19,125; damages $700 — total $19,825. Unknown 
owners, passagewav, 44 feet. Heirs of Charles O. 
Rogers. Nos. 151, 153, 192 feet, .$20, $3840; damages 
$900— total $4040. .Tames M. Beelx'. Nos. 145-9. 384 
feet, $20, $7080; damages .$400- total $8080. William 
F. Weld. Winthrop square, 780 feet, .$24, $18,720: 
damages $800— total $19,.520. II. Mollis Ilnnnewell, 
No. 148. 222 feet, $18, .$399(i: damages $400— total 
$4390. Wright & Whitman, Nos. 140-ti, 311 feet, $20, 
.$0220; damaTges $350— total $0570. H. Hollis Hunne- 
well, Nos. i:^0-8, 45 feet, .$25, $1125; damages $1.50-- 
total $1225. Edward Wigglesworth, corner of Frank- 
lin, 1031 feet, $25, $2.5.775: damages $8.50 — total 
$20-025. The same, 140 feet, .$;-iO, $4200; damages. 
$350— total $4550. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Saywardfrom the Committee on Licenses 



reported in favor of licenses as follows: Jonas H 
French as a distillei- of New England rum at the cor- 
ner of Essex and South streets. Accepted. 

ORDEK PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman Q.uincy, 

Ordered, That there be paid "to each member of 
companies 1) and E, Ninth Regiment of Infantry, the 
sum certilied l)y the Adjutant' fieneral as due to him 
for special duty in Xovember last, the whole amount- 
ing to $1180, to be charged to the ai)propriatiou for 
Militia Bounty. 

COMMITTEE TO NOMINATf; CITY SURVEYOR, 

Aldermen Gatlield and (^uincy were appointed a 
committee to be joined, to nomih'ate a candidate for ■ 
C^ity Surveyor. . .... . 

ORDER OF NOTICE. .' "■ 

On petition of Schnetzen & Abendroth, forleave 
to locate aiul use a steam boiler and engine at No.ll' 
Charlestown sti-eet. Hearing Mondav. Pebrnarv .*3 
4P.M. - ■ • '- V : 

ORDERS READ ONf'E. 

On motion of Alderman Clark— " : 

(Jrder to ]iay Jeffrey Richardson $7910 for land 
takeu and damages in the widening of Washington 
street; to pay Charlotte E. Ferris .$8300 foi- land taken 
and damages in the widening of Summer street: to 
pay Mortimer C. Ferris $7005 for land taken and dam--, 
ages in tlu' widening of High street: to pay Michael ' 
A. Ring $4030 for land taken and damages in the wid- 
emng of Purchase street. Adjourned. 



39 



COMMON" COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTONo 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUARY S3, 1873. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common Coun- 
cil was held this evening, at 7)4 o'clock, Edward O. 
Shepard, the President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF AIDERMEN. 

The annual reports of the Street Commit^s^one^^, 
City Surveyor, Superintendents of Public liuildings^ 
Public Lands, and of Damps, Sealers of Weights and 
Measures, and of the Chief of Police, were severally 
ordered to be placed on file. 

The notice of the appointment of Ephraim Emerton 
as the Mayor's clerk was ordered to be placed on file. 

The petitions of Horace C. Rose, Joseph L. Watson, 
David H. Sampson, Ira B. Orcutt, Smith & McGarigle, 
Henderson Inches, J. A. & N. Harwood, J. E. Tilton & 
Co., Thompson, Bigclow & Brown, Ebenezer E. Hill, 
Mercantile Savings Institution, Hartford Steam Boiler 
Company, the Assistant Port Physician, and of the 
Commissioner of Charles-Biver and Warren bridges, 
for an additional appropriation for bridges, were sever- 
ally referred, in concurrence. 

The following matters of reference were concurred 
in: 

Reference to the Committee on Finance of a re- 
quest for an additional appropriation of $10,000 for 
the Sewer Department, (City Doc. No. 11, 1873.) 

Reference to the Committee on the Fire Depart- 
ment of an order for said committee to consider the 
expediency of having an inspector and three assist- 
ants appointed to take and enforce such measures as 
may be necessary to lessen the number of conflagra- 
tions in this city. 

Reference to the Committee on Streets of a pream- 
ble and order from the Street Commissioners, to take 
the estate of Michael Gleeson, at tlie corner of Sum- 
mer street and High street, for the jiurpose of widen- 
ing Summer street, the same having been surrendered 
by him to tlie city as therein set fourth. 

The following orders were severally read once: 

Order authorizing a supply of such furniture and 
the making of such repairs and cleaning as may be 
needed in the City Hall, police stations, engine 
ho.ises, and other public buildings. 

Order authorizing a supply of such furniture and 
the making of such repairs" and cleaning as may be 
needed in the several schoolhouses. 

Order authorizing the Superintendent of Health to 
make contracts, sub.iect to the super\«sion of the 
Committee on Health, for horses and such materials 
as may be required for the use of the Health Depart- 
ment. 

Report and order authorizing a loan of |3000, to be 
added to the appropriation for Engine House No. 12. 

The following orders were severally passed, in con- 
currence : 

Order authorizing the making of rules and regula- 
tions concerning sales by minors. 

Order that the care of the public bells and clocks, 
and the control of the appropriation for that object, 
be vested in the Joint Standing Committee on Fire 
Alarms. 

Order that the expenses of the Board of Health in 
the care of the smallpox hospitals be charged to the 
appropriation for a Smallpox Hospital; the expenses 
of said l)oard. in the management of the (Quarantine 
Department, to the appropriation for said depart- 
ment; and the other expenses of said board, in the 
exercise of its powers, to the appropriation for the 
Health Department. 

The order authorizing a partition to be made in 
the large committee room in the City Hall, and fold- 
ing doors to be placed therein, being under consid- 
eration, — 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 inquired of the Chairman of 
the Committee on Public Buildings the nececessity 
for this measure. 

Mr, Bicknell of Ward 4 replied that more commit- 
tee rooms were needed, this room could be easily 
divided, and with sliding doors such a division could 
be made. 

Mr. Flynn said it was well known that there were 
times when a large room was needed, and when quite 
a number of people were in attendance upon commit- 
tees. The room of Mr. Bugbee was not large, having 
accommodations only for tiVe or six persons at a time, 
rphis was the only room of a large size, and it would 
Ijg unjust to old and infirm people to require them to 
CQiac up here to the Council Chamber for hearings. 



He hoped, therefore, that the room would be retained 
as it is. 

Mr. Bicknell said he would not object to have the 
order lie over. 

Mr. Plynn replied that he proposed to have it dis- 
posed of now, and moved that it be indefinitely post- 
poned. 

The motion was carried. 

STREET WIDBNINGS. 

Resolve and order for the widening of Devonshire 
street, from Summer street to Franklin street. 

Resolve and order for the widening of Otis street, 
from. Summer street to Franklin street. 

In the above cases Mr. Perkins of Ward 6 stated 
that the matter had been considered by the Commit- 
tee on Streets, and they were in favor of their pass- 
age. 

Resolve and order for the widening of Bedford 
street, from Washington to Chauncy street. 

These measures were severally passed, without op- 
position. 

ELECTION OF DIRECTORS FOR PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS. 

The report nominating Alderman William Sayward 
and William E. Bicknell and Cyrus A. Page of the 
Council as Directors for Public institutions, was ac- 
cepted, in concurrence, when the certificate of their 
election by the Board of Alderman was rnad. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 7, under a sus- 
lieiision of the rules, the Council proceeded to an 

election. 

Messrs. Burt of Ward 16, Flynn of Ward 7 and Dar- 
row of Ward 8 were appointed a committee to receive 
and count the votes, the result of which was as fol- 
lows: 

■Whoh> 11 umber ot votes 59 

Necessary ti) aelioice 30 

Alilcriiian William Sayward 59 

Couueiluiau William E. Bicknell 39 

" Cyrus A. Page 34 

" Ik'U.jaiiiiii Dean 24 

" Frederick Pease 19 

Messrs. Sayward, Bicknell and Page were declared 
to be elected, in concurrence. 

ELECTION OF TRUSTEES OF .MOUNT HOPE CEMETERY. 

The report nominating Alderman AlansonBigelow, 
and George L. Burt and Charles Darrow of the Com- 
mon Council, as Trustees of Mount Hope Cemetery, 
was accepted, in concurrence, under a suspension of 
the rules, when the certificate of their election by 
the Board of Aldermen was read, and the Council 
proceeded to an election. 

Messrs. Bmilitt of Ward l(i. Lamb of Ward 7 and 
Harrington of Ward 8 were appointed a committee 
to receive and count the votes. 

The result was a vote of 50, each of the candidates 
having the full number, and they were declared elect- 
ed, in concurrence. 

ELECTION OF TRUSTEES OP THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

The report nominating Alderman John T. Clark, 
and William E. Perkins and Charles A. Burditt of the 
Council, as Trustees of 1 he Public Library, was ac- 
cepted, the certificate of their election by the Board 
of Aldermen was read, and under a suspension of the 
rules the Council proceeded to an election. 

Messrs, Holmes of Ward fi, Morse of Ward 13, and 
Kelley of Ward 15 were appointed a committee to re- 
ceive and count the votes, the result of the balloting 
being as follows: 

Whole luiniber of votes 5:2 

Alderman John T. Clark 51 

Councilman William E. Perkins 50 

Charles A. Burditt 52 

John Brown and Frederick Pease each had 1 

Messrs. Clark, Perkins and Burditt were declared 
to be elected, in concurrence. 

ELECTION OF COCHITUATE WATER BOARD, 

The report nominating Alderman Leonard R. Cut- 
ter, and Edward P. Wilbur and William G. Thacher 
of the Council, was accepted under suspension of the 
rules, when the certificate of their election by the 
Board of Aldermen was read, and the Council pro- 
ceeded to an election. 

Messrs. Dacey of Ward 2, Woods of Ward 8, and 
McCue of W^ard 5 were appointed a committee to re- 
ceive and count the votes, the result of which was 
an unanimous vote in favor of each of the candi- 
dates, and they were severally declared to be elected, 
in concurrence. 

COMMITTEE .JOINED. 

Messrs. Brennan of Ward 13, Martin of Ward 7, 
and Hine of Ward ti were joined to the committee to 
nominate a candidate for City Surveyor. 



JTANTTARY 






3 



18 7 3. 



30 



KRPOHT OP (UWIMrsSIONER OF OHAKI.ES-HIVHR AND 
WAHKEN BKIDGES. 

The animal roporl. of the (k)iiiinis^ioiu'r of ('harles- 
Rivev and Wan-eii l)riil;i:('s was lauUx'fore thf (Ymn- 
cil in print. 

The report rel'ei's to the provisions of llie ael ol' 
1870, requiring the draw in Warren Bridge to liave a 
clear opening of thirty-six feet, and to the extensive 
improvements on the Charles.River Bridge whieh pre- 
vented the commissioners from proceeding with the 
work on the Warren Bridge. Tlie plans for rei)airs, 
which would have been done within the eslimates, 
were objected to by the Harbor Commissioners, 
which necessitated the adoption of what is l-;nowu as 
the ■■counlerbalance pivol" draw, and this involved 
the building of a foundation pile pier in the centre of 
the bridg(.', and the raising of the grade of the bridge 
tu o feet, to allow the draw to pass over the water 
pipe (Ml the north side. It was necessary, also, to re- 
move the buildings on the piers, as the new draw- 
would require much of the space occupied by them, 
and for the imrpose of replanking the whole pier, 
which was also required to be extended about seven- 
ty feet. The buildings, with the excepticm of the 
dwelling house of tlie Superintendeni, were too old 
and dilapidated to be worth preserving, and they 
were accordingly demolished, and new ones have 
been erected at a cost of $2000. 

'I'he raising of the j-oadway has been very expen- 
sive, as it required the taking up of a large quantity 
of dock mud, originally laid over the tiniliers, which 
had become very dry and hai'd to remove. The ex- 
pense was also enhanced by the necessity of raising 
the curbstones on biick foundations, and the eleva- 
tion of the sidewalks and bulkheads. In short, the 
bridge, instead of being repaired as was contem- 
plated by the ( 'lunmissioners in tlieir estimates, has 
been, with the exception of the piles and floor of the 
bridge, entirely rebuilt. The Commissioners, how- 
ever, are gratified in bo'ing able to state that all I he 
work has been done in a most thorough manner, and, 
they believe, at a less cost for material and labor than 
was anticijiated, and that it will be many years before 
this bridge will require any extensive repairs. 

JSIot withstanding the bridge has been almost en- 
tirely reconstructed during the past four months, the 
public travel was interrupted for only five weeks. 

On account of the strong wind and tidal currents, 
it has frequently been ditticult to pass a vessel through 
the draw without nnuh dehiy and inconvenience to 
the public travel; the Commissioners have therefore 
decided to try steam, instead of horse power, as the 
former can not only be used to open and close the 
draw, hut by means of an attached windlass, afford 
powerful aid in the pa.ssage of vessels thi'ough the 
bridge. If the experiment rloes not prove satisfacto- 
ry, the engine can be disposed of at a small loss, and 
the horse power be reintroduced ; but if. as it is an- 
ticipated, it should prove successful, the advantage 
will be \'ery great. 

The Commissioners were unable to agree with the 
Fitchburg Kailroad as to their liability for the ex- 
pense of raising a portion of the l)uildings belonging 
to the railroad to the new grade of the bridge. By 
mutual agreemeni the question was referred to the 
City Solicitor of Charlestown and Henry \\'. Bragg, 
Esq., who decided the law in favor of the railroad, 
.and consequently the expense must be paid from the 
Bi'idge Fund. 

The sidewalk on the north side, over the water 
pipe, has been covered with asphalt, and contrary to 
the anticipations of the Connnissioners, about .$500 
of this expense must be paid by the Bridge Commis- 
sioners, instead of the Water Board. 

The number of times the dra«' of Warren Bridge 
has been opened for the passage of vessels from Jan- 
nary 1, 18W, to January 1, 187:1 is 7724, being an in- 
erease of (iOO during the year. 

Chtrlen Hivi-r Bridge. ' Preparatory to making the 
alterations and rejiairs on Warren Bridge, important 
improvements in the machinerj^ in the draw of this 
bridge were made, that no probable accident might 
occur while the Warren Bridge was closed to public 
travel 

This was rendered more imperative from the fact, 
that by the splitting of one of the steel friction rolls, 
tlie principal truck was broken, and c(nisiderable 
damage done to the draw and gearing. This accident 
required several new trucks and gear wheels, and al- 
though it involved considerable expense, all defective 
or weak points were renewed. The draw has since 
been entirely satisfactory in its operation, and is now 
in excellent order. 

The fender guards of both bridges have been re- 
built, and the principal expendilure for the coming 
year will be in providing for new bulkheads and fence 
and repaving the roadway on Charles-River Bridge, 
which are much needed. 



The number of times the draw of this bridge has 
been ojiened for the passage of vessels from January 
1, 1872, to January 1, 1878,' was 10,270. 
The amount a|jpr<)|)riMle(l by the City Council lor the 

hnancial year ending April :!U, ISr.i was .■J.ta OUO 

Of this .sum tlu're has been expended frcim May 

1, VtiTZ, to January 1, IST:!, as follows: 

For general expenses ^SfiO^ 11 

For Charles-lJiver Bridge 1,458 16 

Foi- Wai-ren Ib-Ultre 36,593 88 



Bala 



$41,558 15 
441 85 



. , , $42,000 00 

(Jrdered to be sent up. 

ANNUAL EEPOBT OF THE STTPERINTENDENT OF SEWEBS.- 

The annual report of the Superintendent of Sewers 
gives the expenditures for the past year as follows: ' 

From the Sewer Aiqiropriations $156,070 3Cf 

3,275 39 



Fort Hil 

Paving •• 5,IK)0 OO 

'I'otal $164,345 69 

The report gives in detail the location, length, size, 
kind and cost of sewers laid during the year, a reca- 
pitulation of \^hicli gi\'es the following result: 

tlty prop<u- 6,.378 feet $24,294 17 

South Bost(Mi 9,404 '• 25,562 16 

Kiist Boston ;^,508 " 11,452 22 

b'i'xbury 14,579 " 49,855 04 

Dorcliesler 2.682 " 27,007 96 

Miscellaneous 26,174 14 



Total 36,550 ft. or nearly 7 m. $164,.'!45 69 

lender the charge of miscellaneous expenses, 

%TZiib ()9 was for repairing sewers. |;.")14l for salaries and 

office expenses, %'irm for dredging Roxburv canal. 

and $2471 for land purchased. 

Whole length of sewers in the cily. about 12:^ miles. 

01 tlie anionni expeniled Iroin the "Sewer" Ap- 
pi'oprialicni, there has lieen ussesseil upon es- 
tates beiieliteil. the anionnt of $69,652 80- 

The Treasnri-r has (■(jllecteil. during thcj'year. as- 
sessnieiifs aiiKJUntiiiH t4) ". 56.984 3'.^ 

The Supei-intcndent lias ccjllected and paid hito 
the Treasm-v. fiimi tees, use of tools, warfage, 
etc 2,060 35 



Total conecliDiis $59,044 67 

During the year 1.S71 permits have been given to 
construct or repair drains. 62 manhole covers renewed 
with iron, and twenty with wood: and 148 manholes 
cleaned, containing 281 loads of sewage matter. 

For the first time, an atfem])! is making to continue 
sewer building through the winti'r, in constructing 
the large stone sewer across the marshes in Kemfi 
street, Washington \'illage. Two or three other con- 
tracts aie still iinfinislied. upon which work will be 
resumed in the spring. The covering of the lower 
end of St(my Brook was suspended on account of the 
unusual height of water during the summer and fall, 
but will be finished before any annoyance can be 
caused by the offensive exhalations from it in the 
heat of summer. 

No damage except breaking a few manhole covers 
\\'as caused by the great fire, and the only change pro- 
pos'ed in the sewerage of the district is the mueh- 
ueeded deepening of the Summer-street sewer which 
was originally built for house drainage, and is not 
low enough for the basements of store's. 

A large amount of work will be needed in the con- 
struction of main outlets and the lower branches of 
sewers in Dorchester. This class of work is most ex- 
pen.><ive and produces no return in assessments. 

It seems almost imperative that streets should be 
laid out in the unimiiroved territory of D(n-cliester 
and Roxbury, along the lowest lines of the valleys, or 
else this department will be forced to go to almost as 
much expense to take land for sewers, to make the 
main lines of the several systems. During the ensu- 
ing year some action of this kind must be taken, 
either by the Street Commissioners or by this depart- 
ment. 

The rainfall of the year amounted to 58.04 inches. 

(Irdered to be sent u]). 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERIiEn. 

H. W. Putnam, for a recount of the votes cast at 
the recent election in Ward 15, ccmtesting the claims 
to seats in the Common Cmincil of the sitting inem- 
hers, Messrs. Thacher, Bleiler, Edwards and Kel- 
ley. 

OeorgeM. Hobbs, also contesting the claims of the 
sitting members in the Council from Ward 15, and 
asking for a recount of the votes. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Elections. 

Henry Pigeon & S(ms. for leave to erect a building 
beyond the legal limits. Referred to the Committee 
on Survey and Inspection of Buildings. 

W. P. Kennard, chairman of citizens" meeting, that 
permits for building on the line of proposed exten- 



31 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



Sion of Chauncy street be refused, and those granted 
"be revoked, until the question of extension is settled. 
Referred to the Committee on Streets. 

O. W. Holmes, P. W. Chandler. Harvey Jewell and 
79 others, for a fire engine on the Back Bay. 

Boston Oakum Company. Pearson Brothers & Co. 
and Globe ]Sfail Company, for better facilities for ex- 
tinguishing fires, by permanent attachment of hose 
to hydrants on Norfolk avenue 
■ Severally referred to Committee on Fire Depart- 
ment. 

ELECTION OP DIRECTORS OP EAST BOSTON PERRIES. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 6. from the .ioint special 
committee appointed to nominate candidates for Di- 
rectors of East Boston Ferries, made a report, rec- 
ommending the election of the following-named per- 
sons to represent the City Council on said Board: 
; Alderman— Solomon B. Stebbins. 

Common Council — Joshua Weston, Asa H. Calon. 

The report was accepted, under a suspension of the 
niles, and the Council proceeded to an election. 

Messrs. Perkins of Ward tj, Warren of Ward V2. and 
Train of Ward 13 were appointed a committee to re- 
ceive sort and count the votes. The result was the 
election of Aldei-man Stebbins and Mr. Weston by an 
unanimous ^•ote of 5.i, and Mr. Caton by a vote of 52. 

Messrs. Stebbins, Weston and Caton were declared 
to be elected. 

The report was sent up. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

• Mr. Bnrt of Ward l(i, from the committee to 
whom was referred the petition of John Donnelly to 
be compensated for the use of liis horse and wagon 
by the Fire Department at the recent fire, made a re- 
port recommending ^the passage of the following 
order: 

Ordered, That there be allowed and paid to the said 
John Donnelly the snm of ^1.50; the same to be charg- 
ed to the appropriation for the Fire Department. 

The report was accepted, and the order was passed. 

Mr. West, from the Committee on Finance, made a 
report that they have had a conference with the 
Commissioners appointed under the authority of the 
act of the Massachusetts Legislature of December T, 
1872. accepted by the City Council, December 20. 1872. 
for making loans secured by mortgage on pioperty 
on the burnt district, and ask for file passage of the 
accompanying order. 

Signed by Henrt L. Pierce, 

Chairman. 

Ordered, That under the authority of the act of the 
General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, approved by the Governor Dec. 7, 1872, and ac- 
cepted by the City Council of Boston Dec. 20, 1872. 
there l)e issued to the Commissioners appointed in 
conformity to said act, bonds of the city of Boston 
for negotiation, either in currency, gold or sterling 
bonds, in compliance with the terms of said act, the 
amount of .■jf.'i.OOO.OOO, being the first instalment of 
.|20.000.f)0n authorized by said act: the said loan to be 
denominated the Summer-street Fu'e Loan. 

The order w'as read once. 

On motion of Mr. Perkins of Ward 6, an order was 
adopted for the appointment of a committee to nom- 
inate Overseers of the Poor. 

Messrs. Perkins of Ward 6, Burt of Ward 16 and 
Woodward of Ward 13 were appointed the commiit- 
tee.to be .ioined. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Mr. Blackmar of Ward 10— 
■ Ordered, That the Auditor of Accounts be and he 
bereby is authorized to allow for payment to the City 
Treasurer the sum of $1000, being the amount paid by 
him on a writ of execution issued liy the Superior 
Court. Suffolk County, January term^ 1873, in favor 
of Louis Frazier, for in.iuries sustained by defect in 
a highway: said amount to be charged to the appro- 
priation for Incidental Expenses. 

On motion of Mr. Martin of Ward 7 — 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be requested 
to appoint the members of the Common Council 
special police officers without pay. 

On motion of Mr. Holmes of Ward (i — 

Ordered. That the Joint Standing Committee on 
• Fire Department consider and report upon the expe- 
diency of giving the right of way to steam fire en- 
gines, hose companies and hook and ladder compa- 
nies on going to fires. 

Mr. Wells of Ward 3 believed the firemen had the 
right of way, now, as the 'gentleman ^^■ould probably 
find should he get in their way wliile they are going to 
fires. 

Mr. Holmes replied that the Fire Department might 
assume that right, but he had been assured that they 
did not have it, and it would be as well to provide for 
giving it to them. 

On motion of Mr. Dean of Ward 12 — 



Ordered, That tlie Joint Standing Committee on 
Health be requested to endeavor as far as possible, in 
con,iunction with the Board of Health, or otherwise, 
to so construct liospitals for persons atfiicted with 
infectious diseases that tlie air escaping therefrom 
sliall be disinfected as far as possible. 

Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
the Survey and Inspection of Buildings be requested 
to consider and repent what measures may be neces- 
sary to be taken in relation to water pipes in build- 
ings, so that they shall not be liable to injury by the 
freezing of water therein. 

THE BADOE QUESTION. 

Mr. Martin of Ward 7 offered the following order: 

Ordered, That a special committee of three be ap- 
pointed to procure suitalile badges for members of 
the Common Council; the expense to be charged to 
the contingent expenses of tht- Common Council. 

Mr. Wes~t of Ward l(i said he would suggest that a 
little economy be exercised in this matter; for at this 
time tliey could not afford to pour out money like 
water, and liadges might lie procured a little less ex- 
pensive than heretofore. 

Mr. Pease of Ward 1 stated that when lie came into 
the Council he was opposed to the members orna- 
menting themselves \\ ith liadges. bnt during the re- 
cent fire he found badges to be of great benefit and 
desirable. There slioulrt lie some badge for members 
of the Council, but he objected to buying badges and 
having the mcmbeis take them away wTth them on 
leaving the (ilo\'ernmen1. There might be decent 
badges procured, witli the .simple stamp upon them 
■'Boston City Council, "" and on going out of office, 
the members should leave them. 

Mr. West suggest ed that with such a mark upon 
them alone, there wcuild be nothing to prevent their 
being counterfeited. 

Mr. Denny of Ward 9, said he supposed the badges 
to lie the same they were three or four years ago, 
wlieii he was in the Council, and a provision 
might be made for those alone who had none. If 
they were the same substantially, with the exception 
of the date, there would be no necessity for provid- 
ing all the members with new ones. He moved that 
an amendment be made to that effect. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward il said he opposed the procur- 
ing of badges last year, but found them to be useful. 
He was in favor of the suggestion of the gentleman 
from Ward 16, of economy in expenditures for 
badges. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 opposed the amendment and 
stated that a member of the Council of 1869 shoved 
up his badge, and it might now lie seen worn by an 
usher of the Boston Theatre. 

Mr. Denny said he was a member of the Council of 
1869, but haVl not iiarted with his badge. The badge 
of 1869 was the same as that of 1868. 

Mr. Pickering of Ward 6 believed the objection 
could be met by the proposition of the gentleman 
from Ward 1, by which every member of the Council 
on retiring should leave his badge with the City Mes- 
senger. There would then be no spouting of them or 
sporting of them on the lappels of ushers. 

Mr. Pease believed they could obviate the whole 
difficulty by having the city seal on the badge, marked 
simply with the words "City Council," then, with 
delivering them up, they would last through all time. 

The amendment of Mr. Denny was lost, when the 
order was passed. 

Mr. Burt of Ward 16 offered the following orders, 
which were severally read once: 

Ordered, That there be allowed and paid for extra 
work and material furnished by the Atlantic Works 
and others, on the fire boat, as per order of the Com- 
mittee on Fire Department, the sum of $4646 69; the 
same to be charg(?d to the appropriation for the Fire 
Department. 

Ordered, That the Chief Engineer of the Fire De- 
partment be and hereby is authorized, with the ap- 
proval of the Joint Standing Committee on Fire De- 
partment, to make such purchases of hay, grahi and 
horses, and make the necessary repairs on hose and 
furnish such material and supplies for the use of this 
department as may lie needed from time to time dur- 
ing the present municipal year: the same to be 
charged to the appropriation for the Fire Depart- 
ment. 

Ordered, That the Chief Engineer of the Fire De- 
partment be and herebj- is authorized, with the ap- 
proval of the Joint Standing Committee of the Fire 
Department, to make such repairs as may be needed 
on the engines, hose and hook aud ladder carriages 
from time to time during the present municipal year, 
provided the expense of said repairs does not exceed 
the sum of $1000 on any one piece of apparatus at one 
time; the same to be charged to the appropriation for 
the Fire Department. 

Adjourned. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



32 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of tlic- Boivrd of Aldtrmeu, 

JANUAKY ^7, ly7;5. 



Tho leaulur weekly meeting of the Board of Aldei'- 
meii was held this ufternooir at four o'elook. Alder- 
man Cutter, the Chairman, presiding. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Special Police Ofticers without pay — James Morse 
and Edward Barnes for Washington" Village, Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church: Lewis F. Rogers for Beacon. 
jVlaril)oroHgh, B'airfleld and Gloucester streets; George 
E. Hosier for the southern portion of the city. 

E. K. Smyth, Joseph E. Dow, James W. Wayland. 
Asa Porter,' John P. Chase, Augustus E. Trask, Ira 
M. Lyon and Alexander Campbell, for duly in the 
Board of Health. 

OPFMCBRS OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Foremen -Engine Company No. 1, Frederick S. 
Wright; No. 2, i)avid Smith; ";i Frederick M. Hines: 
4, Joseph Pierce; .5. George A. Tucker; ti, Henry 
Daniels: 7, Daniel T. Harden; 9. Samuel L. Powle; 
10, James Porter: 11, Alauson C. Keene; 12, Moses 
N.Hubbard; b'l Ounad L. Kosemere; 14, Levyis P. 
Webber; 15, Nicholas C. Cogley; l(i, VVilliam W. 
Cai'sley; IT, John F. Greenwood; 18. J. Foster He\y- 
ins; IK, (Jeorge F. Fenno; 2U, George G. Dennison; 
21. James B. Graham. 

Foremen- -Hose Company No. 1. Benjamiu B. 
Brownell: 2. Nathan S. Brown; 8, Alfred A. Young: 
4. John H. liC Cain; :>. George C. Fernald: K, .lohn 
H. Weston: 7, Charles G. Green; 8, Charles H. Prince; 
9. 'i'houuis C. Byrnes; 10. John L. Bowers. 

Hook and Ladder. No. 1 -Daniel C. Bickford, Fore- 
man: Isaiah H.VS'are, Assistant Foreman; Thomas E. 
■ Fennelly. Oscar B. Bnssey, Royal A. Kimball. Charles 
H. Kno.x. Rakemen; Joseph M. Hodet, Thomas B. 
Flannagan, William .1. Hicks, George F. Griffin, 
Axemen. 

Hook & Ladder No. 2 — Charles Simmons, Foi'e- 
man; Alden S. Turner, Assistant-Foreman; George 
Chilcott, Leroy P. La\yrence. Stephen C. Stinson. Ed- 
win Fish, Rakemen; James W. Sea\ey, John H.El- 
liot. John Feuno. George A. Brown, Axemen. 

Hook & Ladder No. H — Isaac K. Jennings, Fore- 
man; Hiram D. Smith, Assistant-Foreman; John W. 
Chase. Nathan B. Whitman, Robert B. Riley. George 
O. Ladd. Rakemen: Silas Jaquith, George W. War- 
ren, Christopher J. Buriill, George A. KennLson. Axe- 
men. 

Hook & Ladder Company No. ."j— John B. Hill. 
Foreman; Laurin M. Clifford, Assistant-Fcu'eman; 
Joseph J. Bell, Anthony Martin, John A. Hodgkins. 
Samuel L. Whitney, Rakemen; John H. Howard. 
Appleton Lathe. A. E. Good\yin. Dayid Kurrus, 
Axemen. 

Hook & Ladder Company No. fi — Edmund B. Smith. 
Foreman: Samuel Hridgett. Assistant-Foreman: 
Elijah Piper. James H. Bourne, Axemen. 

Hook & Ladder Company No. 7 — Edmund Fru- 
ean. Foreman; Lewis P. Bird, Assistant-Foreman. 

Members of the Fir(j Department— E. F. Field, Ei- 
ward L. Bowers, George H. Carter. Clarence O. 
Poland, Lewis P. Abbott, George O. Ladd, Charles E. 
Nutter— se\erally to take effect February 1. 

William Hall, Jr., as permanent member, to take 
effact (m the 1st of February. 

The nominations of David W. Herrick as Sergeant 
of Police, and of Jacob T. Beers as Truant Officer, to 
fill a vacancy, were referred to the Committee on 
Police. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

S. F. Marks & Son, for leave to occupy a wooden 
stable for four horses on Blue-Hill avenue, near How- 
ard street. 

E. W. E. Tompson, for leave to occupy a wooden 
stable for eight horses on Ward street, near Parker 
street. 

Charles Newhall, for leave to occupy a wooden sta- 
ble for Ave horses on Wales street, near Harvard 
street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Health on 
part of this Board. 

Catharine E. Sullivan, for grade at Nos. 83 and 85 
Cove street. 

C. E. Jackson, to be paid for grade damages at 124 
Essex street. 

Lang & Delano and others, that a portion of India 
wharf be called "India .square." 

A. D. Thompson and others, that Fifth, Sixth and 
Seventh streets be divided by name into east and 
west. 



Howland Otis, Jr., to be paid for grade damages in 
Paris street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

Ja.cob J. Banta, for pawnbroker's license at 95 Sud- 
bury street. Referred to Committee on Licenses. 

Frank Walker and others, drivers of hose and 
hook and ladder companies, that an additional man 
be placed in the several houses of said companies. 
Referred to Committee on Fire Department. 

Charles Burrill, that his claim for services rendered 
to the city of Boston be referred to arbitration: and 
Thomas Russell, George B. Ifpton, E. S. Tobey and 
A. H. Rice and others in aid of the same. 

Thomas O. H. P. Burnham, to be paid for damages 
caused by agents of the city at the recent fire. 

Josiah W. Hubbard, to be paid for loss of property 
by action of the city at the late fire. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Claims. 

Company A, Ninth Regiment, for change of armory. 
Referred to Committee on Armories. 

First Methodist Episcopal Church, for abatement 
of Hanover-street betterments. Referred to the Com- 
mittee on Streets. 

James Cruickshanks, for appointment as City For- 
ester or Superintendent of Common. Referred to 
committee on nomination of Superintendent of Com- 
mon, etc. 

Dorchester Fire Department, for increase of pay. 
Referred to Committee on Salaries. 

REPORT OP COMMISSIONERS ON SINKING FUNDS. 

The report of the Board of Commissioners on the 
Sinking Funds for the Redemption of the City Debt, 
was laid before the Board in print. 

The Commissioners say — 

The Board of Coanmissioners on the Sinking Funds 
for the Redemption of the Debt of the City of Bos- 
ton, have the honor of presenting to the City Council 
their fourth semi-annual report for the six months 
ending December :}1. 1872. 
The grow funded dcl)t. December 31, 1872, 

was *29,(>74,766 8U 

The (/roan funded debt, .1 une :», 187:2, was. . . . 28,404,677 91 

Increase of the f/>'o.«s funded debt during tlie 
six months enUing December ;S1, 1872 $1,270,088 89 



The total amount of redemption funds, De- 
cember 31, 1872, was $12,328,300 63 

The total amount olredemptlou funds. June 
Si), 1872, was 11,734,401 88 



Increase of redemption funds during the six 
months ending December 31, 1872 $593,8 



Set debt December 31, 1872, was $17,316,466 17 

A'lfi debt, June 30,1872, was 16,670,276 03 



Increase of the net debt during the six 
months ending December 31, 1872 $ 676,19 14 

The Commissioners give tables showing the condi- 
tion of the several funds, a recapitulation of which 
gives the following result: ' 

Sinking and Herenne PitniU. 

General Debt Sinldug Fund $9,625,993 59 

Water Debt SinkingFund 1,220,579 97 

Consolidated Street Improvemeut Loan Sink- 
ing Fund 392,399 2H 

Appropriation and Revenue Fund, 1871-72 922,510 19 

Suffolk-street District Sinking Fund 

" " ■■ Revenue Fund 

Coliunbus-avenue Sinking Fund 

" " Revenue Fund 

ScoUay's Building Sinking Fund 

" " Revenue Fund 

Kingston-street Widening Sinking Fund 

" " ■■ Tieyenue Fund 

Shawmut-avenue Exienslon Sinking Fund 

" " " Revenue Fund. .. 
Han'lson-avpuup Kxtension Sinking Fwnd 

'■ " " Revenue Fund 

Dudley and other streets Widening and Grad- 
ing Sinking Fimd 

Dudley and other streets Widening and (Trad- 
ing Revenue Fund 

Devonshire-street Extension Revenue f\ui<l.. 
Federal-street Bridge Widening Sinking Fund 

" " " " Revenue P'lnid 

South Market-street Extension Revenue Fund 

Congress-street Widening Revenue Fund 

Kneeland-street Widening Revenue Finid 



60;0«l 00 


13,140 88 


4,800 tX) 


1,145 35 


8,100 00 


596 16 


13,500 00 


2,636 87 


13,500 00 


2,962 SO 


18,200 00 


582 :» 


4,5l»0 tHJ 


190 50 


23,918 48 


2,550 00 


93 26 


732 84 


400 00 


268 6;^. 



$12,328,300 63 



THE DEBT. 

Total fimd d debt, June 30, 1872 $28,404,677 91 

Increase since, "city debt," $1,422,000 00 

"water debt,". , . . 100,000 00 

1,522,000 00 



Paid troBi sinking funds. . 
" revenue funds. 



62,911 U 
189,000 00 



$29,926,677 91 



251,911 U 



33 



BOARD OF ALDER :^^ EN 



' Gross funded debt, Dec; 31,1872 $29,GT4,766 80 

Less rederaptiou funds 12,3^8,300 63 

Net debt, Dec. 31, 1872 $ 17,346 ,466 17 

Ordered to be sent down. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were severally I'ead a second 
time and passed: 

Order ,to pay Charlotte E. Walcott $83(iO, for land 
taken to widen Summer street. 

Order to pay Jeffrey Richardson $7910, fior land 
taken to widen Washington street. 

Order to pay Mortimer C. Ferris $7005, for land 
taken to widen High street. 

Order to pay Michael A. Ring $4030. for land taken 
to widen Purchase stieet. , , . 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCtL. 

The petitions of O. W. Holmes, P. W. Chandler 
and others, Henry Pigeon & Sons, Pearson Brothers 
& Co., M. P. Kennard and others, weire severally, ;i'^- 
ferred in concurrence. , ■' !'' ■ ' 

The annual reports of the Superintendent of Sew- 
ers and of the Commissioner of Charles-River and 
Warren Bridges were ordered to be placed on lile. 

The following orders were seyeraUy passed, in con- 
currence: 

Report and order to pay John Donnelly $100, for 
use of horse and wagen at the time of the lire in No- 
vember last, 

Order to pay Louis Frazier $1000, for personal in- 
juries received from defect in highway. 

Order for Committee on Survey, etd., of Buildings 
to consider the best mode of placing water pipes in 
buildings to avoid frost. ,, ...:■.. ; 

Order for Committee on Fire Department to con- 
sider the expediency of providing that steam lire en- 
gines on the way to fires shall have the right of way 
through the streets. 

Order to provide, if possible, that the air escaping 
from smallpox hospitals shall be disinfected. . i 

The order for joint committee to nominate candi- 
dates for Overseers of the Poor was passed, and Al- 
dermen Brown and Bigelow were joined to the com- 
mittee. 

DIRECTORS OF EAST BOSTON FERRIES. 

The report nominating Alderman Solomon B. Stob- 
bins, Joshua Weston and Asa H. Caton of the Coun- 
cil, as Directors of East Boston Ferries,was concurred 
in, and the Board proceeded to an election, when 
Messrs. Stebbins, Weston and Caton were elected, in 
concurrence, each receiving nine votes. 

Alderman Sayward, from the Committee on Health, 
reported in favor of stables as follows: John Barry, 
to occupy a wooden stable for eight horses rear :3St2 
Commercial street; Joseph Burnett, to occupy a 
wooden stable for two horses rear .5 Henchman 
street. Accepted. 

Alderman Sayward, from the Committee on 
Health, on the subject of the permit granted to Noah 
D. Joyce, to build a stable on Laurel street, Ward 

14, reported the following order: ' '''^ ' 

Ordered, That the time for commencing the erec- 
tion of the within-mentioned stable be extended to 
April 1. 187:3. on aoconnt of frost. 
The order was passed. 

Alderman Sayward from the Committee on Licen- 
ses reported in favor of licenses, as follows: Frank- 
lin Sprague and Henry J. Clinker, as auctioneers; 
and to sundry persons for biiliard licenses and 
dealers in second-hand articles. Severally accepted. 

The committee also reported leave to withdraw on 
petition of A. Hetherston for a licen.'se as a victualler, 
and of T. P. Denny to give a variety exhibition at the 
. St. James Theatre. Accepted. ' ' 

Alderman Power, from the Committee on Steam 
Engines, reported in favor of the petition of the Bay 
State Suspender Company to locate and use a steam 
engine and boiler at No. 24 Kneeland street. :Ac- 
cepted. 

Alderman Gibson, from the Committee on the Mar- 
ket, reported in favor of the transfer of lease of half 
interest in stall No. .32 and cellar 9 of Faneuil Hall Mar- 
ket from Francis Krognian to Samuel J). Krpgman. 
Accepted. 

Alderman Cutter, from the Committee on Paving, 
to whom was referred the petition of William Claflin 
& Co. and others, in relation to Pearl street, made a 
report recommending that so much of said petition as 
relates to street lamps be referred to the Committee 
on Lamps. Accepted. 

■■ Alderman Cutter, from the same committee, report- 
ed leave to withdraw on petition of W. G. White and 
others, that Winter street, Ward l(i, beset.apart for 
coasting purposes. Accepted. , . 

Alderman- Gibson, from the Joint Standing Comit- 
teeon the Survey and Inspection of Buildings, to 



whom was referred the petition of H. Pigeon & Sons, 
for leave to erect a wooden shed beyond the legal 
dimensions at East Boston, made a report recom- 
m-ending the passage of the following order: 

Ordered, That the Inspector of Buildings be author- 
ized to issue a permit to Henry Pigeoii & Sons to 
build a wooden shed at East Boston, according to an 
application on tile in the ottice of the Department for 
the Survey and Inspection of Buildings. 

The report was accepted, and the order was passed. 

Alderman Gibson, from the same committee, to 
whom was referred the petition of E. Maclean for 
leave to erect a wooden building beyond the legal 
dimensions on Park and Adams streets, Ward 16, 
made a report recommending the passage of the fol- 
lowing order: 

Ordered, That the Inspector of Buildings be au- 
thorized to issue a permit to E. Maclean to erect a 
wooden building on Park and Adams streets. Ward 
16. in accordance with an application on file in the 
oftice of the Department for the Survey and Inspec- 
tion of Buildings; provided the said building be 
placed upon brick piers suitable to support the su- 
perstructure. 

The report was accepted and the order was passed. 

TRUSTEES OP CITY HOSPITAL. 

Alderman Clark, from the joint special committee 
appointed to nominate candidates for Trustees of the 
City Hospital, made a report in part at this time, 
recommending the electi<ni of the following named 
persons as representatives of the City Council on said 
Board of Trustees: 

Alderman — James Power. 

Common Council— Timothy J. Dacey, James F. 
Marston. 

The Board proceeded to an election, when the sev- 
eral persons named were unanimously elected. 

Alderman Emery, from the Joint ' Standing Com- 
mitte on Public Lands, to whom was referred the pe- 
tition of the Boston Cooperative Association that a: 
new bond for land sold to them be substituted to re- 
place the one injured by the late fire Nov. 9 and 10, 
1872, made a report recommending the passage of the 
accompanying order: 

Ordered^ That the Superintendent of Public Lands 
be directed to issue a new bond to the Bo.ston Co- 
operative Association for land sold them by the city on 
East Canton street, subject to such conditions as shall 
meet the approval of the City Solicitor, said bond 
to replace the one destroyed by fire Nov. 9, 10, 1872. 

The report was accepted, and the order was passed. 

Alderman Emery, from the Joint Standing Com- 
mittee on Public Lauds, made a report that ah order 
was passed by the City Council and approved by his 
Honor Mayor Gaston". January 4. 1878, \^■hereby the 
Treasurer was aulhorized to cancel certain bonds 
which were given by -John S.Blair and Charles W. 
Skinner for land purchased by them on Harrison ave- 
nue, upon their surrendering "the agreements received 
frcmi the city to convey said land, and the Superin- 
tendent of Lands was directed to issue new agree- 
ments to Ezekicl S. Johnson and Joseph F. Came, 
upon their giving to the city bonds in the amount as 
set forth by the Treasurer to be due on the bonds of 
said Blair and Skinner, said bonds and agreements to 
be dated January 1, 1873. ■ 

'i'he committee learn from the Superintendent that 
the papers could not bo prepared In season to receive 
the signatures of the late Mayor, and as the present 
incumbent was not in office on the first day of Janu- 
ary, he is pre\enfed from signing them, as the date 
cannot be changed until further action is taken by the 
City Council. 

They, therefore, recommend the passage of the ac- 
companying orders: 

Ordered. That the order passed by the Glty Council 
Jan. 4, 1873. directing certain bonds and agreements 
standing in the name of John S. Blair and Charles 
W. Skinner be cancelled and new ones be made out 
to E. S. Johnson and Joseph P. Came, and dated Jan. 
1. 1873, be and the same is hereby rescinded. 

The other order was in terms the same as the orig- 
inal which was passed, to meet the difticulty repre- 
sented by the committee. 

The report was accepted, and the orders were 
passed. 

NOMINATIONS OF CITY OFFICERS. 

Alderman Gibson, from the joint special commit- 
tee to nominate a candidate for City Messenger, made 
a report recommending the reelection of Alvah H. 
Peters. 

The report was accepted and ordered to be sent 
down. 

Alderman Stebbins. from the joint special com- 
mittee to nominate a candidate for Superintendent of 
Fire Alarms, made a report recommending the re- 
election of John F. Kennard. 



JANUARY 27, 1873. 



34 



'i'ho report was acci'iited and ordoicd to he sent 
down. 

Aldcrmun Saywurd, from tlia joint special eoin- 
lllitt<'c to nnniinate a candidate for Superinlendenl of 
I'ublic Buildings, made a report reconimendinu' the 
reelection of .James ('. Tncker. 

Tlie report was accepted and ordered to lie sent 
down. 

Alderman Power, from the Committee on Finance, 
to whom were referred the report of the Committee 
on Sewers and the commiinicaticm of the Cimnnis- 
sioiiers on the Charles-Kiver and Warren Bridges, for 
additional appropriations, reported the accompanyinfj; 
order, granting the requests: 

The Auditor of Accounts represents that the sev- 
eral Contingent funds for the joint standing commit- 
tees witliout appropriations, the Common Council 
and the Board of Alderman as exhausted. 'I'hey 
therefore embrace in the order .small transfers to said 
funds sutticient to meet the wants under those heads 
for the balance of the Hnancial year. 

(Ordered, That the Auditor of Accounts be and 
hereby is authorized to transfer from the appropria- 
tion for State tax to that for Sewers, .flO.OOO; from 
that for Lamps to lliat for Charles I^iver and Warren 
bridges, .flO.UOl); to the Contingent Fund Board of 
Aldermen, .firiOl); to the Contingent Fund of the 
Common Council, $1.")00; to the Contiugent Fund of 
the joint committees of the City Council. ,f l.oOO. 

Tlie report was accepted, and the order was passed. 

COUrST-STKEKT WIDBNINGS. 

Alderman Clark, from the Committee on Streets, 
made a report that an additicmal loan of $2,000,000 
will lie required for the widening, extending, grading 
and paving of streets within the Burnt District, so 
called, ancl for all damages and expenses in conse- 
quence thereof. 

A loan of .fl, 000,000 was authorized for this pur- 
pose hv an order of the Citv Council approved l)ec. 
28. 1872. 

Orders have already passed the City Council to 
widen the following streets, v^'hich if settled for, ac- 
cording to the award of damages made by the Board 
of Street Commissioners, would more tlian exhaust 
the present loan bv $14,418: viz., Washington street, 
$:W8,547; Summer street. $294,138: High street, $.54.- 
302: Purchase street, $93,913; Lindall street, $80,280; 
Otis street. $.5.5.192: Devonshire street. $98,0.51. Total. 
$1,014,418. 

It is impossible at the present time to estimate the 
cost of the remaining street improvements, as the 
proposed lines of widening of several of the principal 
streets have not been fully determined upon by the 
Board of Street Commissioners: but in the judgment 
of the committtee the cost of these improvements, 
iiichiding the grading, paving and other attendant ex- 
penses, will approach, if not exceed, $2,000,000. 

They would therefore recommend the passage of 
the accompanving order, making an additional loan 
of $2,000,000: ' 

Ordered, That the Treasurer l)e and hereby is au- 
thorized, under the direction of the Committee on 
Finance, to borrow the sum of .$2,000,000: the same 
to be added to the Burnt District Loan. 

Referred to the Joint Committee on Streets. 

OPENING THE PUBLIC LIBRARY ON SUNDAYS. 

Alderman Quincy, from the Joint Standing Com- 
mittee on the Public Library, to whom was referred 
the order requesting the' Trustees of the Public 
Library to open the reading room of the library on 
Sundays from 2 to 9 P. M., made a report that the or- 
der ought to pass. 

Alderman Uulbert of the committee dissented. 

The Chair laid before the Board a remonstrance 
from Henry Burroughs and others against the open- 
ing of the Public Library on Sundays. 

The question being upon the passage of the order. 
Alderman Hulbert expressed the hope that it would 
be laid over in deference to a large class of the com- 
munity who were opposed to the measure, and to the 
remonstrants. 

Alderman Clark believed it to be unnecessary to 
delay action on the subject, which had been well con- 
sidered, yet he was not particular to act upon it to- 
day. * 

The order was laid over on the sugTCstion of Alder- 
man Hulbert, who subsequently witlidrew his objec- 
tions lo immediate action, and it was taken up for 
consideration. 

Alderman Hulbert said he dissented from the pro- 
posed action of the committee for a few reasons. 
The religious consideration he would not urge, al- 
though he had decided convictions upon the sanctity of 
the Sabbath and its advantages, but he would not jji-e- 
sent his personal ideas in relation to it. His reasons 



for opposing the opening of the library on Sunday were 
tliat a large ])orli(m of the community feel deep on 
the subject, and that there was no necessity for such 
an o))ening of the library. It would be only o])ening 
a door which they believed would not be for tho pub- 
lic good, and would be to tlu'in a subject of regret 
and grief. 

The number and character of this class of the cora- 
nninity was of so much importance that they were 
entitled to their consideration, and they could not 
ignore the scruples (f so large a body of citizens. 
Others who favored the measure believed there might 
l)c some good in opening the library. Their reasons 
did not go down so deep as the religious., scruples of 
those opposed. hi ans\\-ering to their demand 
for opening the library, it may be tirged that 
those who wish can get books from the library on 
Saturday night, and ho one can suffer for want, of 
reading. 

It was said there was a lar^e class of young men 
W'ho needed such a means of improvement, hut there 
were accommodations for only from seventy-five to 
one hundred at best, and tliese few were to be pro- 
vided for. while a large body of the community were 
to be aggrieved by tlie action. Without stating his 
own convictions, lie would put it squarely that they 
had no right to ignore the convictions of so large "a 
liody of citizens. On that ground he opposed the 
passage of the order. 

Alderman Quiney stated that no one could, l)e more 
opposed than he to any attempt at Germanizing or 
Frenchifying our quiet New .England Sabbath, and 
did he believe this to be a stej) in that direction it 
would meet his earnest opposit,ion. He hoped never 
to see our theatres open on that day, nor the Sabbath 
changed into a boisterous, dissipated holiday: and 
precisely because he held .^uch views did he favor the 
passage of the order. Tlie question, as it presented 
itself to his mind, was whether llie jiroposed measure 
would or would not favor a quiet, orderly and im- 
proving manner of spending the hours of leisure 
which the industrious classes have at their command 
on that day. - . ■.■. 

It had been objected that those who now spend tlie 
Sabbath in vice would not go near the Public Library, 
open or shut. Indoubtedly this was so. but it was 
to the young men and boys who had not yet 
gone wrong, and who were at a loss what 
to do with their Sunday hours, to whom the 
doors of an institution" like this should be 
thrown wide. Nothing was, truer tliau the homely 
maxim that "Satan finds some mischief still for iclle 
hands to do." It is the young man loafing aimlessly 
about the city, because he did irt know Vhat to do 
with his time, who would be apt to accept a seat be- 
hind a fast horse if offered by a fas^ companion, and 
awake on Monday with a headache and empty pock- 
ets. It was the undoubted duty of the City Ooveru- 
nient to use every exertion towards closing liquor sa- 
loons and resorts of vice on Sunday; Init in vii.w of 
the fact that entire success in this direction cannot 
be expected before the millennium, what more sensi- 
ble course could be taken than to open the Public 
Library as an opposition .establishment and a means 
of depriving the first-n.amed places of future custom- 
ers, even if, as asserted, no effect can be exnected on 
their present habitues. . '. ■ ' 

Attention had been called to the fact that a former 
City ftovernment had asked the opinion of their 
legal adviser, which had been given to the effect that 
tlie proposed measure would I'onflict with the letter 
of the statute which forbids alT l.abfu's, except those 
of necessity or charity, on the Lord's Day. With all 
respect for" the opinion then ex|n'essed l\v the City So- 
licitor, it should not preclude the present and all sub- 
sequent city governments from faking notice of the 
fact that the point i> one upon which lawyers differ, 
a dimetrically opposite opinion having been given 
i)y the legal adviser of another city in the ('(unnion- 
wealth. The opinicm of our City Solicitor covei'cd 
two points. First, that this uu'asiire is not a work of 
necessity or charity, and. second, that not being such, 
it falls under the statute i)rohibition. (irantfng the 
first position, although controxcrted by other able 
lawyers, if it shall appear to us at this day that there 
is doubt whether tlu' inference is not too broad, is 
there anythino- in custom' courtesy or law. which ren- 
ders this opinion obligatory upon us who did not ask 
for it. The speaker theii read extracts fi'oni the 
opinion of the court in the 9th of Allen, in sui)l)ort 
of the position, that some labors vu'ither of necessity 
or charity did not fall under the statute of prohibi- 
tion. His position was. that if. notwithstanding past 
opinions of the City Solicitor there ai)pearcil room for 
a reasonable doubt, the benefit of (hat doubt should 
be given to the classes whose highest interests he 
considered the ineasme would i)romote. 

The question was taken, and the order was jjassed. 



35 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



ADDITIONAX, ACCOMMODATIONS FOR PUBLIC OFFICERS. 

Alderman Sayward, from the Committee on Public 
Buildings, to whom were referred several communica- 
tions for additional accommodations for different de- 
partments of the public business. Directors for Pub- 
lic Institutions, Assessors, and for an office for the 
Board of Health, made a report. 

The committee had learned that they could pro- 
cure the building In Pemberton square occupied by 
the Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. 
which, in many respects, was fitted for the uses for 
which it would be required, and this building could 
be had for a term of ten years at a rent of $7000 per 
annum. They accordingly report an order accept- 
ing the lease of said building for ten years on the 
terms proposed. 

On a motion to suspend the rules for the passage of 
the order, Alderman Power wished to know if the 
building was to be procured for the use alone of the 
Board of Health. If so, the board would prove to be 
a much more expensive body than was anticipated. 

Alderman Sayward replied that it was not for the 
use of the Board of Health, which it was designed 
should be kept in the City Hall. It was proposed to 
remove certain other institutions to give further 
facilities for departments of business which require 
more room. The Directors for Public Institutions 
might be removed, and there might be some other 
removals. The Assessors need more room, and had 
asked for it, and it would be better for all concerned 
that some changes be made. Such a disposition of 
the room woulcT be made as might prove to be best 
under the circumatances, yet that could not he deter- 
mined now. 

Alderman Clark said he had heard that a building 
could be had in Pemberton square for $3000 a year. 
and he wished to know whether provision was to be 
made for the work of i-evising the voting lists, which 
could be done away from the City Hall. 

Alderman Sayward replied that he had not heard 
of any building in Pemberton square which could be 
had for $3000. The revising of the votin" ILsts and 
such other business as can best be removed, could be 
accommodated in the building proposed. The Milk 
Inspector might be removed, but he could not tell 
what might be most advantageous in the way of 
changes. 

Alderman Clark wished to know whether there was 
not room in the Charity Bureau for the Board of 
Health, Milk Inspector, and other offices'? 

Alderman Sayward did not know of any room m 
the Charity Bureau, whlls they did succeed last year 
in getting one office there. 

Alderman Gibson hoped the order would be laid 
over. 

Alderman Clark said he was in favor of such 
changes in office room which would be most advan- 
tageous, but he had understood there was plenty of 
room in the Charity Bureau. 

Alderman Sayward withdrew his motion for sus- 
pension of the rules, and the order went over. 

The report of the Commissioners on the late Fire 
was presented and referred to the Committee on the 
Fire Department, 

OBDEES PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman Clark — 

Ordered, That the expense of widening Bedford 
street from Washington to Chauncy street, as author- 
ized by vote of the City Council January, 1873, and 
estimated at $25,865, be charged to the appropriation 
for Laying Out and Widening Streets. 

Ordered, That the bill of S. B. Heustis, police offi- 
cer, for extra services, amounting to $17. be allowed 
for payment by the Auditor, provided it is approved 
in the usual manner. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
and he is hereby directed to notify the owners and 



abutters on the nortliei-ly side of Milk street, between 
Devonshire and Broad streets, to close up all open- 
ings in the sidewalks and remove all obstructions ia 
front of their estates extending over the line of said 
street, within ten days; and in default thereof the 
Superintendent of Streets is hereby directed to close 
said openings and remove said obstructions at the 
expense of the owners of said estates. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be and 
he is hereby directed to notify the owners and abut- 
ters on High street, between Pearl and Gridley streets, 
to close up all openings in the sidewalks and remove 
all obstructions in front of their estates extending 
over the line of said street, within ten days: and in 
default thereof the Superintendent of Streets is here- 
by directed to close said openings and remove said 
obstructions at the expense of the owners of said 
estates. 

Ordered. That the Superintendent of Streets be 
and he is hereby directed to notify the owners and 
abutters on Devonshire street, between Milk and 
Summer streets, to close up all openings in the side- 
walks and remove all obstructions in front of their 
estates extending over the line of said street, within 
ten days: and in default thereof the Superintendent 
of Streets is hereby directed to close said <ii)cnings 
and remove said obstructions at the expense of the 
owners of said estates. 

On motion of Alderman Gibson, 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police, under the direc- 
tion of the Committee on Police, be authorized to 
purchase such supplies as are required for the Police 
Department during the ensuing year ; the expense to 
be charged to the appropriation for Police. 

Ordered, That the sum of $1940 be and hereby is 
appropriated to pay the bill of steam-tug Lewis Os- 
born for services rendered at the flre on the nights of 
Nov. 7th and 10th, and on the ruins of the following 
week: the same to be charged to the appropriation 
for the Fire Department. 

Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
the Survey and Inspection of Buildings, in connection 
with the Committee on Legislative Matters, be au- 
thorized, if in their judgment it is necessary for the 
public .safety and convenience, to apply to the Gen- 
eral Court for additional legislation to regulate the 
heiglit of buildings in the city of Boston. 

On motion of Alderman Power, 

Ordered, That the Board establish the revised 
^rade of Devonshire street, between Milk and Frank- 
lin streets, as shown on a plan and profile drawn by 
the City Surveyor, dated Jan. 23, 18T3. and deposited 
in the office of said City Surveyor. 

Alderman Hulbert offered the following order 
which was read once: 

Whereas, the public business at times requires the 
attendance of members of the City Council at hours 
that render it inconvenient for them to obtain meals 
at accustomed times and places; and whereas, it is 
reasonable that provision should be made for ob- 
taining them elsewhere; therefore 

Ordered, That there be paid to each Alderman 

dollars and to each member of the Common Council 

dollars semi-annually, to cover such expenses: 

and that no amount shall be paid from the City Treas- 
ury for refreshments or meals, beyond the sums here- 
by appropriated either by committees, individual 
members of either branch of the City Council. 

ORDERS HEAD ONCE. 

On motion of Alderman Clark- 
Orders to pay heirs of Thomas Tile.ston $15, 0^13, for 
land taken to widen Purchase street: to pay heirs of 
Mary Tileston $3720, for land taken to widen Pur- 
chase street; to pay heirs of Charles O. Rogers $8034. 
for land taken to widen Summer street. 
Adjourned. 



COMMON CO TJ NOIL, 



36 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Oommon Council, 

JANUARY aO, 1873. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common Conn- 
cil was held this evening, at TJtf o'clork, Edward O. 
Shepard. the President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The annual report of the Commissioners on the 
Sinking Fund was ordered to be placed on file. 

The report of commissioners to investigate the 
cause and management of the recent great lire, was 
referred to the Committee on Fire Department, in 
concurrence. 

The petitions of Thomas O. H. P. Burnham, 
Charles Burrill, Josiah W. Hubbard, members of the 
Fire Department in Ward Ki, Jame.s Cruickshauks, 
Company A Ninth Regiment, and the request for ad- 
ditional members of hose and hook and ladder com- 
panies, were severally referred, in concurrence. 

The remonstrance of Henry Burroughs and others 
against the opening of the Public Library on Sunday 
was ordered to be placed on file. 

The reference to the Committee on Streets of re- 
port and order authorizing a loan of $2,000,000 to be 
added to the Bnnit District loan, was concurred in. 

The following orders were severally read twice and 
passed: 

Report and orders rescinding the order concerning 
certain bonds and agreements with John S. Blair and 
Charles W. Skinner, and new ones made out to Eze- 
kiel S. Johnson and Joseph F. Came, and directing 
the issuing of other aoreements to said Johnson and 
Came on tlie terms and conditions therein set forth. 

Report and order for a permit to be issued to Hen- 
ry Pigeon & Sons to build a shed at East Boston. 
" Report and order authorizing a new bond to be is- 
sued to the Boston Cofiperative Association, for land 
sold to them b}' the city on East Canton street, on 
the conditions named in said order. 

Order authorizing the Committee on Legislative 
Matters to apply to the (General Court for additional 
legislation to regulate the height of buildings in this 
city. 

Report and order authorizing a permit to be issued 
to E. McLean to erect a wooden building on Park and 
Adams streets. Ward Ki. 

Report and order for a tratisfer from the ajjpropri- 
ation for State Tax to that for sewers of .$ "fO.OOO; from 
that for Lamps to Charles-River and Warren Bridges, 
110,000; to the Contingent Funds of the Board of 
Aldermen and CommonC'ouncil, and the Joint Com- 
mittees of the City Council, $1,500 each. 

The following orders were severally read once: 

Order that the bill of S. B. Henstis of $17, for extra 
service as a police officer, be allowed for payment, 
provided it be approved in the usual manner. 

Order that $1940 be apjiropriated to pay the hill of 
steam-tug Lewis Osbom for services at the fire of 
Nov. i)th and 10th, and during the following week. 

TRUSTEES OF CITY HOSPITAL. 

The report nominating Alderman James Power and 
Common Conncllmen Timothy J. Dacey and .lames 
P. Marston as Trustees of the City Hospital was ac- 
cepted, under suspension of the rule?, when the cer- 
tificate of the election of said persons by the Board 
of Aldermen was read, and the Council proceeded to 
an election. 

Messrs. Perkins of Ward (i, Martin of Ward 7 and 
N. Doherty of Ward 2 were appointed a committee to 
receive and count the votes, the result of which was 
as follows: 

Whole number of votes 54 

Necessary to a choice 'JH 

Alderman .James Power r>4 

Councilman Timothy J . Dacey 5:! 

Councihnan James F. Marston 53 

Messrs. Power, Dacey and Marston were declared 
to be elected, in concurrence. 

The several reports nominating Alvah H. Peters as 
City Messenger, James C. Tucker as Superintendent 
of Public Buildings, and John F. Kennard as Super- 
intendent of Fire Alarms, were read and laid over 
under the rule and ordinance. 

THE SUNDAY-LIBRARY QUESTION. 

The report in favor of the order for the opening of 
the reading rooms of the Public Library from 2 to 9 P. 
M. on Sundays, and the dissent of Charles Hulbert 
therefrom, came up for concurrence in the ac- 
ceptance of the report and the passage of the order. 

Mr. Pease of Ward 1 presented the remonstrance of 
Rev. W. C. High and forty-fourothersof East Boston 



against the opening of the Public Libi'ary on Sunday. 
Remon.strances were al.<o presented from M. Field , 
Fowler and others and from D. B. (Mieney and forty- 
seven others. 

Severally ordered to be placed on file. 

Mr. Jloliues of Ward (i made some remarks, giving 
a history of the action of the City (Government on 
this question, from 1859 to the present year, with the 
several vetoes of the orders which had been passed, 
and the opinion of the City Solicitor against the law- . 
fulness of the actj with the legislative action on the 
subject. . ■ 

In relation to the legal question, his opinion was 
that there was a fair ground for doubt, and. the only , 
way of its settlement was by a decision of the. Su- 
preme Judicial Court. It was desirable, then, that . 
the order should be passed for the purpose of . bring- 
ing the matter before the court, and he trusted that 
its passage would prevail. 

Mr. Peaseof Ward 1 believed that the opening of 
the library on Sundays was fraught \vith evil, un- 
wise, aiid of no good whatever, and was designed to 
legalize what the City Solicitor had declared to be . 
illegal. There were s'aid to be doubts about the cor- 
recliness of the opinion of the C'ity Solicitor, and so 
there had been doubts expressed about other opinions 
of the City Solicitor upon matters which had beep 
submitted to him. Some members of the Council 
appear as ready 1o jump at this measure as members 
of Congress do at. the Credit Mobilier. If it was de- 
sirable to have a legal adviser, his opinions should be 
respected, else it is not worth while to have such an 
officer. He hoped therefore that the order would not 
be passed, and called for yeas and nays on its pass- 
age, which were ordered. 

Mr. Denny of Ward 9 hoped the order would not be 
passed tonight, for he was not prepared to vote upon 
it. The new members of the Council had had no 
opportunity to judge of the merits of the case, which 
had not been before them. He was aware that the 
subject had been before the City Council in past 
years, yet it had not been before this Council in all its 
bearings. 

There were diversity of opinions held on the subject 
by the community, and while some believed it would 
be a violation of conscience to sanction such a measure, 
others believed there were those who were deprived 
of opportunities of improving their minds who would 
be benefited by opening the library. He had his own 
convictions on the subject, but was not prepared to 
discuss the subject now. The measure had been 
pressed through the Board of Aldermen without dis- 
cussion and almost without consideration. He did 
not know of any petition which had been presented 
in favor of it, but it was of sufficient importance for 
the expression of opinions of the community, while 
remonstrances had been presented against the pass- 
age of the order. 

Many i)ersons wish to be heard in opposition to it, 
and some had been to him expressing the wish to be 
heard. They should give an opportunity for such 
citizens as are in favor of it, or remonstrants, to be 
lieard by petitions or in person. He would move 
that the order he laid over or postponed one week, 
and that it be specially assigned to Thursday even- 
ing next, eight o'clock. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward .5 said he should make no objec- 
tion to the question lying over, yet he was ready to 
meet it now. He had his convictions on the subject, 
and those would lead him to oppose the measure on 
the ground of principle. Yet he was ready to pass 
the order in deference to the clamor of the people for 
the opening of the library, and have the matter set- 
tled by testing the question before the courts. If he 
thought the effect would be to lead to the opening of 
the theatres on Sunday, he should opjjose it entirely. 
He believed in the sacrechiess of the institution of 
the Sabbath, hut if it was for the interests of society 
and for the good of young men, as it was claimed, to 
have the reading room opened, as a place in which to 
spend their time more profitably than about the 
streets, or in places of vice, he would vote for the , 
order. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 9 said the remarks of the gen- 
tleman from Ward 9 reminded him of a statement of 
a gentleman from Ward 1 in the last C!ouncil, that he , 
made up his remarks on the subject forty years ago, 
yet he wished a week in wnich to consider the subject. ' 
The question had been talked upon so much that ev- 
erybody must have made up his mind on it. and there 
was no need of delay until petitions and remon- 
strances should be received. The public expect the 
City Council to pass the ordi^r. Last year there were 
a great number of petitions in favor of the measure, 
and there weie hearings, greatly to tlu^ discomfort of 
the Board of Aldermen. 

W^e know that the Calvinistic sects are all opposed 
to the opening of the Public Library on Sunday, 
while the great body of the community are in f avov 



37 



COMEMON COUNCIL, 



of it. There could be nothing gained l)y delay, and it 
would cause a long discussion. He hoped, therefore, 
that the order would not he laid over. It would re- 
quire a two-thirds vote to suspend the rules in order 
for its second reading, and it would be as wall to 
make a test of the question tonight. 

Mr. Holmes of Watd 6 said it was often embarrass- 
ing to require members of the Council to vote on 
measures when they ask for delay, and he would not 
object to laying the order over if it was desired. 

Mr. Pease inquired to whom the gentleman from 
Ward 6 referred, as having stated that he formed his 
opinions forty years ago. 

Mr. Perkins replied that it was not him to whom 
he referred. 

Mr. Cudworth of Ward 11 said he hoped the order 
would be laid over, for he had not thought of it, 
and wished to be better prepared to act upon the 
subject. There was a large class in the community 
who had conscientious scruples in many re- 
spects in relation to opening the library on 
Sundays, and it was not what many good citizens 
care to have. In days gone by good citizens had op- 
posed the measure, and that there were others in fa- 
vor it was perhaps true, but he should wish to have 
time to look into it more thoroughly before voting on 
it. 

Mr. Pickering of Ward 6 said he was prepared to 
vote upon the order, but as an act of courtesy, when 
others wished further time for deliberation, 
he was disposed to grant it. There was no hurry for 
action, for there was time enough. So far as related 
to the question of petitions in favor of opening the 
library on Sunday, there had been many petitions to 
the Cfty Council m favor (jf it. Among the remon- 
strants he noticed one who liad been a large stock- 
holder in the Metropolitan Raih-oad Company, and so 
long as the city allowed the Chestnut-Hill drive- 
way to be open on Sundays, which might be shut up, 
he could not see any objection to opening the li- 
brary. 

Mr. West of Ward 16, in reply to Mr. Pickering, 
said the gentleman referred to as a remonstrant had 
always been consistently opposed to the running of 
the horse cars on Sunday. 

Mr. Perkins urged that so long as it would require 
a two-thirds vote for a suspension of the rules, it 
would be as well to order the question to a second 
reading now and let it it go over. The order requir- 
ing an expenditure of money, it must go over under 
the rules. 

Mr. Denny said he was not disposed to express his 
own convictions now, but in deference to those who 
were not in the Council when the matter had been 
considered, and those who wished to be heard on the 
subject, he hoped it would be laid over. He was al- 
ways suspicious of measures which are rushed 
through the City Council, and remembered that when 
he was in the Council before a measure which was 
defeated at the last meeting was taken up again at 
the beginning of the next year and rushed through, 
yet afterwards was a cause for I'egret. There might 
not be the same cause for opposing this, yet when 
eftorts ai'e made to press a measure, suspicious will 
be attached to it. It could not suffer by a week's 
delay. 

Mi'. Dean of Ward 12 said it appeared from a state- 
ment of the question that all parties would be ac- 
commodated by the matters coming up a week 
hence, and that was all that each desired. If ordered 
to a second reading tonight to take its second at the 
next meeting, every one will be accommodated, and 
no one will have reason to find fault. In regard to a 
decision by the court, this question [substantially was 
before the court in 1864, when Chief-Justice Bigelow 
"ave an opinion in regard to the making of a will on 
Sunday, that, although it was not a work of necessity 
or charity, it was valid. 

Mr. Dean read at length the opinion of Judge Bige- 
low, from which he iut'erred that the same principle 
being involved, had not the City Solicitor given his 
opinion, the year before, he would not have given it. 
There could be no better opinion than that of Judge 
Bigelow, which gives as the construction of the stat- 
utes, that they Were designed to ail'ect the various 
matters which relate to the ordinary business of life, 
in restraining the carrying on of trade or traffic 
on Sunday. The law was intended not to 
carry prohibition further than this. IMr. Dean 
read also from letters of Mr. Bates to Mr. Ward 
as an object in giving money to found the Pub- 
lic Library, that he had in view a moral effect as well 
as intellectual improvement. This was shown in 
what he said of having a place well warmed and 
lighted for young men by means of which they may 
be drawn from vice and led in the right path. Would 
not the tendency, he urged, in opening the library on 
Sundays, be to draw many, very many from vice, and 
in spending their time to great moral advantage'? 



A great number of young men spend their time on 
Sundays in wandering aliout the streets, and to pro- 
vide such a place for them as was proposed by Mr. 
Bates, was it not a great charity? He could not see 
how it could be anytlilng else. He held to a proper 
observance of the Sabbath day, but could not see 
how a minister of the Christian religion could object 
to the reading of ]U-oper books on tliat day, which is 
a handmaid to CUiristianity. It was lawful to do good 
on the Sabbath day. That was the question, and that 
is all of it. 

It was difficult for him to make up his mind that 
there could be any evil in opening the library on 
that day, for it was impossilile for any one to go 'into 
the library and get any unfavorable impression. 
The room was quiet and orderly; no one is allowed 
to speak louder than in a whisper, and in walking one 
goes on tiptoe; what harm can come from it? Must 
it not, then, be all good? He hoped the order would 
be passed to a second reading, and reasons could be 
more fully given another time. 

The Chair stated that as the order involved the ex- 
penditure of money, it would go over under the rules. 

Mr. Dean said his attention had been called to the 
fact that since the City Solicitor gave his opinion as 
referred to by him, he had said his opinion was the 
same as expressed when tirst requested to give it. 

Mr. Denny believed it would be better to postpone 
and assign rather than take a vote on the order now 
for some one might now vote agahist it who may, on 
further consideration, vote in the affirmative. Thus 
would nothing be lost by voting for the assignment. 

Mr. Perkins said he was desirous of taking such 
action now that the question can be settled" at the 
next meeting of the Council, and not require two 
weeks more, for if not ordered to a second reading 
until the next meeting, then a vote of two-thirds will 
be required for a suspension of the rules. 

The questi(m was taken on the assignment, which 
was lost, when the order was ordered to a second 
reading at the next meeting of the Council. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were severally read a second 
time and passed: 

Order authorizing a supply of such furniture and 
the making of such repairs and cleaning as may be 
needed in the City Hall, police stations, engine 
houses and other pulilic buildings. 

Order authorizing a supply of such furniture and 
the making of such repairs and cleaning as may be 
needed in the several schoolhouses. 

Order authorizing the Superintendent of Health to 
make contracts, subject to the super^•ision of the 
Committee on Health, for horses and such materials 
as may be required for the use of the Health Depart- 
ment. 

Order to pay forty-six hundred and forty-six 69-100 
dollars for extra work and material furnished by the 
Atlantic Works and others, on the Are boat, by order 
of the committee. 

Order authorizing purchases to be made of hay. 
grain, horses and supplies for the Fire Department.' 

Order authorizing repairs to be made on fire en- 
gines, hose, hook and ladder carriages. 

Order authorizing a loan of three thousand dollars 
to be added to the appropriation for Engine House 
No. 12. 

Order authorizing to be issued to the commission- 
ers appointed in,conformity to the legislative act of 
Dec. 7, 1872, bonds of the city for negotiation to the 
amount of five millions of dollars. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REPERKED. 

:W. F. Watson, that the Street Commissioners be 
requested not to lay out a street on the burnt district 
less than fifty feet in width. Referred to the Com- 
mittee on Streets. 

Thomas Gogin, for leave to erect a wooden building 
beyond the limits allowed by law. Referred to the 
Committee on Survey and Ins'pection of Buildings. 

Edward Perkins and others, in regard to assess- 
ments for betterments on Sturgis street. Orderecl to 
be sent up. 

Henry Boyd, for compensation for the blowing up 
of the building No. 49 Water street. ■. Referred to the 
Committee on Claims. ' 

REI'ORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

'Mi-. Bicknell of Ward 4, from the Committee of the 
Common Council on Elections, to whom were referred 
the notifications from George M. Hoblis and II. W. 
Putnam that they contested the right of the persons 
who received certificates of election as members of 
the Common Council from Ward 1.5. to occupy seats 
at this board, and a.sking for a recount of the ballots- 
cast at the last municipal election in said ward, made 
a report that they ha\e carefully recounted the origi- 
nal ballots in the possession of the City Clerk, with 
the following result: 



JANUARY 30, 1873. 



38 



William 0. Tliaclicr luiil 60o 

Krcdcvicic WU-Uvy 53i 

riiTiMiiil Kdw ards 4;)S 

iVHcliacl Kcllc'V 4«-l 

II. W. I'liliiMiii 45:i 

(li'oi-KC M. Ilohlis 4fil 

llciivj \V. l<'iillcr 443 

Hiiaui A . WH^lit 4ia 

Cliarlps 1). Blckford SW 

William (i. Bird 135 

Jmiu'n M('Laughlin, John Kelloy, Patrick Canoll 
and Fuller, one each. 

It appears, therefore, that M^illiani G. Thacher. 
Frederick Bleiler, Pierpont Edwards and Michael 
Kelley, wlio now occispj- scats in theConinnm Cuiin- 
cil, were duly elected. 

The report was accepled. 

Ml'. Williur of ^^'ard 9. from the Joint Standing 
Committee on C'lainis, to whom weie referred the 
petitions of Currier, Trott & Comjiany and many 
others, to be compensated for damages caused by 
the destruction of buildings for tlie jnirpose of ar- 
resting the progress of the fire in this city on the 9th 
of November last, having carefully considered the 
subject, made a report that it api)ears from the opin- 
ion of the City Solicitor (a copy of which is trans- 
mitted herewith) that the city is not legally responsi- 
ble for the damages in any of tlie cases covered by 
the petition. 

The committee would therefore respectfully rec- 
ommend that the petitioners liave leave to withdraw. 

The opinion of the City Solicitor is as follows: 

City Solicitor's Office, I 
■2 Pemberton square, Boston, Jan. -28, 1873. \ 

Sir — Upon the statement of facts made by tlie 
Chief-Engineer, and submitted to me, my opinion is 
that the city of Boston is not legally responsible in 
damages for the buildings w hich were demolished for 
tlie purpose of arresting the progress of the fire on 
tlie (Ith of November last. The liability of munici- 
palities in such cases is created and limited by stat- 
ute, and in order to cast that liability upon them the 
provisions of the statute in regard to the aclion of 
the Engineers in the premises must be complied with. 
In the cases under consideration, it clearly appears 
by the aforesaid statement that those provisions were 
overlooked or not acted upon. This opinion applies 
to cases where the fire did not reach the building de- 
molished as well as to those in which the fire passed 
over the building demolished. 

The city cannot be liable, in my .iudgmeut, for 
damages caused by the explosion of one building to 
other buildings in the neighborhood, when it is not 
liable for the'building destroyed by the explosion. 

In my opinion, the city cannot be holden to pay 
for property destroyed by the fire because the owner 
vi'as prevented by the firemen from removing that 
property to a place of safety, in order that the build- 
ing in which the property was might be blown up.' 
An individual in such cases cannot require that his 
property should be protected by the exposure to de- 
struction of a much larger amount belonging to oth- 
ers. 

When a building is partially destroyed for the pur- 
pose of making facilities to check the fire, the same 
principles must apply as in the case of a total destruc- 
tion of the building; and whether the destrncti(ni be 
total or partial, it must be made in the manner pro- 
vided by the statute, or no liability for the act at- 
taches to the city. 

Very respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 

J. P. Healy. 

Mr. Alderman Qtiincy. 

The report was accepted. 

Mr. Wilbur, from the Joint Standing Committee on 
Claims, to whom was referred the petition of James 
Miillin. to be compensated for jjersonal injuries re- 
ceived from a fall on account of an alleged defect in 
Water street, having heard the petitioner, made a re- 
port that he have leave to withdraw his petition. 
Accepted. 

Mr. Wilbnr, from the same committee, to whom 
was referred the petition of David H. Sampson to be 
compensated for personal injuries received from a 
fall on the Common, made a report recommending 
that the petitioner have leave to withdraw his peti- 
tion. Accepted. 

Mr, Williur, from the same committee, reported 
leave to withdraw on the petion of Ira B. Orcutt. to 
be compensated for personal injuries received fiom a 
fall on account of an alleged defect in School street. 
Accepted. 

Mr. Brennan of Ward 13, from the joint special 
committee ajipointed to nominate a candidate for a 
City Surveyor, made a report, recommending the re- 
election of Thomas W. Davis to the said otlice. 

The report was laid over, under the rule. 



■^ /. ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Mr. Perkins of Ward — 
Ordered, Tliat five members of tlie Common Coun- 
cil, including the President, with such as tlu; Board 
of Aldermen may join, be a joint special committee 
to ha\e charge of ti(c erection of the soldiers' and 
sailors' monument. 

Messrs. Perkins of Ward (i, Darrow of Ward ,jg, 
Denny of Ward 9, and Barnes ()f Ward 11 were ap- 
pointed the committee. ,.i 

Ordered, That the committee appointed under an 
order of the City Council, approved Jan. 2, 1873, to 
report upon the financial, industrial and sanitary^ 
questions concerned in the annexation of certain 
cities and towns to the city of Boston, be authorized 
to procure such clerical, services and such surveys and 
plans as they may require for the prosecution of their 
investigation: the expense to be charged to the appro- 
priation for Incidentals. 

Mr. Perkins, in answer to i^n inquiry, ^tated that, 
in the economy exercised liy the City Council in tfe' 
appointment of ' the committet', they were' embar- 
rassed for want of means in obtaining the services of 
clerks, maps, plans, etc. 
Mr. Perkins ofiered the following orders: - 
Ordered, That the Committee on Public Institu- 
tions be requested to consider and report upon the 
expediency of amending the ordinance in relation to 
the Port Physician, so as to require that he shall per- 
form the duties of physician or assistant-physician 
to the institutions now located at Deer Island. 

Ordered, That the Board of Directors for Public 
Institutions be requested not to proceed in the elec- 
tion of a residi'nt physician for the institutions at 
Deer Island until further action thereon by the City 
Council. 

Mr. Perkins stated, in explanation of the above or- 
ders, that under the former pro\isions in regard to the 
Port Physician, he was always the physician to the 
public institutions on the islands. Imt under the new 
ordinance establishing a Board of Health two physi- 
cians may be appointed unless the City Council other- 
wise provides. If two should be appointed it will be 
difficult to get two such as may be desired to fill both 
places. If combined, a much better physician may 
be had. 

The orders were read once, and were subsequent- 
ly passed, after further explanation. 

Mr. Kelley of Ward 15 ofiered an order to provide 
school rooms for the children heretofore accommo- 
dated in the old Roxbury Almshouse. 

Mr. Plynn of Ward 7 objected that the provisions 
rec[uired were under the directon of the School Com- 
mittee. 

The order was referred to the Committee on Public 
Instruction. 

Mr. Jones of Ward 14 offered an order, which was 
passed, that the Committee on Fire Department con- 
sider and report upon the expediency of the erection 
of anew house for Hook & Ladder Company No. 4. 
On motion of Mr. Page of \^'ard 9 — 
Ordered, That the Committee on Armories and 
Military Alfairs be authorized to repair and furnish 
the armory occupied by Company K, Ninth Regiment 
of Infantry, M. V. M., at the corner of Third and 
Dorchester streets, in South Boston, at an expense 
not exceeding f;i300; said sum to be charged to the 
appropriation for Armories. 

On motion of Mr. Hurt of Ward l(i — 
Ordered, That the salariei^ of the officers and crew- 
of the iron steam tug used for fire purposes shall be 
for the balance of tlie present salary year at the fol- 
lowing rates, viz.: Captain, .'j;:^ 75 per day: engineer, 
f3 75 per day; mate, $3 25 per day; assistant-engin- 
eer, .f 3 25 per day: fireman .f3. deck hand $3, steward 
$3, severally per day— the same to be ciiarged to the 
appropriation for the Fire Department. 

Mr. Burt, in an.swer to inquiries, replied that the 
salaries generally corresponded with the salaries of 
officers of steam fire engines; the only difference be- 
ing that the assistant-engineer and captain get 
twenty-five cents more a day. 

On moti(m of Mr. Bicknellof Ward 4. the Commit- 
tee on Elections were authorized to report in print 
in the cases of petitions against the right of George 
A. Shaw and John W. Mahan to seats in the Council, 
and for the payment of a plionographic report of the 
evidence; the expense to be charged to the appropri- 
ation for Incidentals. 
Mr. Davis of Ward 14 oft'ered the following order: 
Ordered, That the Board of Street Commissioners 
be requested to consider tlie expediency of widening 
Warren street from Moreland to Copeland street, on 
its easterly side. 

On motion of Mr. Perkins of Ward (i, 1lio order was 
referred to the Committee on Streets. 
On mot ion of Mr. Pickering of \\'ard (! — 
Ordered, Thai the President of the Common Couu- 



39 



coMMOisr ootrisrciL. 



cil be authorized to approve bills for expenses in- 
curred by the Common Council, and the standing 
committees of the Common Council not having 
charge of any appropriations of money; also by in- 
dividual members of the Common Council while en- 
gaged in the discharge of official dxity— the amount of 
said bills to be charged to the appropriation for Con- 
tingent Expenses of the Common Council. 

Mr. West of Ward 16 moved a reconsideration of 
the indefinite postponement of the order to divide 
the large committee room by folding doors, giving 
notice that should the motion prevail, he would move 
to lay the order on the table, to await the action in 
the proposed hiring of rooms for the city's use in 
Pemberton square. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 opposed the reconsideration, 
believing the sense of the Council to be opposed to it 
by an almost unanimous vote in the indefinite post- 
ponement. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 6 wished to know what effect 
the action of hiring rooms in Pemberton square 
might have on the proposed division of the committee 
room. 



Mr. West replied that some members of the Council 
have an impression that the division was to be made 
to provide accommodations for the Board of Health, 
which was not the case. The division of the room' 
was necessary for the use of committees. 

Mr. Caton of Ward 11 stated that the proposed 
division was by double folding doors in the centre of 
the room, which would leave but six feet of unopen 
space when folded back, by which two separate 
rooms could bo had, or the two could be thrown into 
one. This was believed to be the proper way to do 
It to provide additional committee rooms. 

Mr. Flynn said it was a fact that the Loan Fund 
Commissioners now occupy a part of this committee 
room, and it would be impossible to get them out 
should the room be divided. Any one who was pres- 
ent at a hearing during the past week would have 
been satisfied that the room was not too large for 
such purposes. 

The motion to reconsider was lost. 

Adjourned. 



4.0 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Board of Alderineu, 

FEBRUARY 3, 1873. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Alder- 
men was held this afternoon, at four o'clock, Alder- 
man Cutter, the Chairman, presiding. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Special Police Officers without pay — Members of the 
Common Council during the present municipal year. 

Benjamin W. Hatch, for duty at Williams Hall, 
corner of Dover and Washington streets, at Templars" 
Hall, No. 280 Washington street, and vicinity. 

Thomas Houghton, for duty on High street, Hart- 
ford street and vicinity; John Graham, for service at 
the Boston Tlieatre; Sidnej' W. Sampson. Henry N. 
Rogers, William B. Tarleton, and Charles H. Meserve 
for duty in the Department of the Board of Health. 

Foreman of Engine Company No. 8 — William 
Childs. 

Police Officers — Bernard Johnson, Oscar M. Well- 
man, Christopher White, William J. Condon, Burt 
Gilson, Thomas Shehun, Harrison Wilder, Jr.. 
George M. Lovcring, Daniel E. Curran, Joseph 
Brown, Harry P. Hersey, Benjamin S. Hill. John U. 
Shaw, Lewis F. Leighton, William Burke, Frederic 
T. Harvey, Harlan P. Paige, Daniel A. Ritter — Ira B. 
Perry. 

Alderman Hulbert wished to know of the Commit- 
tee on Police what they knew of the characters of 
those who were recommended for appointment as 
police otticers. He supposed that the Mayor, in mak- 
ing the appointments, would wish to have the Board 
obtain all the information possible in relation to the 
character of the men appointed on the police. He 
did not think the Mayor should be wholly responsi- 
ble for these appointments. The recommendation of 
prominent citizens was not always infallible. He 
was desirous of knowing from the chairman of the 
Police Committee whether tliese persons were good 
citizens, of good character, and possessed the requi- 
site fitness and ability for the proper discharge of 
their duties. 

Alderman Gibson stated in reply that these men 
were all before the Committee on Police Friday af- 
ternoon, and they obtained all the information in re- 
lation to them which they could, and, as far as they 
tnew, there was nothing against any one of therni. 
He would not object to Taymg the nominations over, 
and it might be that some one would give further in- 
formation who was not so successful. 

The nominations were referred to the Committee 
on Police. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND RErERRED. 

Edward Perkins and others, in regard to the assess- 
ment of betterments on Sturgis street. 

Heirs of Ellen M. Marston, for apportionment of a 
betterment on estate 48 Clifi street. 

Arietta H. Bixby, for apportionment of ClifE-street 
betterments. 

Samuel Hitchcock, for apportionment of Cliff-street 
betterments. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

Gardner Brewer and others, that Federal-street 
grade be raised at the foot of Franklin street. 

Edward Moore, for compensation on account of in- 
jury to his property, 170 Fourth street, by the raising 
of the grade of said street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

M. C. Murray, for compensation for loss of horse 
and sleigh occasioned by a defect in the highway near 
the junction of Prentiss and Tremont streets. 

John H. Roberts, to be paid for money advanced to 
pay for services of band of First Battalion of Cavalry 
at the laying of the corner stone of the United States 
Post Office in 1871. 

Hannah Sullivan, to be paid for injuries received 
by a fall on Athens street. 

Robert Irwin, to be paid for injuries sustained by 
his wife from a defect in Tremont street. 

Philip McDonough, for compensation for injuries 
recmved by his son, Joseph McDonough, by an ex- 
plosion of fireworks at Independence square, July 5, 
1872. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Claims. 

Henry Fall, for license as an auctioneer. Referred 
to Committee on Licenses. 

George S. Howe, for leave to occupy a wooden sta- 
ble for sixteen horses on Hunneman street. 

Thomas Conner, for leave to occupy a wooden sta- 
ble for one horse rear of 20 Cherry street, Ward 16. 



Naylor & Company, for leave to occupy a wooden 
stable for twenty-five horses on Dorchester avenue, 
opposite Norway Iron Works. 

M. N. Brittan, for leave to occupy a wooden stable 
for two horses on Marston avenue. 

Thomas C. Piper, for leave to occupy a wooden 
stable for two horses on West Cottage street. 

James H. Boyhan, for leave to erect a stable for 
two horses oil corner of Tremont and Whitney 
streets. 

Adam Thompson, for leave to occupy and alter a 
stable for thirty horses on Northampton street. 

Severally referred to Committee on Health, on the 
part of this Board. 

Joseph K. and Mary J. Melcher, to be compensated 
for damages caused by her admission to the small- 
pox hospital, she not having that disease. Referred 
to the Committee on Health. 

Trustees of the Prince Library, that the City Libra- 
ry be not opened on Sundays. Read and sent down. 

Winchester & Hight, for leave to erect a wooden 
building beyond the legal dimensions, on Dorchester 
avenue and Third street. Referred to Committee on 
Survey and Inspection of Bnildings. 

Washington Hook ^t Ladder Company No. 4, for a 
new house. Referred to Committee on Fire Depart- 
ment. 

An invitation was received from the Chief -Engineer 
of the Fire Department directed to the Mayor and 
Aldermen, to witness the test of the power of a chem- 
ical fire engine from the New England Fire Extin- 
guisher Company, on Wednesday, Feb. ^>, at 2 P. M., 
in the square back of the City Hall, four of which en- 
gines are in use in Chicago, and fourteen additional 
ones have been ordered. 

The invitation was accepted. 

QUARTERLY REPORT OF CITY REGISTRAR. 

The City Registrar reported that during the quar- 
ter ending Jan. .31, he has received for certificates of 
intentions of marriage $t\1S 50, which sum has been 
paid into the City Treasury. 

Ordered to be sent down. 

QtJARTERLY REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF MARKET. 

The quarterly report of the Superintendent of Fan- 
ueil-Hall Market, gives the receipts, as follows: 

Received for rent of stalls, $10,396 50 

cellars, 5,385 00 

" permanent outside stands, 723 75 

■' weighing at market scales, 192 22 

" rent of stalls in new market, 3,030 00 

cellars " " 1,462 50 

21 189 97 
All of which was paid to the City Treasurer. 
Ordered to be placed on file. 

QUARTERLY REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

The quarterly report of the Overseers of the Poor 
^ives the receipts and expenditures for the quarter as 
follows: 
Receipts — 

Cash on hand Nov. 1, 1872 $1,735 81 

Drafts on Treasurer and requisitions for Tempo- 
rary Home 24,750 63 

Cash from cities and towns 3,275 97 

" " occupants of Charity Building, for 

heating 370 16 

Cash from State of Massachusetts for relief of 

State paupers 887 04 

Cash for burials 27 00 

$29,260 80 
The expenditures were as follows: 

Paid for burials $1,563 87 

" cities and towns for relief of Boston poor. . 518 03 

" expenses Temporary Home 1,750 63 

" pensions and grants at office 4,413 88 

" immediate relief of person having no set- 
tlement 83 00 

" coal and wood 2,213 63 

•' groceries 3,609 00 

" salary of Secretary 550 00 

•' " of Bookkeeper 424 99 

of Clerk 175 00 

of Visitors 900 00 

" office expenses 3-14 81 

■' transportation 12 75 

" charity building, expenses, salaries, fuel, 

etc 1,862 05 

$18,361 64 
" from State 837 04 

Cash balance January 1 $11,797 98 

Ordered to be sent do^^^l. 

REPORT OF COMMISSIONER ON CAMBRIDGE BRIDGE. 

The second report of F. W. Lincoln, Commissioner 
on Bridges between Boston and Cambridge, was laid 
before the Board, in print. 

The report refers to the completion of repairs on 
the West Boston Bridge, among the more important 



FEBRXT ARY 



1873. 



4.1 



of wliich "new gates of an improved pulteni lia\i' 
l)een biiill, for tlHt; bridge by Messrs. Ross & Lord, 
duriiii;- the past year, and tlic old draw has been re- 
paired siitlicieiuly to keep it in rnnniny order. It 
needs new Iraek frames and other repairs, tlie mak- 
ing of which have been postponed until the winter 
months to avoid interrupting tlie travel over the 
bridge. 

The wooden pavement laid on the pile portion of 
the bridge has worn as well as was expected. Some 
ditiiculty was experienced with the \\'arren ])avement 
for a sluirt tinu', the heavy rains displacing it, bnl 
since this defect was obviated it has stood well. It is. 
howevi^r, the opinion of the commissioners that a 
wooden pavement is unsuitable forbnd2;es bniltafter 
the style of those under their charge for reasons given 
l)y them, and they say it is their intention, in making 
tlu' pro])osed imiirovements on Canal Bridge, to pave 
the roadway with small granite blocks, as being the 
best pavement undei' all circumstances for the pur- 
pose. 

In accordance with requests, and on an examina- 
tion of tlie sub.iect, the Commissioners believe that 
the ap)>licationof steam power would be the most etii- 
cient and economical method of moving tlie draws. An 
estimate of cost of a double-cylinder engine of eight- 
horse power, with the necessary shafting and gear- 
ing, was obtained shortly after the receipt of this 
petition. The estimate, including the cost of an en- 
gine house and coal shed, was about $4.'50(). and at 
thai time it was not thought advisable to incur so 
large an expense in connection with the old draw. 
The Commissioners are obliged, by an act of the 
Legislature, to make the draw openings in this bridge 
thirty-six feet wide, instead of the present width of 
thirty feet; to span these openings a new draw twel\-e 
feet longer than the present one will have to be con- 
structed, and although we liave not thought it neces- 
sary to comply with the requirements of this act un- 
til the draw ways of Warren Bridge and the several 
railroad bridges between Warren and Canal bridges 
W(^re widened, the action of the railroad corporations 
and the Commissioners on the Cliarlestown Bridges 
during the past year in widening the openings in their 
bridges leaves no excuse for further delay. 

Witli a new draw of improved construction the use 
of steam might not be required; but additional diffi- 
culties are found in the width of water way, as af- 
fecttng the ebb and tiow of the tide, and the conse- 
quent necessity of warping vessels through the draw 
way without much aid from the current. It is de- 
signed to make the proposed repairs on the old draw, 
and the machinery which will be used ou it during 
the reconstruction of the Canal Bridge may be used, 
if required, on the new one. The cost of the im- 
provements thus far on tliis bridge, under the direc- 
tion of the Commissioners, is $5G,746 4(i. 

The reconstruction of Canal or Craigie's Bridge, 
has been delayed for the same reason as given in me 
case of the other bridge, and it is important for the 
Lov\'ell Railroad Corporation to cooperate with the 
Commissioners in making the alterations, which 
eoiiperation it is believed will be consented to. Tlie 
new draw, by direction of the Harbor Ccmimission. 
will have to be placed one hundred and sixty feet 
nearer the Cambridge end of the bridge; and tlie 
position of the railroad draw altered to make the 
draw openings come on the same line. The old 
draw way on Canal Bridge is to be covered with a 
new superstructure, and when this is done, vessels, 
instead of being in line to go through the new draw 
way after passing through the railroad bridge, will be 
compelled to make two changes in direction in a con- 
tracted channel to accomplish this ob.1ect. 

The plans which have been adopted for the recon- 
struction contemplate widening Hie present structure 
to sixty-four feet., a new draw fifty feet in width, with 
piers and openings in the jiosition fixed by the Har- 
bor C(mimission. a renu)val of the bulkheads and 
fences, the driving of additional piles in the old 
bridge iiiers where the superstructure is raised, sev- 
eral new piers between the present ones which have 
.settled, and repaving the roadway with small granite 
blocks. " , 

The width of sixty-fonr feet, wliich has been de- 
cided upon, will I'uable us to use such piles in the 
present fender guard as may be suitable, at much 
less exjiense than would be required if a greater width 
were adopted. The sidewalks will be ten feet wide, 
leasing forty-four feet for the roadway, which is 
ample for two hoise-railroad tracks and three lines of 
teams. 

The Street Commissi(niers of Boston were inform- 
ally consulted before we deeidi-d upmi this width. 
Their opinion was that sixty feet would be the grc d- 
est wiHlli it would l)e expedient to adojit for Leverett 
.street, if widened, although no objection would prob- 
ably be made to widening the street to sixty-four 
feet from the bridge to North Charles street. The 



plans upon which the estimate of last year was based 
contemplated widening the bridge to seventy-five 
feet to correspond to the width of Bridge street in 
Cambi'idge; bul the Commissioners do not feel au- 
lliorized to incur the expense of making it this width 
since their consultation with the Street Commission- 
ers. 

In deciding to make the draw fifty feet wide, in- 
stead of thel'ull width of the bridge, they have been 
influenced by investigations of the various bridges 
over tide water belonging to the City of Boston. 

The engineer's estimate of the cost of improve- 
ments on this bridge is .fKiO.OttO, and as soon as the 
l)lans have recei\-ed the approval of the Harbor Com- 
mission we shall advertise for proposals for doin^ the 
work. To avoid delay, the contractor should na\'e 
two months time previous to beginning work under 
his contract to procure suitable timber, much of it 
being of sizes not easily obtained unless sawed to 
oi'der. The bridge will liave to be closed to team 
travel for a i)eriod of three or four mouths. 

Only such repairs as were necessary for safety have 
b(^en made upon this bridge during the past season. 
Tlie draw liroke down eaiTy in the spring. An exam- 
ination of the timbers showed them to be so much 
decayed as to lie in a dangerous condition. The 
bridge was at once closed to the passage of teams 
and the draw thoroughly reconstructed, the foot 
travel being accomnKuiated by a small swing liridge. 

The draw of the Wi'st lioston Bridge was opencfl 
during the last year KiilT times, and that of the Crai- 
gie's Bridge 4.580. The general expenses to this city for 
maintaining these bildges amounted to $(i8() 20, "ig.^OO 
of wliich was for salary of Commissioner; expenses 
of West Boston Bridge, $4741 .50, of which $6:10 was 
for salary of Superintendent and .$:B925 23 for repairs; 
Canal Bridge, |;1!I05 23, of which .$630 was for salary 
of Superintendent and $1105 73 for re airs; making a 
total expense of $7333 08." 

Ordered to lie sent down. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OP NOTICE. 

The several hearings on orders of notice on peti- 
tions of R. B. Lincoln & Son. for leave to erect and 
use a steam engine and boiler on Alger street, near 
Dorchester street; of McCready & Stearns, for leave 
to erect and use a steam engine and boiler at 89 Court 
street; Schnetzen & Abendroth, for leave to locate 
and use a steam boiler and engine at 11 Charlestown 
street; Carew & Walsh, for leave to erect a steam en- 
gine and boiler on wharf on East Dover street; Den- 
ifiison & Co., for leave to locate and use a steam en- 
gine and boiler at 15 Suffolk place; Williams & Ev- 
erett, to locate a steam engine and boiler at the cor- 
ner of Bedford and VVashingtf u streets,were taken up. 

No person apjieared in either case, and the reports 
were recommitted. 

The hearing on order of notice on petition 
of JVIanuel Silva against the Old Colony Rail- 
road Company for an estimate of grade damages, was 
taken up, when Alderman Power presented a report 
as follows: 

On petition of Manuel Silva of this city. pra}'ing 
this Board to estimate the damage caused to his es- 
tate on Dorchester avenue by the location and con- 
struction of the tracks of the Old t^olony & Newport 
Railroad in rear of said land, as in said petition is more 
fully set forth, and it appearing that said Old Clolony 
& Newport Railroad Company has been duly notified 
of the pendency of ,«aid ])etition, it is now hereby ad- 
.indged and estimated by this Board, that the damages 
occasioned to the petitioner's land by the location 
and construction of the tracks of the'Old Colony & 
Newport Railroad ad.iacent to and in rear of said land, 
and by the alteration of the grade of Dorchester ave- 
nue at that point, in consequence thereof, amounts to 
the sum of one dollar. 

Alderman Power stated, in explanation, that it 
might appear singular such a report was made, but it 
was understood the parties conld not agree, and it 
would be a subject of litigation. The committee 
therefore reported in favor of nominal damages. 

The report was accepted. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were severally read a second 
time and passed: 

Order to pay heirs of Charles O. Rogers $8034, for 
land taken on Summer street. 

Order to pay the heirs of Thomas Tileston $15,043. 
for land taken on Purchase street. 

Order to pay heirs of Mary Tileston $:6720, for land 
taken on Purchase street. 

The report and order to hire the Missionary Build- 
ing in Pemberton square, at an annual rent of .$7000, 
for city purposes, were laid on the table. 

PUBLIC EXl'ENniTURES FOR REFRESHMENTS. 

The following order, offered by Alderman llulbert. 
was considerccf: 



4r2 



BOARD OF ALDEE.lVCElSr 



Ordered, That there be paid to each Alderman 

dollars, and to each member of the Common Council 

dollars, semi-annually, to cover such expenses; 

and that no amount shall be paid from the City Treas- 
ury for refreshments or meals, beyond the sums 
hereby appropriated, either by committees or individ- 
ual members of either branch of tlie City Council. 

Alderman Hulbert said it might appear to be a trivial 
matter, but it was not from a want of respect to the 
members of the City Government that he offered the 
order. The history of the past showed that in more 
or less of its features it was something not new as a 
subject for public consideration. As a new City 
Government it was a matter worthy of their atten- 
tion. In the first place, the whole expense of the 
Government for refreshments, whether much or 
little, none of it is legally chargeable upon the city. 
No committee or member of the City Council has a 
right to spend one dollar for such purposes, and 
standing upon its legality, that is the end of it. 

In conversation with some one on the subject, the 
question was raised as to the ground of opposition 
which would be made to the order, and whether the 
legal question would be raised. He hoped the 
legal question would be raised. In the form of the 
order, he had given it m such a manner where no 
objection could be raised, as confined to expense of 
meals, and not including carriage hire, recognizing 
the reasonableness of that class of expenses. 

Alderman Hulbert urged as his object in offering 
the order to put the city beyond scandal in the mat- 
ter of furnisliing refreshments, believing that the 
city would accord what was proper and right when 
members of the Government were put to the neces- 
sity of obtaining refreshments, but beyond that when 
they go further it should be known on what gronnd 
it is called for. It had been a custom in past times 
w'hen committees and members of the City Council 
had been very busy to make expenditures bcj'ond 
what is proper and reasonable. 

The duties of members of the City Government, 
with reference to the public, entitle them to the re- 
spect and confidence of the community, but if not 
entitled to it they deserve its contempt. They might 
make mistakes, but should fake care and not deserve 
contempt. In view of the interests of the city he 
stood appalled at the great expense which is required. 
The citizens may have opinicms and urge certain ac- 
tions, but they were called upon to take the responsi- 
bility and to decide upon those questions. Their ac- 
tion might be called in question, and while citizens 
might oppose him in his action he did not w'ant to be 
disgraced. They might hate him for his course, but 
he did not wish to be despised. 

In further urging this point for consideration, the 
Alderman said he wished the sustaining power of the 
public around them, and not ha\'e it said that they 
sold their manliness for a mess of pottage. The 
chairmen of committees wore often embarrassed, as 
he learned, speaking from hearsay, as matters now 
stood. A committee would hold a meeting from two 
to three o'clock, and adjourn to some hotel, where 
they did not eat a dinner as merchants and others 
did, at a moderate expense, but in some upper room, 
where the expense would be from three to six times 
what merchants, lawyers and business meu would 
expend for a dinner. 

Every day there were these expenditures for din- 
ners, but should a fixed sum be allowed, there it 
would end. and the committees would know it, and 
the chairmen would not be embarrassed. In this 
way the actual expenses would be amply met, and 
further than that they onght not to go. He could see 
no reason why they should do more than this, while 
in doing so they showed themselves not worthy of 
the respect of "the public, and lowered themselves in 
self-esteem. In taking the city's fund for purposes 
like that, the members of a Government in another 
city had been demoralized, and the villain of the age, 
as he might be called, laughs at the judge, the court 
and the Jury. 

In behalf of every member of the City Council, of 
their families, of the reputation of the city, and of 
the young men of the city, he entreated that the prac- 
tices he had spoken of be done away with. Under 
the oaths he had taken, he could not sanction such 
expenditures, and he wished the present City Council 
to have the respect of the public, and be careful in all 
the movements they make. If any gentleman should 
tell him that his proposition was not fair, he failed to 
see it. 

Alderman Power said he had no doubt there had 
been abuses, in past years, in expenditures, and he 
hoped a better method would be devised to prevent 
such abuses. He hoped the order would be referred 
to the Committee on Ordinances! 

Alderman Clark said he was happy to hear the re- 
marks of the Alderman, and to inform him that, in 



the matter of the expenditures complained of, the 
City Government had been improved. The expendi- 
tures of the kind, last year, had been reduced by a 
large per cent. It woiild be almost impossible to 
regulate expenses of that kind to satisfy every one, 
but he objected to the order rf the Alderman as 
strictlv illegal, as they had no right to vote a salary, 
whether of $6 or #,500. 

It was his belief that public sentiment would regu- 
late the matter, and the Alderman would see at the 
end of the month the effect so much desired by the 
Alderman and every member of the City Government. 
He had an order which he would offer, by which that 
public sentiment would have an influence in the mat- 
ter. . 

Alderman Powei' withdrew his motion to refer, 
when Alderman Clark offered the following order: 

Ordered, That the Auditor of Accounts be directed 
to submit to the City Council a monthly statement, 
in detail, of the expenditures on account of refresh- 
ments furnished to the several standing or special 
committees of the City Council, or of either branch 
during the preceding month, designating the appro- 
priation to which said expenditures are chargeable, 
and the names of the persons who have contracted 
the same (.said report to commence with the February 
draft). 

Alderman Q.iiincy sympatWzedi heartily in the pur- 
pose for which the order was offered, and hoped that 
in some form its object would be obtained. "VVhile 
he did not himself perceive on what ground the City 
Government sliould be held an exeeption to the rule 
that the lalxu-er is worthy of his hire, yet the fact that it 
was so held could not render abuses of this sort dig- 
nified, decent or honest. It was not so much the amount 
paid, although gentlemen did not seem to have realized 
that they were spending out of the pocket of the poor 
taxpayer, as well as that of the rich; but the demor- 
alizing effect on the character of the men who prac- 
tised or permitted the abuse which was most to be 
deprecated. 

To illustrate, what could be more natural than 
reasoning, thus: "Such a committee are spending 
their hundreds for champagne and cigars. I don't 
want bacchanalian suppers, but I should like a Brus- 
sels car|)ct and new mirrors, which wont cost half 
what others spend in drink and smoke, if I 
could only see how to make the city foot 
the bill." And in this frame of mind it soon 
occurs r,o him to take a hint frcmi the parable 
of the unjust steward, and he goes to a man to 
whom tlie city owes forty, and tells him to talvc his 
bill and sit down quieklj' and write fifty. That was 
the way it had been done in New York and might be 
here. Next would come thousand-dollar safes for 
private counting rooms, and in view of the compound 
ratio in which such evils increase, how long would it 
be before members of the City Government might be 
filling their pockets with as brazen fo'-eheads as that 
of the Napoleonic swindler who has just escaped the 
punishment of his crimes in New York. It was just 
these little abuses which, if unchecked, acquired' the 
impetus of an avalanche, and swept cities into just 
such an abyss of corruption as that out of which New- 
York was so bravely struggling to arise. Let tliose to 
whom the good name of our city waj* dear join hands 
in an attempt to check this abnse at once; if unsuc- 
cessful, at least their skirts would be clear, and the 
responsibility to the public would rest on the shoul- 
ders on which it belonged. 

Alderman Clark said the question of paying sala- 
nes could not be entertained for a moment. His or- 
der, if adopted, would be all that was desirable in 
preventing abuses, and he was sorry that such an ar- 
gument was made use of by the Alderman, for the 
\\ays suggested by him would never have been 
thought of. He had no fears, however, of this Gow 
ernment's following the ways of New York to any 
great extent; they might be on the road in their junk- 
etings to extravagance, but not to that extent which 
prevailed in New Y'ork. He should be son-y to have 
the City Council go to the Legislature for authority 
to pay salaries; for if they did, it would be expected 
they \uould pay from $m)Q to $.5000 to Aldermen and 
half as much to the Council. It would be strictly 
illegal to pay money without getting authority of the 
Legislature, and he hoped liis or a similar order 
would be adopted at once and not referred to any 
committee. 

Alderman Sayward said he was loth to say anything 
on this subject, but as he had been in the City Gov- 
ernment for three years, he must allude to tlie past 
Cit,v Governments. In the discharge of his duties 
during that time, he had done so to the best of his 
ability, and if he had lost his self-respect, he thought 
the people would not have sent him here again. 
There had been enough said already to disgrace them- 
selves and he would move an indefinite" postpone- 
ment of the order. 



FEBRUARY 3, 1873 



4t3 



Aldoniuiii ITulheii said thai Alderman Clark liad 
hil tlu' nail on the head. Before actinji In t.liis mattei' 
he had taken the advice of the City Solicitor in re- 
oa>'d to the legality of payment for refreshments. 
an<l (here was no rit;ht in either case; l>ut tlie eonrse 
pioposed liy liini wimld be definite and manly, and 
they could go aliuut their business feeling that it was 
so. They should be reasonable here as in any other 
business, expending only as much as might be nec- 
essary, while the practice had been to procure din- 
n'TS at charges high and exorbitant. This he liad had 
f 1 om men of experience in this hall. In strict legali- 
ty they had no right to expend a dollar; but he would 
allow tlu' expen(liture of a definite, lixed sum, for 
any other course was demoralizing. With such a 
liniit lixed, every member would feel better that it is 
so. What is wanted is to have confidence and to feel 
that they are entitled to the public confidence. 

Alderman Stebbins said he should vote for the 
order, but suggested the addition to include the re- 
port of the February draft, which amendment Alder- 
)aan Clark accepted as a part of the order. 

Alderman (ratheld said this was his fifth year in the 
< 'ity (Government, and he was glad Ihe Alderman had 
introdu<'ed the subje<i, which hiid been a scandal for 
years. They were sent thereto conduct thy business 
of the Oovernment in an economical manner, and in 
accepting otliee they knew that they were to \ia\e no 
compensation, and it would be a small sacrifice if it 
Was not so. The people expect some one to accept 
oliice under such conditions, antl if worthy men do 
not, those who are not worthy will, while others slay 
in their counting rooms writing invectives against 
the manner of doing I he luildic business. 

Alderman Gatlield hoped the Aldermen would never 
be paid as they were in New York, and it was their 
duty to stand and stop the chinks through which 
leaks are made from the public treasury. As some- 
thing had been said about the expenses beino- less 
than they used to be, and as he was in this Board 
nine years ago, it was but right that he should make 
a defence of himself. He had examined the Auditor's 
report, and would give some comparisons between 
the year lH(j:i and the last year. 

In' 18fi5 the expenditures" on armories were f 15,Tttl, 
and expenses of committee ^139 95; last j'ear, ex- 
penditures .1|;18.244 44, and of committee $810 10. Bells 
and clocks in 1865, expendititres $1224 .30, and of 
committee nothing; last year, expenditures |;287ti 19 
and of committee .•J;135 .55. Boston Harbor in 18t>5, 
$11,640 expenditures, $147 30 for committee; last 
year $.5371 54 expenditures, and of committee il!772 90. 
t'ire alarms in 18(i5. ,$17,070 expenditures, and of com- 
mittee $577 46 ; last year, .$42,763, and of committee 
$1277 21. Health Department in 1865. $187,711 for 
external department, and $292 for committee; last 
year $3j8,7!I8 06 for both departments, and for com- 
mittee f6r>4 40. Fire Department in 1865, $134,847 
expenditures, and .$721 40 for committee; last year 
$399 249, and for committee $2,591 22, .Streets in 18(i5 
$134,844 expenditures, and $78 95 for committee; last 
year $169,064 expenditures, and $1290 for committee. 

One reason for the decreased expense of commit- 
tees in the years 1864-1866 was the adoption of an 
order that there should be no expenditure for intoxi- 
cating liquors. This was adhered to, except in some 
cases in which gentlemen from abroad were present, 
and it was thought necessary to have liquors. It 
would be seen that there was quite a difference be- 
tween the year 1865 and the past year. Yet it was 
true the expenditures last year were le.' s than in sev- 
eral previous years, and the expenditures had been 
going on in a descending scale. Last year the de- 
crease had been at a greater rate, and this year he 
hoped it would be more so. He was not in favor 
however, of the order of Alderman Hulbert, but pre- 
ferred that of Alderman Clark. 

He believed it would be disgraceful to pass the or- 
der of Alderman Hulbert. for'it should be left to the 
honor, integrity and good sense of the chairmen of 
committees^'of the City Council, They were told that 
gentlemen sometimes dined at the e.xpense of the city 
without asking the consent of the Chairman of the 
Board. There are times when it is necessary to take 
some refreshment while in the discharge of duties on 
committ'ee. Although not legal, he did so, and he 
was not ashamed of it. On Thursday evening last, the 
Committee on Accounts were .-engaged in the exami- 
nation of millions of dollars in bills, and it was neces- 
sary to go through with it to bring It before the Com- 
mon Council. There were cases of real necessity, 
and no man of commtm sense would objecl to their 
taking of refreshments in such cases. 

Such expenditures should be made with reasonable 
limits, and not as in some cases, where the bills were 
so large that the chairman w.is ashamed of it and foot- 
ed the bill himself. He could see no reason in a com- 
mittee's coming together to nominate a City Messen- 
ger and expending $40 in doing so. One reasoii for 



an increase of th-e expenditures of the Committee on 
Streets was in the increase of the committee from 
three lo eight, and Ihere was a proposition before the 
Legislature lo make the Committee on Sewers a 
joint committee. He hoped they would act this J'ear 
lo Ihe satisfaction of lliose who put them there, with- 
oiil hope or fear as to their reelection, but in such a 
manner as to merit the gratitude of their fellow cit- 
izens. 

Alderman ('lark said he was happy to hear they 
were ini the road to progress. The Alderman in his 
comparisons had gone back to when the city was a 
country village. He trusted the Board would do their 
duty, regardless of the question of reelection, and 
that no member would be frightened, whether he 
was in office (nie or five years. Honestly and fear- 
lessly they should do their duty, and he was willing 
not to partake of a particle of anything at the city 
expense, and would sign an agreement to that efl'ect. 
The public would not object to the cost of refresh- 
ments if conscientiously done as they would do in 
their own l)nsiness. In regard to the expense of 
Committees on Armories and oh Fire Department, 
the late fire had doubled the labors on both. So it 
was also in regard to the Committee on Streets. 

In relation to the refreshments to the Committee 
on Accounts, referred to, if any objection was made, 
he would pay his proportion. On Friday last, he 
w ent without anything to eat from seven o'clock in 
the morning to six o'clock in the evening, when four 
of a committee had a dinner at an expense of $2 80. If 
all members of committees would dine in that pro- 
portion, no one would object, and it could be done. 
The chairman of a committee was responsible, and if 
the Auditor should bring the names before the public 
once a month, it would be the safest check against 
the spending of money. 

Alderman Sayward said he supposed he was asso- 
ciated with a body of gentlemen, but it appeared the 
charges of extravagance wore aimed at the Common 
Council, and not upon this Boord. It may be that 
the members of the other branch ars as dignified as 
those of this Board. He did not come to this Board 
for dinners, and believed it was but boy's play to 
talk about bread and cheese. He hoped, therefore, 
that the order for indefinite postponement would pre- 
■^ail. 

Alderman (^uincy said that althoitgh at first he was 
in favor of the order of Alderman Hulbert, he was 
now in favor of that of Alderman Clark, in view of 
the legal objections. 'With regard to the objectiona- 
ble supposition complained of, made by him, he did 
not think it would ever ha;-pen, hut in view of the 
figures which had been given, he would join in an at- 
tempt now to remedy the abuses complained of. 

Alderman Gafheld said he did not intend to injure 
the feelings of any one, in giving the figures which 
he had. 

The question was taken and the motion to indea- 
nitely postpone was declared to be lost. 

Alderman Sayward asked for the yeas and nays, 
but the Chair declared it to be too late. 

Alderman Hulbert wished to have the question 
taken on his order, and not on that of the order of 
Alderman Clark as an amendment to his. 

Alderman Clark moved his order as a substitute for 
the original order. 

Alderman Sayward objected to the substitute, that 
if committees were instituted as they were last year, 
there were those who talked the most who were the 
mo?t ready to eat. 

Alderman Hulbert was convinced that his order 
would put the question on the best foundation, in a 
manly, fair and siraiglil manner, by which Ihe trouble 
would be ended, By going straight, they would save 
thousands of dollars to the city. He would plead for 
manliness, and for expenditures, just as merchants 
would do in their own business. 

Alderman Clark hoped for the passage of his order, 
foi he did not believe we should go in the wicked 
w ays of New York. He believed hi the good sense of 
the people, that they would not allow the City Gov- 
ernment to become corrujif. As a matter of "econo- 
my, he objected lo paying salaries, or anything like 
salaries. If salaries were to be paid, thev would not 
be less than $.5000 to $10,000, at least, if "the abilities 
of the Alderman were to he taken into account. He 
should not want less than $5000 1 o be paid for services 
according to the labor jierformed. As .$.5000 it would 
give $60,000 for the Board of Aldermen, and at $1000 
for the members of Ihe Council, it would cost $64 ,- 
000. As an economical measure, it would be best to 
let it drop, and rest themselves (m their manhood 
and integrity. 

Alderman Sayward said he was glatl the Alderman 
had gol back to manhood on the questitni. and he 
h6ped that the order would l»e withdrawn. 

Aldermair Brown moved that the order be laid 
over. 



44 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



Alderman Clark thought it would not be well to 
postpone the taking of the question, when they were 
so well prepared to act upon it. 

Alderman Brown said his reason for making the 
motion was on account of so many opinions being 
expressed, but he would withdraw the motion. 

Alderman Power hoped the order would be laid 
over, for it was very important, and to pass it in too 
much haste it would do more injury than good. The 
matter was all in the hands of gentlemen of the City 
Council, who could remedy it. The members of the 
Common Council could not enter info extravagant 
feasts at the expense of the city if the Aldermen said 
no, for it was in their hands and they governed it. 
He was not ashamed to take a dinner at the expense 
of the city when necessary, but hoped the order 
would be laid over, and some plan be devised by 
which to remedy the evil of extravagance complained 
of. 

Alderman Clark hoped the order would not go over, 
for they had devoted the entire evening to its discus- 
sion, and there could be no hann in its adoption. Tt 
\vas a matter between the public and themselves. 

Alderman Gaflield said they were all agreed on one 
thing— of falling back on their own manhood. On 
coming to the City Council he felt as Alderman Hul- 
bert did. but he had come to believe that the public 
would justify the expenditure for refreshments to a 
proper amount. 

Alderman Quincy said it was true they had the 
matter in their own hands, birt it was very pleasant 
to have public opinion come to their assistance, lie 
would, however, favor the measure of reform any 
way. 

The question was taken on the substitute of Alder- 
man Clark, which was carried, by a vote of 11 to 1, as 
follows: 

Yeas — Bigelow, Brown, Clark, Cutter. Emery, f-Jaf- 
field, Gibson, Hulbert, Power, Quincy, Stebbins. 

Nay— Sayward. 



PAPEKS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

The petitions of Henry Boyd, Thomas Gogin and 
William P. Watson were severally referred,'in con- 
currence. 

The following reports were accepted, in concur- 
rence: 

Report (leave to withdraw) on petition of Ira B. 
Orcutt, to be paid for personal injuries received in 
School street. 

Report (leave to withdraw) on petition of David H. 
Sampson, to be paid for personal mjuries received on 
the Common. 

; Report (leave to withdraw) on petition of James 
Mullin, to be paid for personal injuries received in 
Water street. 

The order to request the Street Commissioners to 
widen Warren sireet, from Morelaiid to Copeland 
street, was referred to the Committee on Streets, in- 
concurrence. 

The order for appointment of a joint special com- 
mittee on the subject of the Soldiers' Monument was 
passed, in concurrence, and Aldermen Clark, Quincy 
and Power were joined to the committee. 

The following orders were passed, in concurrence: 

Order to establish salaries for oiKcers and crew of 
the steam fire l)oat "William M. Flanders." 

Order to furnish armory of Company K, Ninth 
Regiment, at a cost of $iiOb. 

Order for (Committee on Fire Department to con- 
sider the subject of a new house for Hook and Lad- 
der Company No. 4. 

Order to charge to appropriation for Incidentals 
the expense of printing the Ward 5 contested election 
case. 

Order to provide school accommodations for ehil- 
dren removed from Old Roxbury Almshouse. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Public Instruction. 

Order for purchate of horses and supplies for the 
use of the Fire Department during this municipal 
year. 

Order for Chief-Engineer to cause all necessary re- 
pairs to be made on the several engines, hose and 
hook and laddder carriages during the present munici- 
pal year. 

Order to pay the Atlantic Works $4646 69, for ma- 
terials furnished to the steam fire boat. 

Report and order authorizing to be issued to the 
commissioners appointed in conformity to the legis- 
lative act of December 7. 18T2, bonds of the city for 
negotiation to the amount of five millions of dollars. 

Order to cause the skylights of the entry in the 
City Hall to lie arranged so as' to be opened when re- 
quired. 

Order for the Annexation Commissioners to pro- 
cure plans and clerk hire which may be required by 
them. 



ADDITIONAL APPROPKIATrON FOR THE CITY HOSPITAL. 

A request was received from the Trustees of the 
City Hospital, for an additional appropriation, as fol- 
lows: 

Gentlemen — The Trustees of the City Hospital have 
to inform you that the probable expenditures of this 
institution will exceed the appropriations made for 
the current year by the sum of about eleven thousand 
five hundred dollars, and we respectfully ask you for 
a further appropriation of that amount. " 

This deficiency is caused chiefly by the expendit- 
ures for the maintenance of the Smallpox Hospital on 
Albany street, amounting to $10,352 38, which were 
not contemplated when the original appropriations 
were asked for. 

Respectfally submitted. 

B. C. Drew. Presideul. 

Referred to Committee on Finance. 

ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATION FOR PRINTING. 

Aldeiman Power, from the Committee on Printing, 
made a request for an additional appropriation of 
five thousand dollars, for the estimated expenses of 
the remainder of the financial year chargeable to the 
general printing account. The committee present 
the following statement from the Superintendent of 
Printing: 

To the Committee on Printing — I have been noti- 
fied by the Auditor of Accounts that the balance of 
the General Printing appropriation will be reduced to 
$:i71 .51 . after payment of the February draft, requir- 
ing an additional appropriation for the two subse- 
quent monthly payments. 

Tlie appropriation for the current year «-as $:^0.000. 
being $.5000 less than the preceding year. The ex- 
penditures from this apjiropriatiou have been as fol- 
lows, according to a statement from the Auditor's 
otlice: 

Printine, etc., by ( ity Printers .$12,163 19 

Printing- stock ;?,4'75 87 

Stationery 2,9T0 30 

City Bonds 4,390 00 

Transcript reports, Oity (;ouncil 3,863 18 

Salary Superintendent 'of Printing 2,083 33 

Directories :iOO 00 

Military passes to Burnt District 88 47 

Advcrtisiiiff 11 75 

Otlier expenses 282 40 

$29,628 49 
Balance :^71 r.l 

Approprialion $:W,000 00 

This appropriation supplies printing and stationery 
for the City Council, City Clerk, Assessors, Treasurer, 
Auditor, Solicitor, and offices having no other appro- 
priation; also the Transcript reports, city bonds, etc. 

The present a])propriation would probably have 
sufficed, but for the unusually heavy expenditure for 
citv bonds, amounting to $4;i90, the preceding year 
being $i!)(). 

There has been a general increase in the amount of 
work for this account, partly indicated by the in- 
creased number of public documents, being one hun- 
dred and thirty-four for 1872, and but one hundred 
and four for 1871. These documents, including the 
several department reports, are charged to this ac- 
count, excepting only surplus copies over the usual 
document edition, that may be required by the de- 
partments. 

The general printing account, also, carries a consid- 
erable amount of stock for the several departments, 
from its date of purchase to its date of charging to 
the several department appropriations. The monthly 
balances of stock on hand vary from $1000 to .f200(); 
the amount Jan. 1, 187.3. being $]1()4. 

It is estimated that the amount required for the re- 
mainder of the financial year will be $.5000, for print- 
ing, stock, stationery, reports of City Council, salary, 
and other expenses. George Coolidge, 

Superintendent of Printing. 

Referred to the Committee on Finance. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Sayward, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of licenses as follows: John 
B. O'Brien, to give a concert at Tremont Temple 
Feb. 6, 1873; James A. Healey, to hold a fair at St. 
James Theatre for two weeks from Feb. 4; also, 
licenses to sundry persons as pawnbrokers, vict- 
uallers, wagon licenses and for transfer of wagoii 
license, carriage stand. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Sayward. from the Committee on Health, 
reported in favor of stables as follows: Charles 
Newhall. to occtijiy a wooden stable for five horses 
on Wales street, near Harvard street; A. F. Poole, to 
occupy a wooden stable for one horse on Humplireys 
.street; Joseph R. Gross, to occupy a wooden stable 
for two horses rear 564 Dorchester avenue; Jolm Mc- 
Cauliff, to occupy a wooden stable for one horse on 
Haight, corner of Centre place; A. A. Hall, to oecu- 



F E B R TT A R Y 



1873 



^5 



py li wooden stable for eight horses on Castle slreel ; 
W. 'P. Pdi'ter, to oceiipy a wooden stable for one 
horse on Woodward avenue; S. F. Marks & Son, to 
oc(Mipy a wooden stable for four horses on Blue Hill 
avenne; Jeremiah Twooney, to build a brick stahU' 
for one horse af-iil Second street. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Gibson, from the Committee on Police, 
made a report recommending the approval and con- 
firmation of the nomination of David W. Herrick as 
Si'rgeant of Police. Accepted. 

The same committee reported in fiivor of tlie con- 
firmation of the nomination of Jacob T. Beers as si 
Truant Officer, Accepted. 

Alderman Cutter, from the Committee on Pavin", 
reported leave to withdraw on the petition of Eli 
Fernald for leave to occupy a portion of Upton street 
with a small building, temporarily: and leave to with- 
draw at the request of the petitioners on petition of 
Lang & Delano and others, that a portion of India 
wharf be called India row. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Ciitter, from the Committee on Paving, 
to whom was referred an oi-der proposing the revoca- 
tion of the right to lay tracks by the Metropolitan 
Railroad Company on Walnut avenue, as far as the 
West Roxbury line, made a report recommending the 
passage of an accompanying orde/ of notice: 

Ordered, 'I'hat the Metropolitan Railroad Company 
be notified to appear before this Board on Monday, 
the 24th of Kebruai-y, instant, at A o'clock P.M., 
aud show cause why the right granted to said com- 
pany in November, IS.'i.'i, to lay tracks in Walnut 
avenue (Roxbury), from Warren "avenue to the West 
Koxbnry line, should not be revoked. 

The report was acceptefl, and the order of notice 
was adopted. 

Alderman Clark, fr(mi the Joint Standing Commit- 
tee on Streets, to whom were referred the report and 
order of the Committee on Streets of the Board of 
Aldermen, requesting an additional loan of $3,000,000 
for the purpose of widening, extending, grading and 
paving the streets within the "Burnt District" (,so 
called; made a report recommending the passage of 
the order. 

The report was accepted and the order was passed, 
as follows: 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be and hereby is au- 
thorized, under the direction of the Committee on 
Finance, to borrow the sum of $2,000,000, the same 
to be added to the Burnt District Loan. 

NOMINATION AND ELECTION OP ASSESSORS. 

Alderman Brown , from the committee to nominate 
candidates for Assessors, made a report recommend- 
ing the election of Thomas Hills, Benjamin dishing, 
Horace Smith, Thomas J. Bancroft, and Daniel H. 
Whitney. 

The Board proceeded to an election, when the 
several persons named were unanimously reelected. 

SUPERINTENDENT OP COMMON. 

Alderman Clark, from the special committee to 
nominate a Superintendent of Common and Public 
Grounds, made a report recommending the election 
of John Galvin. The report was accepted, and the 
Board proceeded to an election, when Mr. Galvin was 
elected, by a vote of 11 to 1, for Henry A. May. 

SUPERINTENDENTS OP BRIDGES. 

Alderman Gibson, from the joint special committee 
appointed to nominate suitable candidates for super- 
intendents of the several bridges which are under the 
control of the city of Boston, made a report recom- 
mending the election of the following-named per- 
sons: 

Superintendent of Federal-street Bridge— Jacob 
N orris. 

Superintendent of Dover-street Bridge — Angus 
Nelson. 

Superintendent of Chelsea-street Bridge— Edward 
T. Stowers. 

Superintendent of (iranite Bridge — Albert O. Hawes. 

Superintendent of Neponset Bridge — John Glavin. 

Superintendent of Broadway Bridge— John C. 
Poole. 

Superintendent of Mount Washington-avenue 
Biidge — George H. Davis. 

The report was accepted, and the Board proceed- 
ing to elections, each of the above named was unan- 
imously elected. 

elTV SOLICITOR. 

Alderman Power, from the jointspecial committee 
to nominate a suitable candidate for the ofHce of 
City Solicitor, made a report recommending the re- 
election of John P. Healy. 

Mr. Harrington, of the Common Council, dissented, 
and presented the name of Oliver Stevens in place of 
John P. Healy. 

The report was accepted, and Mr. Healy was elected 
by a unanimous vote. 



HARBOR MASTER. 

Alderman Power, from the joint special committee 
appointed to nominate a suitable candidate for the 
olliieof Il.ulxir Master, made a report, recommending 
the rcelecliou of John T. Gardner. 

The report was accepted, and Mr. Gardner was 
unanimously elected. 

SUPERINTENDENT OP SEWERS. 

Alderman Power, from the joint special committee 
appointed to nominate a suitable candidate for the 
office of Superintendent of Sewers, made a report 
lecommending the reelection of William H. Bradley. 

The report was accepted, and Mr. Bradley was 
elected by a unanimous vote. 

SUPERINTENDENT OP STREETS. 

Alderman Bigelow, from the joint special commitee 
appointed to nominate a suitable candidate for office 
of Superintedent of Streets, made a report recom- 
mending the election of C^iarles Harris. 

The report was accepted, and Mr. Harris was elect 
ed by a unanimous vote. 

ELECTIONS op C THER OPPICERS, 

Elections of other officers were taken up, the re- 
sult being the choice of each by a unanimous vote, 
as follows: 

Superintendent of Fire Alarms— Jolm F. Kennard. 

Clerk of Committees — James M. Bugbe4>. 

City Registrar— Nicholas A. Apollonio. 

City Messenger — Alvali 11. Peters. 

Commisioner of Cedar Grove Cemetery — William 
Pope. 

Superintendent of Public Buildings — James C. 
Tucker. 

Superintendent of Public Lands— Robert W. Hall. 

Water Registrar— William F. Davis. 

City Engineer —Joseph P. Davis. 

City Surveyor -Thomas W. Davis. 

Commissioners on the Public Landing Place in 
Milton— Edmund J. Baker. E. J. Bispham, E. H. R. 
Ruggles. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Aldennan Gibson — 

Ordered, That the Committee on Bridges be author- 
ized to provide new engines for opening and closing 
the draw of the Broadway bridge ; the expense, not 
exceeding $4000, to be charged to the appropriation 
for Bridges. 

On motion of Alderman Clark — 

Ordered, That the sum of $1100 be and hereby is 
appropriated to pay for t\\ ent3^-five portable fire ex- 
tinguishers, to replace those destroyed at the fire of 
Nov. 9 and 10; the same to be charged to the appro- 
priation for the Fire Department. 

Ordered, That a bill of James Munroe, Assistant- 
Engineer of the Fire Department, for personal ser- 
vices amounting to $.31 nO. be allowed for payment by 
the Auditor of Accounts, provided it is approved in 
the usual manner. 

On motion of Alderman Sayward, an order was 
adopted giving the usual rules and regulations gov- 
erning tlie granting of licenses to minors, providing 
for licenses to be granted on application of parent, 
guardian or next friend, that they shall attend school 
two hours each day, the licenses to specify the arti- 
cles to be sold; the minor to wear his badge in sight, 
to confine himself to the place specified, not to con- 
gregate together, the licenses to be for a definite pe- 
riod, to be exhibited to any officer of this city for in- 
spection, not to be transferred or exchanged, etc. 

SCHOOL MODELS AT VIENNA. 

Alderman Gaffiold offered the following order: ■ 

Ordered, That the Board of School Committee be 
authorized to expend a sum not exceeding $8000 for 
the purpose of exhiliitingthe system of puhlie school 
education of this city at the Vienna Exposition, to 
take place in May next: said sum to lie charged to 
appropriation for School Committee. 

Alderman Gaffield explained as the plan proposed 
to occupy a small building of one room, with the 
usual paraphernalia of desks, furniture, text and re- 
ference books, with drawings and photographs of 
schoolhouses. The (}eneral Government would send 
a person to exhibit it, and the sum named w(uild be 
the fir.st co.st. The furniture would proiiably sell at 
the cost in this country. The mea.snre was not strict- 
ly legal, yet the citizens would like to have it carried 
out in stretching a point. He had obtained a note 
from Mr. Stackpole,;stating as the opinion of the City 
Solicitor, that it was not legal. 

Alderman Power said they bad spent a greater part 
of the afternoon in a discussion of the subject of 
economy. This question was strictly an illegal one, 
but if the scliool system of Boston was a defective 
one, he would be willing to expend nuniey for the 
purpose of improving it. There was no need of this 
expenditure, and if it was a matter of pride in rela- 



46 



boart:) of ALT:>KRjvrii;M. 



tion to our schools, the United States Government 
should pay the bills. The expense would he ahout 
as much as was spent for junketing last year. 

Alderman Brown said he had the assurance that 
any furniture needed would be furnished free of 
Cost. 

Alderman Power said that would not alter the case, 
for the committee came here for a certain amount to 
be appropriated. 

Alderman Hulhert stated that Alderman Gaftield 
spoke to him about this matter before the meeting 
of the Board, and he replied that he would think of 
it. On consulting the City Solicitor, he was assured 
it was not legal. They were under solemn bonds and 
rules, as trustees are. and their action must be limit- 
ed. He appreciated the motives for the proposed 
action, bnt could not vote for it. 

As representatives of the Government, burdened 
with expen,ses. they could not expend a dollar which 
the exigencies or wants of the citj' do not require. 
The citizens were not aware of the amount of ex- 
penditures which would be required the present year, 
when a million of dollars did not look larger tlian a 
button. It was neither lawful uor expedient to make 
this expenditure, and while he should be glad to 
have our school system represented, unless citizens 
put their hands into their pi'iyate purses he could not 
see how it could be done. 

Alderman Gibson said he fully indorsed the views 
of the Alderman. 

Alderman Gaffield said tlie rejxirt was authorized 
before the opinion of the City Solicitor was ob- 
tained, and as the exhibition was one to which all 
nations were expected to contribute, it was desirable 
that they should respond, inasmuch as in 1S76 a cen- 
tennial exhibition would be held in this country, by 
which something might be gained to our educational 
systems, if we resjiond to this. 

Alderman Power said the little education he had 
was obtained in the Boston .schools, and while he had 
as much pride in the schools as any one, he did not 
think we should be justified in this expenditure of 
money. If the City Solicitoi's advice was worth any- 
thing, we had no right to pass an order in which the 
expenditure was so clearly illegal as in this one. 
• Alderman Stebbins asked the Chair to rule that the 
order was not jn'operly before the Board, not being 
legal. 

The Chair ruled that the order lies over. 

Aldennan Stebbins said his request was that the 
order be ruled out, not being legal. 

The Chair did not so tmderstand the request, for. 
on the same ground, he might have ruled out the 
order to open the library on Sundays. 

The order was laid over. 

Alderman Quincy offered the following order: 

Ordered, That tlie City Messenger be authorized to 
procure official badges oif the pattern adopted by tlie 



last Board of Aldermen for such mi-mbers of the 
present Board as are not pro\ided therewith, at an 
expense not exceeding three dollars per badge. 

Alderman Hulbert wished to know the use of such 
badges. 

Alderman Clark stated that the Board of Aldermen 
did not have any badges last year, until the fire, and it 
was found necessary to ha^■e them in order to the 
proper discharge of their duties in getting access to 
the burnt district. 

Alderman Quincy believed it to be desirable to have 
some distinctive badge by which they might at all 
times discharge their duties. 

Alderman Sayward suggested that the furnishing 
of badges was illegal, and every memlier should get 
his own and pay for it. 

An amendment was accepted to add the words "to 
be paid for by such members."' and the order was 
passed. 

Alderman Clark rose to a personal explanation in 
relation to a paragraph published in the Common- 
wealth alleging that a greater price was paid for the 
land for the Swett-street hospital than it was ottered 
for to an individual previously, the price paid being 
.fTrj.OOn. while $40.00(1 was the price at which it was 
oflered. 

As evidence on that point he wished to read the 
following letter: 

Boston, Feb. H. 1873. 

Dear Sir — An article in the Commonwealth, Janua- 
ry 2.5, conveys a false impression as to the land sold 
for a smallpox hos])ital on Swett street, as appears by 
the books of the corporation. As treasurer of the 
Roxbury Central Wharf Company.! sold that land 
to the city for fT.'S.OOO. allowing no one any commis- 
sion or brokerage, and receiving the whole sum for 
the benefit of the coiporation. I ne\'er bonded oi- 
offered to bond the land for $40,000. or for any other 
sum, nor did T ever offer it for sale or fix a price for 
it until I sold it to the city of Boston. I would furth- 
er add. that $7.5.000 is the lowest sum for which I 
would sell the above lot undei' any circumstances. 

A. I). Wii.i.i.^MS, 

J. T. Clark, Esq.. Alderman. 

Alderman Clark stated further that the land in 
(juestion was worth $1 per foot, and the company 
sold it to the city only in the expectation that there- 
by they would secure the (extension of Swett sti'eet. 
and increase the value of their remaining land, 

OKDEKS OF NOTICE. 

On petition of Joseph M'atson, for leave to locate 
and use a steam boiler and engine at 127 Portland 
street. Hearing Mcrnday. Feb. 24. 4 P. M. 

On petition of Bartlett <fe Richardson, for leave to 
locate a steam boiler at :iS9 Broadway. Hearing Mon- 
day, Feb. 24, 4 P. M. 

Adjourned. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



4r7 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Oonnoil, 

H'KBKUAKY O, lH7a. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Ooiiiinon Coun- 
cil was held this evening, at 7>rf o'clock, Edward O. 
Shepard, the President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The iinnual report of the Commissioners on Bridges 
between Boston and Cambridge, the quarterly reports 
of the Overseers of the Poor and of the City Regis- 
trar, the communication relative to the appo'intment 
of members of the Common Council as special police 
officers without pay, and the petition of the Trustees 
of the Prince Library, were severally ordered to be 
placed on file. 

The petitions of John H. Roberts, Hannah Sulli- 
van, Philp McDonough, Robert Irwin, M. C. Murray, 
Joseph K. and Mary J. Melcher, Winchester* Hight, 
and of Washington Hook & Ladder Company No. 4, 
were se'^'crally referred, in concurrence. 

The following references were concurred in : 

References to the Committee on Finance of 

1. A request for an additional appropriation of 
$11,500 for the City Hospital. ^Printed City Doc. 
No. 19, 1873.) 

2. A request for an additional appropriation of 
$;5000, for (ieneral Printing. (Printed City Doe. No. 
22, 187;i) 

The following order was passed, in concuncnce: 
Report in favor of the passage of the order author- 
izing a loan of $2,000,000 to be added to the Burnt 
District Loan, and passage of said order. 
The following orders were severally read once: 
Order that f 1100, to pay for twenty-fi\e portable 
fire extinguishers, to replace those destroyed by fire 
November 9, 1872, be appropriated. 

Order to pay James Munroe, Assistant Engineer of 
the Fire Department, $31 .^0, for personal services, 
provided the bill be approved in the usual manner. 

The rules in relation to the order of business were 
suspended, for the purpose of taking up the unfin- 
ished business. 

OPENING OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY ON SUNDAYS. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 7, the report in 
favor of the order for the opening of the reading 
rooms of the Public Library from 2 to 9 P. M. on 
Sundays, and the dissent of Charles Hulhert there- 
from, was considered. 

Mr. Cud worth of Ward 11, said he had asked for the 
postponement of the order for the purpose of further 
considering it, and on that consideration he was op- 
posed to its passage. There may be many thiii^s in 
favor of its adoption, and many against it. There 
could not be many persons who could get much good 
from visiting the library on Sunday, and the proba- 
bilities were that it would simply be a place of re- 
sort. In that respect the opening of the library 
would be very exceptionable, affording a place only 
for those who are wandering about the streets, and it 
would not add to the good order or good habits of 
the city. That would be one reason why he should 
object "to opening the library on Sunday. 

Objection would be made by him also from con- 
scientious scruples. There being six days in the 
week for the purpose of taking books from the libra- 
ry, it would be more creditable to the city to have 
the library closed on one day, rather than have a 
place for persons to loiter away their time and be in 
the way. They had been told by the City Solicitor 
that it would be illegal, and that they had iio right to 
open the library on Sundays. If they employ a man 
to tell them what is legal, and one who knows what 
is the law, they should" be willing to take his advice 
in the matter, and the library should not be open to 
anybody. They should respect the law and not 
trample it down, and for these reasons it was clear to 
him that it was his duty to vote against the order. 

The question was taken and the order was passed, 
by a vote of 47 yeas, 10 nays, as follows: 

Yeas— Abbott. Adams. Anderson, Barnes, Bicknell, 
Blackmar, Brackett, Breiman, Burditt, Burt, Caton. 
Collins. Dacey, Darrow, Davis, Dean, Denny, N. 
Doherty, Edwards. Flatley, Flynn, Hall, Harrington, 
Holmes, Jones, Kelley, Kingsley, Loring, Madden, 
Marston, Martin. McCiie. McKenney, Perkins, Pick- 
ering, Powers, Risteen, Shaw. Thacher, Train, 
Upham, Warren, Wells, West, Whiston, Woods, 
Woodward. 

Nays— Bowles, Cutlworth, Hine, Morse, Page, Pease, 
Prescott, Tower, Weston, Wilbur. 



Mr. Flynn moved a reconsideration ol' the vote, 
which was lost. 

The following orders were severally read the second 
time and passed: 

Order Ihat $1940 be appropriated to pay the bill of 
steaming Louis Osborn, for services at the tire of 
November 9 and 10, and during the following week. 

Order that the bill of S. B. lleustis, of $17, for 
extra service as a police officer, be allowed for pay- 
menl, provided it be approved in the usual manner." 

EXPENDITURES FOR REFRESHMENTS. 

The order for the Auditor to submit a monthly 
statement of the expenditures on account of refresh- 
ments for standing or special committees of the City 
Council, or either i)ranch, was taken up. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 offered the following order as 
a substitute for the order of the Board of Aldermen: 

Ordered, That from and after this date, no commit- 
tee shall approve, nor shall the Auditor audit, nor 
shall the Treasurer pay any bill contracted by any 
committee of the City Council, or of either branch 
or any mei;nber thereof, or any bill contracted by any 
member of the City Council i'or refreshments of any 
name or nature, or for carriage hire, unless said bill 
is contracted under a special vote of the City Council 
passed prior to contracting the same. 

The yeas and nays were ordered on the final pass- 
age of the order. 

Mr. Pease of Ward 1 rose to a personal explanation. 
According to the published reports of the Board of 
Aldermen, one of the Aldermen stated that the com- 
mittee to nominate a candidate for City Mes.seuger 
met and had a dinner at an expense of $41. The 
statement was false in every particular, as the com- 
mittee were together but three minutes, when a nom- 
ination was made unanimously and the committee 
dispersed. 

Mr. West of Ward Uj believed the gentleman was 
mistaken as to the reference to the committee of the 
present year, and thought the statement had refer- 
ence to a previous committee. 

Mr. Pease replied that no year was mentioned, but 
as it was published, and generally believed, the ref- 
erence was to the report of the committee of the 
present year. He believed the report of the doings 
of the Board would bear out his idea. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward (1 said he could not vote for 
the substitute, and he did not know whether the 
mover believed it would be adopted. If it should be. 
it would seriously interfere with the public business, 
for in the case of carriage hire, it could not be known 
when carriages would be needed so that they could 
be provided at a meeting of the Council prior to their 
being wanted. Suppose that carriages might be 
needed to go to a distant part of the city, a delay 
must occur in going, or the members of the commit- 
tee go on foot, for they could not reach all points by 
cars. 

The adoption of such an order might do for tactics, 
but he thought it undesirable. The order of the 
Board of Aldermen must have had in view one of 
two things— either that the Auditor would be re- 
quired to report the name of the chairman of the 
committee, or in his absence that of the senior mem- 
ber of the committee, oi the names of every member 
who took part in the dinner. If it required only that 
the chairman's name be given it was well enough, 
but if it was designed thai every meinbei of the com 
mittee who goes to the dinner' should be served up 
for the instruction of the public, it was objection- 
able. 

The hardest workers were not always the largest 
eaters, and there was no reason why members of the 
City Council, when on public duties, should not dine 
at the expense of the city. If the expense was to be 
incurred, and the chairman of the committee ap- 
prove of it, he had no objection; and if any one 
wished to see how many dined, they could find out. 
by going to a little l)ook, which w'onld show it. If 
the order of the gentleman was to be adopted, so 
much as related to carriage hire should be cut off, 
as a proper expenditure. If it was ii. tended l6 
make the Board of Aldermen eat their own words, he 
was oppo.sed to it, and did not believe in it.| 

Mr. Wells of Ward 3 said he was in favor of the 
substitute, for one Alderman said the order was 
passed there to keep the Common Council in check. 
As far as he was concerned, he was ready logo to 
the park, or anywhere else outside of the city, with- 
out an expense for carriage hire. The members of 
the Board have passes, and in that respect liave an 
advantage over members of the Council. As far as 
eating and drinkins was (•(uicerned, he could live one 
year without it, and the members of the Council 
should be willing to go with him one year On the 
report of the proceedings of the. Board, the news- 
papers say the Board have got the Council. He 



4.8 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



would pass the substitute, and see whether the Board 
conld live as long as we can. 

Mr. Flynn of"Ward7said he ofl'ered the order in 
good faith and he wished the Board of Aldermen to 
be consistent. The members of the Eoaixl dined be- 
fore their meeting, and twenty minutes after the ad- 
journment five out of six dined at Parker's at the ex- 
pense of the city. 

Mr. Dean of Ward 12 said he was inclined to vote 
for the substitute, because after its adoption they 
could strike out the provision relating to carriage 
hire. He did not like the order of the Board of 
Aldermen, believed it to be an undignified proceed- 
ure, and should regret to belong to a body of full- 
grown men who seek to hold up members of the City 
Council to ridicule. It might be well enough in 
schoolboys, to induce them to improve in manners 
and conduct, but not in full-grown men, to report 
their misdoings. 

If it was de"signed for a criticism of their fellows 
to hold them in check, it was undignified. He did 
not believe in bantering with the other branch, but 
believed they might adopt the substitute with the 
provision relating to carriage hire struck out. Pub- 
lic business could not well be transacted without car- 
riage hire. They all knew that members of the 
Board of Aldermen must sacrilic thousands of dol- 
lars a year in time spent in the public service, and 
the expenditure for carriage hire would be but a tri- 
fling amount. He was willing to vote for the substi- 
tute and give the order a fair trial. 

Mr. Perkins said he understood the Auditor had 
given as his construction of the order that the name 
of every member of a committee who took part in a 
dinner should be published, and if so he should vote 
for the substitute, to be amended by striking out the 
provision relating to carriage hire. 

Mr. Benny of Ward 9 inquired how it was proposed 
to amend the order. 

Mr. Dean replied that the order forbids the fur- 
nishing of refreshments at the expense of the city, 
also tlie furnishing of carriages. The latter provision 
was very important, because business could not be 
transacted without the use of carriages. The Paving 
Committee perhaps every day may be required to go 
to distant parts of the city, and they could not get 
along without carriage hire. He proposed to strike 
out the provision relating to carriage hire. 

Mr. Denny said he was not tender-footyd in the 
matter, and believed the city should pay for carriage 
hire, and if business was to be transacted the city 
should also pay for eating, when necessar}-. Neither 
would the citizens object to anything reasonable be- 
ing expended for carriage hire or refreshments. The 
Board of Aldermen no doubt passed its order in good 
faith, and as there were forty committees, thirty- 
three of which were joint, he supposed the chairman 
of each would indorse all orders for carriages and re- 
freshments and the responsibility for such expendit- 
ures would rest on the Aldermen. Between the two 
the Board of Aldermen were the greatest eaters, and 
any stigma there might be would fall on them. 

It could not be expected by the gentleman from Ward 
7 that his substitute would pass the other branch, 
and as the United States Senate recently passed an 
act to abolish the franking privilege in the belief 
that the House would kill it, but they were taken at 
their own action, much to the satisfaction of the peo- 
ple, so as the Board of Aldermen had passed the or- 
der under consideration, he was in favor of passing 
it. In his own case, he would not hesitate to assume 
the responsibility of ordering carriages or refresh- 
ments when necessary, not fearing that public opin- 
ion would be against him in the slightest degree. 

Mr. Dean moved to amend the substitute by strik- 
ing out so much as referred to carriage hire. 

Mr. Wells said he did not know why they should 
strike out carriage hire. There were only a certain 
few who had the benefit of carriage hire. The Coun- 
cil were of no more consequence than the fifth wheel 
of a coach after the appropriations were made. 

Mr. Perkins rose to a question of order in the reflec- 
tions upon the Council. 

Mr. Wells said he did not believe in members of the 
Council having carriage hire, and in seven years in 
the Council he never rode twenty times at the city's 
'expense. The adoption of the substitute was the 
proper method of meeting the question. 

Mr. Perkins stated in illustration as a good reason 
why the amendment should prevail, that the Commit- 
tee on Legislative Business, wishing the Committee 
of the Legislature to visit the Lunatic Hospital at 
South Boston, took them there in carriages, where 
they had an opportunity to see the necessity for a 
new hospital. With the business which that commit- 
tee had before them, had they not been taken there 
it is not likely they would have got them there. The 
result was very satisfactory, and he should consider 
the expense a good investment. 



Mr. Dean said he agreed mainly with the gentleman 
from Ward 9, and that the question would resolve 
itself finally into a passage of the order of the Board. 
The citizens would not object to reasonable expense 
for refreshments, he was couvinced; but he was wil- 
ling to give the order a fair trial, with the carriage 
hire out of the question. 

Mr. Blackmar of Ward 11 said that the upper 
branch, in their action, had assumed that the City 
Council had bc^en expeusi\-e and extravagant, while 
there was no more economical city than the city of 
Boston. It was not right that the Impression should 
go abroad that the Government was extravagant and 
wasteful. The whole expense last year for junket- 
ing, and that was a wrong term, for much of it was 
for necessary items of a different character, would 
not exceed $12,000. Some gentlemen give a gr at 
portion of their time to the benefit of the city; some- 
times sit on committees from two to twelve o'clock, 
and often to five, six or seven o'clock in the evening, 
away from their places of business and their homes, 
with no time to go to dinner or supper. In such cases 
it was proper and right that they should obtain re- 
freshments at the expense of the city, and by our 
sanction. 

There was no member of the City Council who was 
guilty of extravagance last year, for some years the 
expenses had been .f30,000, and these had been re- 
duced down to $19,000. This was not a wide range 
for so many members of the Government. Yet it 
might be well to pass the order and place the respon- 
sibility where it belongs, on the Board of Aldermen. 
The Council should stand on its dignity and make a 
clean showing in the matter. 

Mr. Pickering of Ward fi said he agreed with the 
gentlemen from Wards 9 and 12 generally in their 
views. Tliere were some needs of reform, but they 
should be governed by a .sense of propriety. He 
should prefer the substitute to the original order, but 
did not like either. The order of the other branch 
appeared like that of the whipping of a school boyfor 
tricks on the master, and he hnd hoped that something 
would be adopted more satisfactory. The expendi- 
ture of .j,12,000 last year was but fifty cents a day for 
each of them, and that was making the members a 
cheap lot. If they were not worth that, they had 
better get rid of tliem. and the better it would be for 
them and for the city. 

The question was taken on the amendment of Mr. 
Dean, to strike out carriage hire, which was lost, 25 
to 31, when the substitute was adopted, by a vote of 
35 to 9. 

As adopted, the substitute was passed, by a vote of 
44 yeas to 15 nays, as follows: 

Yeas — Abbott, Adams, Anderson, Barnes, Black- 
man, Bleiler, Brackett, Brennan, Burt, Caton, Col- 
lins, Cudwoith, Dacey, Davis, N. Doherty. Edwards, 
Flatley, Flynn, Hall, Harrington, Hine, Jones, 
Kelley, Kiugsley_, Loring, Madden, Marston, Martin, 
Morse, Page, Pickering, Powers, Prescott, Kisteen, 
Shaw, Thacher, Train, Fpham, Warren, Wells, West, 
Whiston, Woods, Woodward. 

Nays— Bicknell, Bowles, Burditt, Darrow, Dean, 
Denny, Holmes, Lamb, McCue, McKenney, Pease, 
Perkins, Tower, Weston, Wilbur. 

Mr. Flynn moved a reconsideration of the vote, 
which was lost. 

ELECTION op ASSESSORS. 

The, report nominating Thomas Hills, Benjamin 
Cushiiig, Horace Smith, Thomas J. Bancroft and 
Daniel H. Whitney as Assessors was accepted in con- 
currence, and the Council proceeded ti: an election, 
the wliole number of votes being 58. 

Thomas Hilis had 52 

Benjamin Cliushiug 56 

Horace Smith 52 

Thomas .1. I5ancroft 57 

Daniel H. Wliitney 56 

Scattering 3 

Messrs. Hills, Cushing, Smith, Bancroft and Whit- 
ney were declared to be elected, in concurrence. 

Certificates of elections were read, and elections 
took place as follows: 

CITT MESSENGER. 

Whole number of votes 59, all of which were for 
Alvah H. Peters. 

StTPEBINTENDENT OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Whole number of ^'otes 53, all of which were for 
James C. Tucker. 

CLERK or COMMITTEES. 

Whole number of votes 50, all of which were for 
James M. Bugbee. 

The reports nominating persons for election to 
office in various departments were accepted, in con- 
currence, and elections took placfe with results as fol- 
lows: 



FEBRUARY 6, 1873 



4r9 



SlIVEBINTENnENT OV SBWEKS. 

Whole number of votes 47, of vvhieli 'fi were fov 
William TT. Bradley anrl 2 for otherp. 

CITY SURVEYOR. 

\\'h()le number of votes 44, all of wliicli were for 
Thomas W. Davis. 

HARBOR MASTER. 

Whole number of votes 41, all of which were for 
John T. Gardner. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

Whole number of votes 53, of which 50 were for 
Charles Harris and 3 lor two other persons. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF COMMON. 

Mr. Powers of Ward 4 inquired if Mr. Galvin, the 
nominee of the committee, was a resident of this 
city. 
The Chair replied that he was unable to state. 
Mr. Perkins of Ward 4 said Mr. Galvin voted in 
Ward 4 at the last election. 

The result of the ballot was declared to be as fol- 
lows; 

AVhole number of votes 52 

Necessary to a choice ST. 

Joliu Galvin 35 

"vVilliam E. Doyle, Jr 9 

John G-lnvin 5 

Henry A. May ^ 

H. Ghxndel 1 

Mr. Galvin was declared to be elected. 
Mr. Dacey, chairman of the committee on count- 
ing votes, siibsequently asked to be allowed to cor- 
rect the report, in which he stated that the five votes 
for John Glavin were for an ineligible candidate. 

The Chair stated that the result wouid not be 
effected. 

COMMISSIONERS ON PUBLIC LANDING PLACE IN MILTON. 

Whole number of votes 49, of which E. J. Baker, 
E. J. Bispham and E. H. R. Ruggles had 47 each, and 
there were 4 scattering. 

SUPERINTENDENT OP PUBLIC LANDS. 

Whole number of votes 47, of which 46 were for 
Robert W. Hall, and one for Angus Nelson. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF EIRE ALARMS. 

Whole number of votes 48, all of which were for 
John F. Kennard. 

CITY ENGINEER. 

. Whole number of votes 47, all of which wore for 
Joseph P. Davis. 

CITY REGISTRAR. 

Whole number of votes 39, 36 of which were for 
Nicholas A. ApoUonio, and 3 for three other persons. 

CITY SOLICITOR. 

Whole number of votes 50, 25 of which were for 
John P. Healy, and 25 for Oliver Stevens, and there 
was no choice. 

. Mr. Perkins said it should be the ob.iect of the 
Council to get the best man, and as absent members 
should be consulted, although they should have been 
here, and as it was late, he moved that the election of 
City Solicitor be postponed one week. 

Mr. Dacey of \\'ard 2 said the same reason might 
have been given for postponing other elections, and 
it might happen that not so many members would b^ 
pi'esent next Thursday night. 

Mr. Perkins said the othce was the most important 
one in the city, and they should hesitate long before 
turning out the present City Solicitor. 

The motion to postpone was lost, by a vote of 17 
to 23. 

The second ballot resulted the same as the first, in 
25 votes for each candidate. 

The third ballot resulted in the choice of Mr. Healy 
by a vote of 28 to 23 for Oliver Stevens. 

On motion of Mr. Perkins, the remaining elections 
were postponed to the next meeting of the Council, 
and the City Messenger was authorized to have the 
names of candidates for Supeiintendents of Bridges 
printed on one ballot. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Jane Logue, for compensation as a smallpox nurse. 
Referred to Committee on Health. 

John Keenan, for compensatton for damages to 
property. Referred to Committee on Claims. 

auditor's MONTHLY EXHIBIT. 

The monthly exhibit of the Auditor was presented 
in print, it being an exhibit of the general and special 
appropriations for the present financial year of 1872-73. 
as shown in the books in his office, February 1, 1873, 
including the February draft, being ten months' pay- 
ments of the financial' year— exhibiting the original 
appropriations, the amount expended, and the bal- 
ance of each unexpended at that date. A recapitula- 
tion gives the following result : 



General . 

SpP<'Till. . 



Appropriations, 

KCVI'llllCH, !■((•. 

$!l,lt()4,.H'.l 01 

. . . . 8,1U(),U5 1 GH 



Expended. Unexpended. 

.■t;8,2(;8,51;a 88 $1,035,876* Iti 

3,flB0,72C 60 4,4.15,328 OS 



Iiil8,310,473 67 
Ordered to be sent up. 



$12,229,269 48 $6,081,204 19 



RFPORT op committee ON ELECTIONS. 

Mr. Bicknell of Ward 4, from the ( Committee on 
Elections, to whom was referred the petition of Wil- 
liam M. Flanders and others, representing that George 
A. Shaw was not a resident of Ward 5 at the date of 
the last municipal election, and that the fact of his 
uon-residence was publicly known to the voters of 
said ward who voted for him at said election, having 
notified, met and heard the parties, with their evi- 
dence and the argnments of their respective counsel, 
submitted the following report: 

The ground of the petitioners" objection to Mr. 
Shaw's occupying a seat in the Council is, that he 
was not, when elected, an "inhabitant" of Ward 5, as 
required by the city charter, section twenty. 

On this question witnesses were brought forward 
on behalf of the petitioners and Mr. Shaw, and from 
their testimony it appears as follows: 

In 1866 Mr. Shaw's domicile was in the United States 
Hotel, in Ward 5, This was proved and was not dis- 
puted. 

In the autumn of 1866, or early in 1867, Mr. Shaw re- 
moved with his family, consisting of his wife, his son 
and daughter, to a house in Marion street, in Brook- 
line. 

It was not clearly shown to whom this house be- 
longed, but it appeared to have stood in the name of 
Mr. Shaw's wife. 

From the time of said removal Mr. Shaw continued 
to live in Marion street with his family until Novem- 
ber, 1872. 

In November, 1872, Mr. Shaw removed from Brook- 
line. He afterwards appears boarding in Tremont 
street, in Ward 10 or 11. The house in Marion stree.4 
was sold. 

Since 1868 Mr. Shaw has returned annually to the 
hotel, and has there passed the night of April 30 and 
the day of May 1, being accompanied in 1870, 1871 
and 1872 by his wife. 

No room appears to have been kept exclusively for 
him in the above-named hotel since his removal to 
Brookline. • 

These are the facts relating to Mr. Shaw's actual 
place of residence since his removal from Ward 5 in 
1866 or 1867. 

The evidence of Mr. Shaw's intentions, so far as 
the same affect the question of domicile, is as fol- 
lows : 

Mr. Shaw has continuously, since his removal from 
Wards, declared that he was an "■whahitant o/'," or 
that his "^residence" was in Ward 5, and that he in- 
tended to continue an inhabitant or resident of said 
ward. 

And he has accordingly been assessed as a resident 
in Ward 5, from 1858 to 1873 inclusive, for tax on poll 
and personal property. 

One witness says that Mr. Shaw a\owcd to him his 
intention to retvni to ri-t,Ule in Ward 5. 

There was evidence to show that Mr. Shaw removed 
to Brookline to take care of his wife's father and 
mother, the former of whom was an old man and in 
ill health. 

Mr. Shaw has voted in Ward 5 with few exceptions, 
and taken part in the municipal att'airs of the ward, 
and he has been on the register of voters in Boston 
for the last ten years. 

Mr. Shaw ha,'; never voted in Brookline nor taken 
part in municipal aft'airs there, but has disclaimed all 
right so to do, on the ground that he was an inhabi- 
tant of Boston, and he has paid no poll nor personal- 
property tax in Brookline. 

Since 1866, Mr. Shaw has lield otBce as an inhabi- 
tant of Ward 5, having acted as Warden pro tern., in 
June, 1869, and as Kepresentative t,o the General 
Court in 1872. In 1869 he was appointed a commis- 
sioner on the part of Boston on tb(> annexation of 
Dorchester, by Mayor Shurtlcff. 

When elected a director of the Western Huilw ay on 
the part of the State, in 1867, the ballots weic printed 
"George A. Shaw of Browkline," as ajipcars l)v the 
.iournal of the House, March 6, 1867. But in the 
Manual of the Legislature published in 1868, he is en- 
tered as George A. Shaw of Boston. It in no way 
appears that the above-numti(nicd ballots were print- 
ed by Mr. Shaw or under his direction, or that he 
authorized the said descriptive words, "of Brook- 
line." 

These are the facts pro\ed in the case. 

Certain questions of law met the committee on the 
threshold, and accordingly a letter was addressed to 
the City Solicitor, who returned the following reply: 



50 



COMMON ooxjisroiij. 



City Solicitor's Office, i 

2 Pemberton Square, Boston, Feb. 4, 1873. )" 

Sir — I have cousidered the questions yon proposed 
to me, and my answers to them are as follows : 

Question 1 — If Mr. Shaw had a legal domicile in 
Ward 5, in Boston, in 18Hti, and in that year removed 
himself and his family to Brookline, and there re- 
mained until November, 1872, and since ISWl had no 
house, room, or other place of actual abode in Ward 
5, was his domicile in Boston necessarily lost? 

Answer— Not necessarily. 

Question 2 — If, in the case above stated, Mr. Shaw 
had passed yearly the nights of April 30 and May 1 in 
Ward 5, would that^f act have made his domicile neces- 
sarily in Ward 5? 

Answer — No. I regard the passing of these nights 
in Ward 5 as of no sfgnificance whatever. He might 
as well have selected any other two nights for the 
purpose, or passed no nights in that ward. 

Question 3 — If Mr. Shaw were living, as first above 
stated, in Brookline, would a declared intention to 
continue an inhabitant or resident of Ward 5 neces- 
sarily be equivalent to a declared intention to return 
to reside in Ward 5? 

Answer — Not necessarily. If, however, he under- 
Stood the law, he could not suppose that his resi- 
dence could be retained in Ward 5, unless his inten- 
tion was to return there. 

Question 4 — If Mr, Shaw went to Brookline, as 
above stated, and remained there for any lengtli of 
time, witli no definite intention to return to reside in 
Wnrd b, and with no intention to leave Brookline at 
any definite time, would hisJdomicUe be in Boston, or 
would it be in Brookline? 

Answer — In Brookline. 

I am, very respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 

J. P. He ALT. 

E. J. Holmes, Esq. 

It is an axiom of the law of domicile that an old 
domicile is retained until a new one is acquired. 

And that to acquire a new domicile there must be 
the union of actual residence with the intent to have 
a domicile at such place of residence; or actual resi- 
dence, with no definite intention of returning to the 
old place of domicile, and no intention to leave such 
place of residence at any particular time. 

See Hallet rs. Basset, 100 Mass., 1H7; Sleeper vs. 
Paige, 15 Gray, 349: Whitney tv. Sherbourne, 12 All., 
Ill; Farlee v.-'. Runk, Cont. Elections in Cong., 1834^ 
1865, p. 87: Miller p.v. Thompson, Ibid, p. 118. 

In the opinion of the committee, then, the case is 
as follows: 

Mr. Shaw was domiciled in Ward 5 in IBWI, and at 
the end of that year moved with his family from Ward 
5 to Brookline, where lie remained until November, 
1872. 

In November, 1872, Mr, Shaw moved into Ward 10 
in Boston, and has since remained there up to the 
present time. 

Mr. Shaw has, from 18(ifi up to the present time, 
always claimed and exercised the rights, and has been 
sub.iect to the duties and burdens, of an inhabitant 
in Ward 5; and he has represented the ward in differ- 
ent capacities since his removal to Brookline in 186K. 
As to Mr. Shaw's intentions, as effecting his domicile, 
Mr. Shaw has always professed an intention to con- 
tinue an "inhabitant'" or "resident" in Ward 5, and 
has accompanied his declarations with acts he deemed 
necessary to give such declarations validity for the 
purpose of retaining his domicile; viz., passing the 
night of April 30 in Ward 5 annually. ' 



The committee are aware that declaring an inten- 
tion to continue an inhabitant of Ward 5, and an in- 
tention to return to re.^idf in Ward 5, ai'e not necessa- 
rily the same thing. 

Mr. Shaw might ha\'e thought that all that was nec- 
essary to do to retain his domicil in Ward 5. was to 
pass the night of April 30 in the W'ard and pay his 
taxes there: and thinking so, mioht have said, "I 
will do these things, and can and will thereby retain 
my doinicil in M'ard .5, although I never intend to re- 
turn to reside in Ward 5." Having done such acts 
he might say, "I am an inhabitant of Ward 5," when 
in fact he was mistaken and was not. 

If this had been the state of the case, Mr. Shaw 
mlsht have lost his domicil in Ward 5. 

The committee have given this view its full weight, 
but do not think the case was as last supposed. 

There is no testimony to show that Mr. Shaw has 
not always had a definite and clearly defined inten- 
tion to return to reside in Ward 5, or an intention to 
return to reside there at a definite time. 

The testimony of Mr. Homer is that Mr. Shaw has 
distinctly declared such an intention. 

Opposed to this and tlio other evidence in support 
of Mr. Shaw's intention to return to reside in Ward 
5, is the fact that he has not returned to reside in 
that Ward. The committee are of opinion that this 
fact is not sufticient to prove an intention in Mr. 
Shaw not to return to reside in Ward 5. 

See Hallet ;-,<. Basset, 100 Mass. 107; Bremer vs. 
Bremer, 1 Deanc, 1112; Collester vs. Hailey, 6 Gray, 
517. 

The presumption is that Mr. Shaw's domicil is in 
Ward 5 in the absence of evidence to the contrary. 

The committee therefore report, that, in their opin- 
ion, George A. Shaw was an inlmbitant of Ward 5 at 
the date of the last municipal election, and is entitled 
to a seat In this Council as a member from Ward 5. 
William E. Bicknell, 
George L. Btjrt, 
Edward J. Holmes, 
Edwin H. Woods, 
William G. Train, 

Committee. 

The committee refer, on the points made in then- 
report, to the various matters of testimony fully re- 
ported, making eighty-two printed pages. 

On motion of Mr. Page of Ward 9, the report was 
laid over for consideration at the next meeting of tlie 
Council. 

Mr. Uenny of Ward 9, from the Committee on 
Health, on the petition of C. Erving Fisher, Assistant 
Port Physician, reported an order to pay Dr. Fisher 
$700 as compensation for extra services from 1st Sep- 
tember, 1872 to 1st Januaiy, 1873. 

The report was accepted and the order was passed. 

On motion of Mr. Denny of Ward 9 — 

Ordered, That the Committee on Legislative Af- 
fairs be requested to procure such a change in the 
city charter as to provide that the erection and con- 
trol of stables shall be under the charge of the City 
Council instead of the Board of Aldermen. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 7, an order was 
read once, that the Mayor be requested to petition 
the Legislature for autiiority to the city to take the 
whole or part of the land boiuided by Northampton, 
Eustis, Albany and Washington streets. 

On motion of Mr. Wells of Ward 3, an order was 
passed to procure suitable badges for the Messen- 
ger, Assistant Messenger and other officers of the 
City Government. 

Adjourned. 



51 



BOARD OF ALDERHVEEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY TO, 187B. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Alder- 
men was held this afternoon, at four o'clock, Alder- 
man Cutter, the Chairman, presiding. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Charles Shuler, for leave to occupy a wooden sta- 
ble for one horse on Saratoga street, No. 47'J. 

Allen & Guthrie, for leave to occupy a wooden 
stable for two horses at 156 Border street. 

A. Firth, for leave to occupy an iron stable for 
twenty-five horses on Atlantic avenue, near Commer- 
cial wharf. 

M. T. Downing, for leave to erect fifty additional 
stalls in stable on Fourth street, South Boston. 

Severally referred to th» Committee on Health, on 
the part of this Board. 

Betsey D. Rich, for apportionment of Cliff-street 
betterments. 

Christian Brown, for apportionment of Cliff-street 
betterments. 

Potter, White & Bailey, to be paid for land taken at 
Nos. 5a and .57 Pearl strec^t, for the exlension of 
Franklin street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

Henry A. Richards, for the application of his "fire 
escape" to the public buildings. Referred to the 
Committee on Public Buildings. 

Sarah M. Allison, to be paid for damages sustained 
by the raising of the grade of Sawyer street. 

Maria McNamara. to be paid for grade damages on 
Fourth street. 

Ellen F. Cilley, to be paid for grade damages on 
Howard avenue. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

Christopher J. Spenceley, for extension of the 
Sawyer-street sewer. 

Amelia Frosin, to be paid for damages caused by a 
defective sewer in Halleck street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Sewers. 

Shoe & Leather Dealers' Insurance Company and 
others, that a steam fire engine be located on Charles 
street, near Poplar street. 

Samuel R. Russell, for leave to attach a turbine 
wheel to the water pipes, as an aid in extinguishing 
fires. 

Referred to the Committee on Fire Department. 

A. C. Norcross, for a license as a pawnbroker at 
No. 92 Court street. 

Joseph Hooker, Post 25 G. A. R., for license for a 
dramatic exhibition at the St. James Theatre. 

James Stevenson, for leave to give a variety enter- 
tainment at the St. James Theatre, March 1. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Licenses. 

Rev. W. F. Mallalieu and seventy-three others, 
against the opening of the Public Library on Sunday. 
Ordered to be sent down. 

An invitation was received from the Protestant 
Association to be reviewed by the City Government, 
at the City Hall, on the 22d of February. Ordered to 
be sent down. 

QUARTERLY REPORT OP THE CITT CLERK. 

The City Clerk reports that for the quarter ending 
January 31, 1873, he has received as fees in his official 
capacity the following sums, viz. : 
Recording mortgages of personal property, assign- 
ments, liens, etc $635 15 

Licenses of billiard rooms 147 OO 

" auctioneers 76 00 

" intelligence offices 3 00 

Use of Faneuil Hall in 1873 218 00 

Total $1079 15 

All of which has been paid to the City Treasurer. 
Ordered to be sent down. 

SAFETY OF THEATRES FROM FIRE. 

The following communication was received from 
David Chamberlin, Inspector of Buildings: 

February 10, 1873. 
To the Honwable the City Coimcil : 

Gentlemen — Pursuant to your recjuest, I have per- 
sonally examined the several theatres in this city, ''to 
ascertain whether sufficient precautions are taken in 
the preparation of the scenery and other theatrical 
effects, and what legislation, if any. is necessary for 
the public safety," and respectfully present the fol- 
lowing report : 

The places included in the above order comprise 
the Boston and Globe theatres, the Boston Museum 
and the Howard Atheneeum. The managers of each 



of these places afforded every facility to obtain the 
necessary information, and I am indebted to them for 
their courtesy and willingness to afford any informa- 
tion bearing on the sub.iect. 

I am infoinied by each of them tliat the canvass 
used for the scenery is jirepared in a solution of 
alum; the ]iaint is laid on with glue sizing, fixing a 
coaling wliicli will not readily ignite, so that when 
the scenery is brought into contact with flame, as I 
know from practical test on the premises, it will not 
blaze, but simply smoulders and smokes, therehv 
giving the alarm, and gradually dies out. 

In the Boston and (tIoIjc tlieatres and the Muse- 
um excellent arrangements are made for the preven- 
tion and extinguishment of fires. The gas jets are 
protected by wire screens and globes and tin shields, 
and hose and pipes connected witli the Cochituate 
water iiipes are kept on the stage ready for immedi- 
a e use. At the Howard Atheuieum tliis last precau- 
tion is not taken, the reason given being that the 
supply pipe is not of sufficient size to admit of hose 
being used. 

At all the theatres fire extinguishers are kept ready 
for immediate use in different parts of the building. 
Great care is taken to keep everything of a combus- 
tible nature away from all source of danger, and 
watchmen are kept on duty during the night. 

In view of the care shown and the present safe 
condition of the several theatres, I see no reason to 
recommend any additional legislation, but as the 
managers have expressed their desire to do anything 
reasonable that will add to the safety of their build- 
ings, I shall consider it my duty, should circum- 
stances require it. to make from time to time such 
suggestions as may appear desirable. 

Ordered to be sent down. 

annual REPORT OF THE COCHITUATE WATER BOARD. 

The annual report of the Cochituate Water Board 
for the year ending April 30, 1872, was laid 
before the Board in print, comprising the reports 
of the Clerk of the Board, City Engineer, Water 
Registrar, the Suijerintendents of the Eastern and 
Western divisions, and the entrineer especially 
employed by this board upon the question of new 
suppl.v, to which they would refer the City Council 
for detailed statements of the progress and condition 
of the water works during the year. 

The Board say a jieiusal of these reports will show 
the works to be in a very satisfactory condition. The 
average level of the water in the lake for the year 
ending Jan. 1, 1K72, was (i .50-100 feet above the level 
of tlie bottom of the conduit, showing an average 
loss of 4 4()-ll)(1 feet from the previous year. 

The short supply of water for the year endirg May 
1, 1871, and the remarkable drought during several 
succeeding months, caused great anxiety, and the 
means for securing an additional supply engaged the 
time and attention of the board. In the month of 
October last, it was determined to employ an engi- 
neer to make surveys, prepare plans and estimates 
for a scheme of works to furnish an additional sup- 
ply of pure water. 

The board were especially fortunate in securing for 
this work the services of Mr. Joseph P. Davis', an 
engineer of large experience and acknowledged 
abilitj'. 

Mr. Davis entered upon the discharge of the duties 
assigned in the month of November, and as the re- 
sult of his investigations it was decided to iietition 
the Legislature for the passage of an act authorizing 
the city to take water from Sudbury River. The 
Legislature gave early attention to tile application, 
passed an act, which received the approval of the 
Governor on the 8th day of April, 1872. A copy of 
the act will be found on page 129. 

The City Council immediately made an appropria- 
tion to enable us to commence the work, and it is 
confidently expected that within thirty days from 
this date we may be able to make a temporary con- 
nection between Sudbury River and Lake Cochituate, 
which will relieve our present needs. 

After making the connection, the engineer will 
proceed with the work of sur\'eys for permanent 
works to connect Sudbury River, not only with Lake 
Cochituate, Init also with C'hestnut-Hill Reservoir. 

Tin; augmented territory of the city, and the con- 
stantly increasing demand for pure water, renders it 
im])erative that, a new conduit to convey water from 
Sudbury Iijver, or liakc Cochituate, to Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir, should be constructed at an early day. 
The capacity of the present (and oi'isjinal) conduit has 
been nearly, if not fully, reached. 

In constructing a new conduit we should recom- 
mend that its capacity be much greater than that of 
the one now in use. 

The engineer lias made a detailed report of his 
labors up to this time, which may be found on pages 
114 to 122. 



FEBRUARY 10, 1873. 



52 



Tlie plan shovvinjj; i\w ])roposod temporary connec- 
tions luis hi'.yn. JithograplK'd, and is sulMiiiftcd lu/rc- 
witli. 

('uiiftiiiiip'ioit <ij' Walcr. Tlic average daily coiu-mui)- 
liou ol' water for tlie year ending Decenilier 81, 1871, 
was 18,945.51)0 gallons; a decrease, as compared vvitli 
the iiii'vious year, of upwards of one million gallons 
|K'r day. 

Will") a cily rapidly increasing in populalion, and 
growing daily in business botlr of mercantile and 
mechanical character, this statement may seem 
strange, l)ut it is easily accounted for in the fact tliat 
llu' .-(immunity were fully aware of the diniinislied 
supply of water, and regulated its use accordingly. 

The income frinn water rates has been $788,- 
a52 5-UIO. being an increase over the previous year 
of $5;i,4(il 81-101), and tlie estimated income for the 
year ending April 30, 1872, is $800,000. 

The expenses have been as follows: 

For the current expenses $277,120 11 

Interest and iireuiiuni on the water delU .')36,S7l) W 

$S1S.1)% 11 
Tlie Treasurer lias credited the ^^■ater Works 

for the same year $S40,707 l"i 

The baUaiee shows an excess ot receipts over 
expenili lures iif $526,711 .'U 

Expended on Chestnut Hill reservoir, 2(i.210 12 

Less receipts, 1,2H5 37 

$ 29.i).14 7r: 

Expended in Wards 18, 14, 15, and 16, 345,372 5S 

" ou new Main and Pipes in Kast Bos- 
ton 37,145 30 

Expended on additional Water Supply, 2,302 81 

S!40!),765;44 
Deduct excess of recen)t.« over expenses this 

year 20,711 31 

Cost of works May 1, 1871 10„571,89() 6\ 

Less auKunits transferred .May 1, 
1M71. from water debt to citv debt, 1,3,52,000 00 

$9,219,896 64 

.Makius the net cost to May 1, 1872 $9,(102,950 74 



The amount transferred from the water debt to the 
city debt, as noted above, materially diminished the 
sum of interest which has usually been charged annu- 
ally to the cost of the works, and, as the result of 
operations, the net gain of receipts over expenditures 
for the current ye'iir has been $20,711 'M. which is 
very satisfactory wlien compared with former years. 

Eaxtern JJirilkm. This divisicm comprises that 
portion of the works lying east of the Brookline 
Reservoir, including the distributing pipes and reser- 
voirsin the city, and is under the .superintendence of 
Mr. E. R, Jones, 

During tlie year tliere has been laid one hundred 
and thirty-three thousand eight hundred and thirty 
feet of main pipe, equal to twenty-live and one-third 
nuies (about one mile more than was laid the previous 
year), making the total amount laid since the com- 
mencement of the work two hundred and nineteen 
and three-fourths miles. 

Connected with these mains are two thousand four 
hundred and thirty-three lire h.Vdrants; of this num- 
ber nine hundred and seventy-seven are of the Lovvry 
pattern. 

The number of service pipes laid during the year 
has been twothonsandtwo hundred and seventy-live, 
measuring seventy-three thousand five hundred and 
fifteen feet, or about fonrteen miles. 

Total number of service pipes. May 1, thirty-four 
flioiLsand nine hundred and seventy. 

In June last water was turned into the forty-eight- 
inch pipes, connecting Chestnu-tHill Reserv()ir with 
the main lines. A few defects have been discovered 
in this line of pipe, only one of which was of a seri- 
ous character. This was, no doubt, attributable to 
jm imperfect casting; fortunately the breakage was 
earl}' discovered, the water shut oft' at the Chestnut- 
ITilfgafe house, and comparatively small damage sus- 
tained. 

Pipes are now being laid from Washington street, 
V\'mA 1^, through Bowdoin and Chur(di' streets, to 
conned with pipes already laid in Hancock street: 
when completed, this line of iiipes will bo snpjilied 
^vith water from the standpipe at the Highlands, and 
1 bus houses u]H)n and in the immediate vicinity of 
Telegraph Hill, South Boston, will be connected with 
Ihe ■' high -service."' • 

During the coining season connections will be 
made by means of large-sized pipes thi'ough which 
the jMystic water (by the opening of gates in Charles- 
1o\vn)'can be carried to the top of Beacon Hill, if any 
eineigency should arise which would render it teni- 
jioiarily desirable. 

This arrangement will be benelicial to the city of 
C'harleslown as well as ourselves, 

lUgh Service. The high-service supply, which Was 



last year connected with Beacon Hill, proves entirely 
satisfactory. 

A consideiabli^ portion of teiritory in Ward 10 will 
need to be supplied by a connection with the high 
service; and at a day iiot far distant it will be neces- 
sary to add to our pumping facilities, 

IHsfrilwfiiii/ lienorroir.-!. The Beacon-Hill Reser- 
voir has not been in use during the iiast year, as the 
district which it formerly supplied it now connected 
with the high service, and the board are of the opin- 
ion that its sale can safely be made without detriment 
to the works. 

The East Boston Reset voir is in good condition. 
The South Boston Reservoir is not in perfect order, 
and within two or three years will need extensive re- 
pairs unless its use should be suspended by the in- 
troduction of high service in that locality. 

Westo-ii /)/rtsioii. This division cennprises the 
lake and all that jiortion of the works lying between 
the lake and the gate house at the Brookline Reser- 
voir, and its superintendence is in charge^of Mr. Al- 
bert Stan wood. 

The \ow stage of the water in the lake revealed the 
fact that the sea wall adjoining the gate house was 
starting from its position; a portion of the wall has 
been rebuilt in a thorough and substantial manner, 
and the balance will be rebuilt at an early day. 

In order to keep up the supply during" several 
months of the past year it has been necessary to 
))ump the water from the lake into the conduit; this 
has been done by the use of two eighteen-inch 
pumps driven by two twenty-five horse-power en- 
gines. 

The usual annual examination of the conduit has 
been omitted, on account of the scarcity of water, 

(JheKtmit Hill Renerrmr. This reservoir has been 
thoroughly tested during the past year, and fully 
moots the most sanguine" expectations of its projec- 
tors; as a storage reservoir it is invaluable. Its cost 
I'was large, vij^., $2,440,082 07; but we believe it to 
be one of the most essential features of the water 
works. The combined capacity of the two l>asitn,v-is 
7:^1 ,472,429 gallons. ,...,..,.,; 

BrnnkHiie Jicfierrmr. The building and lands about 
this reser\-oir are in good order. 

The importance of keeping our storage reservoirs 
full has prevented the cleaning out of the basin,; ^s 
was contemplated. 

Wdier licgififrar'n Deyiartment. The number iDf 
water takers now entered for the year 1872 -'is 
88,71(), an increase of 2.584 over the previous vear, • 

The number of cases in which the water has been 
turned off for nonpayment of rates during the year 
is !);-J0, of this number 7,84 have been turned <m again, 
and a balnnce of 202 still remain off, : .• 

Meters are attached to a \-arietv of establishments, 
embracing hotels, railroad stables, manufactories, 
saloons and buildings occupied by several tenants,"- 

Whole number of meters now in use, 1001. 

The number of the various kinds of water fixtures 
on the premises of water takers January 1. 1872, was 
145,780— an increase of 17,.5.52 during the'year. ■ ; 
Charles H. .\ll'en, Pres't,- 
Nathaniel J. Bratu.ee, 
George Lewis. •:• 

John A. Haven, - ■' 

LeONAED R. CtiTTER, 

Amos L. Noyes, 
Charles H Hersey. 
Ordered to be sent down. 

heauinos on orders or notice. 

The order of notice on petition of Alexander Mo*e- 
ley for leave te locate and use a steam engine and 
boiler in South street was taken up. No person ap- 
pearing in relation thereto, the report was recotn- 
niitted. 

The order of notice on petition of the Middlesex 
Railroad Company for a location of tracks on the ex- 
tension of Washington street to Haymarket square 
was taken up, 

Charles E, Power, president of the Middlesex Rail- 
road Company, appeared in behalf of tin' ]>etition, 
and stated the desii-ableness of the measure, and laid 
before the Board plans of the proposed tracks. For 
two reasons the petitions were iiresented at an early 
da.y — to prevent other companies from obtaining th'c 
privilege, and to provide that the tracks be laid when 
the grading and paving (if the extended stre(^t are 
done. The difficulties in the travel in Sudbury street 
were stated, and the iirobability of the nbandimmont 
of the Sudbury-street route -^N-as stated. • 

In further uiging the desirableness of the change 

of iHuite, he said the passengers coming into the city 

would be better accommodated in being left at .the 

■ foot of Conihill, the distance saved to the corpcira- 

tion would amount to ;^0.000 miles per annum, and 

' the cost $12,000. There was no oppo.-<ition to the 



53 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



proposed vonte that he was aware of. and some of the 
abutters whom he knew made no objection. 
The report was recommitted. 

UNFINISHED BITSINBSS. 

The following orders were severally read a second 
time and passed : 

Order to pay Frederick Jones, $.3470, for land taken 
to widen High street. 

Order to pay J. M. and P. Jones, $11,663, for land 
taken to widen High street. 

Order to pay Maria B. Frost, $82 88. for land taken 
to widen AVarren street. 

Order to pay Edward T. Mason, $90,t)40, fm' land 
taken to extend Washington street. 

Order to pay Clarissa B. and Caroline Dorr, 
$2,344 40, for land taken on River and AVasliington 
streets. Ward 16. 

Order to pay F. G. Tuckerman, $183,700, for land 
taken to extend Washington street. 

Order to pay William Minot, Jr., trustee, $6825, for 
land taken to widen Summer street. 

Order to pay W. S. Dexter et a!., trustees, $10,100, 
for land taken to widen Washington street. 

Order to pay John A. Lowell, trustee, $18,,546, for 
land taken to widen Washington street. 

Order to designate the portion of India wharf be- 
tween Broad street and Atlantic avenue as "India 
square."" 

Order authorizing general repairs on the jail dur- 
ing this year, at a cost not exceeding $5000. 

Order authorizing general repairs cm Court House 
buildings during this year, at a cost not exceeding 
$5000. 

The order appropriating the sum of $801)0 for an 
exhibition of a model schoolroom and furniture at 
the proposed Vienna Exposition was further consid- 
ered. 

Alderman Gaffleld said that while he believed that 
our school system, with all its excellences, had 
many imperfections, and that a comparison of its 
features with those of other nations such as is con- 
templated at the Vienna Exposition might enable us 
to receive as well as to impart much good, it was 
clear that the object could only be accomplished by 
National or State legislation and appropriation, or 
by private subscription. When the matter was in 
troduced to the consideration of the Committee on 
Public Instruction, the question of the legality of 
municipal appropriations for this purpose was 'not 
raised. When it was afterwards raised and settled by 
the adverse opinion o1 the City Solicitor, received a 
iew minutes before the last meeting of the Board, he 
hesitated about presenting the order at all. and did so 
ouly in courtesy to the committee, and to the worthy 
member of the School Board, who advocated the 
measure. AlthoiTgh it may be within the memory of 
man5' now living, that expenditures, sometimes quite 
large, have been made for various purposes, with or 
without the opinion of the Solicitor, which did not 
come within the strict letter of the law. yet he cer- 
tainly did not wish, especially in this season of our 
city's trial and necessarily increasing burdens, to add 
to the list of wrong or illegal precedents, and he 
therefore moved the indefinite postponement of the 
order. 

The motion was carried. 

TAPEBS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

The Auditor's monthly exhibit for February was 
ordered to be placed on file. 

The petitions of Jane Logue and of John Keeuan 
were referred, in concurrence. 

The following order was passed in concurrence: 

Report and order to pay th(^ Assistant Port Physi- 
cian $700, for extra services last year. 

The order for Mayor to petition the (General Court for 
ana act to take the low territory, bounded by North- 
ampton, Eustis, Albany and Washington streets, and 
to raise the grade thereof, was laid on the table. 

The order for Legislative Committee to apply to 
the General Court for an act placing the licensing of 
stables with the City Council, instead of the Board of 
Aldermen, being under consideration. Alderman Gaf- 
fleld expressed the belief that the proposed enlarge- 
ment of the power of licensing stables would inter- 
fere with the business, and moved an indefinite post- 
ponement of the order. 

Alderman Sayward stated that the order was almost 
the unanimous desire of the committee, at whose re- 
quest it was reported; yet he was of the belief that 
the business could be done with more expedition and 
at less expense under the present method. 

The motion to indefinitely postpone was carried. 

pBDERS RELATING TO REFRESHMENTS AND CARRIAGE 
HIRE. 

The order for the Auditor to submit a monthly 
statement of the expenditures on account of refresh- 



ments for standing or special committees of the City 
Council, or either branch, came up, amended, so as 
to read as follows: 

Ordered, That from and after this date, no comiiiil- 
tee sliall approve, nor shall the Auditor audit, nor 
.shall the Treasurer pay any bill contracted by any 
committee of the City Council, or of either branch 
or any member thereof, or any bill contracted by any 
member of the City Council for refreshments of any 
name or nature, or for carriage hire, unless said bill 
is contracted under a special vote passed prior to con- 
tracting the same. 

Alderman Clark said. I am most hap])y to concur 
wirh the (^ommon Council, and think that the pres- 
ent moment is one which will do uf honor and give 
to the community unusual satisfaction. It is a step 
in the right direction — one which I have long desired, 
hut did hot suppose it could he so saccessfully car- 
ried out at the present time. To the Common Coun- 
cil is due the credit of inaugurating the abolition of 
the last vestiges of an annual exi)eiiditure which a 
few years asro was a just sul)ji'ct of complaint. The 
time is favorable and the reasons most urgent for 
adopting this order. We have no money to waste 
which can possibly be saved and put to good uses. 
The large amount which it is absolutely necessary 
we should spend in street improvements, in in- 
creasing and making as efficient as possible 
the Fire Department, the necessary increase of 
the i)olice force to an extent that will give full and 
ample security to life and property in every section 
of the city — will increase the rate of taxation to a 
\ery large extent. We have already created within 
the past 3'ear a Board of Health, which will add fiom 
$2.1,000 to $:«,000 to the annual exi)rnditures. This 
new department is .--o vital to the people that if the 
expenditun^ were four times that amount, the citizens 
would willingly meet the expenditure. Now if this 
order is adopted, enough will be saved to tlie city 
treasury to run the entire Department of Health for 
a year to come. There is no step we can take that 
will be so .-iatisfactory to the public and that will re- 
flect so much honor on ourselves as by adopting this 
order. 

Alderman Power said it would be impossible for 
committees to discharge their duties without proper 
modi^s of ccuiveyance, and moved to strike out from 
the order so much as related to carriage hire. 

Alderman Clark hoped the motion would not pre- 
vail, since as a member of the Committee on Com- 
mon he could proceed in the street cars to every pub- 
lic square and common in the city, and he was ready 
to pay the fare of five cents himself, and the same 
was true in regard to the Committee on Streets, 
There was not the slightest reason for any change. 
The Commiin Council were in full harmony with the 
Board, and he had no doubt they passed the order in 
good faith, and he would concur in the same manner 
In which it came down to us. They would not do 
justice to themselves if they refrained from doing it. 

Alderman Gaffield said that nothing had been more 
refreshing than the action of the Council at its last 
meeting. " It voices that perfect and harmonious ac- 
cord which ought alwaj's to prevail between both 
branches of the City Government and the Individ- 
ual members, and it removes all embarrassment from 
the minds of the chairmen of the committees. 
Whereas some might have been iu doubt, on neces- 
sai'v and proper occasions, as to the propriety of in- 
viting their associates on laborious committees to 
partake of a reasonable dinner, or a cup of tea, 
the question has been most happily settled 
by the nearly unanimous vote of our breth- 
ren of the other branch. And now that the 
matter has been sufliciently ventilated in a generally 
good-natured discussion in both boards, and is fully 
understood by all, I move the indefinite postpone- 
ment of the whole subject, leaving it to be regulated, 
as it ought to be, by the common sense, integrity and 
manhood of the members of both boards. 

NotwithstaiKliiig the votes which have been passed. 
I have no fear that any chairman will act in other 
than a liberal and honorable manner, and from my 
knowledge of human nature. I do not think that many 
ni embers of either bi'auch will have strength to refuse 
an invitation, or oppose a motion to take from the 
table, pleasantly discuss, or finally to dispose of any 
refreshments which may be laid before them for con- 
sideration in a reasonable manner, and on proper oc- 
casions. He moved an indefinite postponement of 
the whole matter. 

Alderman Sayward remarked upon the change 
which had occurred among some of the Aldermen, 
and said he should vote for the inconsistent. He 
supposed the Alderman had free tickets on horse 
railroads, and it would not cost him anything to ride 
to various portions of the city. He thought it would 
be better to pass the order and let hun send his tick- 
ets to the Common Council. 



FEBRUARY 10 



1873 



54- 



AI(l(!rinrtn Clark said he wap willing to pay for all 
IiIk l.ickcl.H. 

AldrniiMii Saywnrd said ho was redy to pay his 
own ciiriianv liirc, kul after reading tlie roiuarks of 
sonic of llic iiicnibers of the tlonnuon C'ouiieil. par- 
lienlarly tliose of j\Ir. J'iekering and Mr. Dean, gcu- 
tlenien of this Hoard ought to he ashamed of them- 
selves. 

The Chair stated the qnesl.ion to he on the amend- 
ment. 

Alderman Gafheld raised a question thai the mo- 
tion to indefiiHtely postjicme was llrst in ordi-r. 

The Chair read the will of the Board, and stated the 
question again, and Mr. Gatlield appealed from the 
decision of the Chair. 

Tlu' decision of the Chair was sustained, and Iht- 
quc'sfion was taken on the amendment, to strike out 
so much of the order as relates to carriage hire. 

The motion was carried, by a vote of 8 to 4, as fol- 
lows: 

Yeas — Bigelow, Brown, Emery. CTaftield. Cihson, 
Ilulhert, Power, Quincy. 

Nays — Clark, Cutter. Sayward, Stehhins. 

Alderman (iaflicld renewed the motion for an in- 
defuiite iiostponement. 

Alderman Clark said he hoped the Board would not 
lose the effect of all their talk, and he did not believe 
in an indefinite postponement. 1'he other branch 
had taken oiu' slep beyond the Board in measures 
of ccunomv, and the Board should not be outdone. 
There would be a saving of !j;-j.''),000 or P0,00()— enough 
to pay for the running of the Board of Health — in 
wliicli action the Council was honest, and it was the 
duty of the Board to c(mcur. The members of the 
Council meant what tln^y said, <)nd if thej; were hon- 
est and earnest in tlieir duty to their constituents and 
themselves the present year, they should show that 
they mean reform. 

Alderman Oattield did not think that there would 
be any taking of hack tracks. The moral effect of 
the discussion would be good, as shown on the pub- 
lic and on tin; City Cotnicil, and it .should go no fur- 
ther. They should now rely on the integrity, manhood 
and good sense of both Ijoards, and in this respect 
they would he sustained by the integrity, manhood, 
and good sense of the community. 

The motion for iudelinlte postponement was lost, 
by a vote .5 to T, as follows: 

Yeas — Cutter, Gatlield, Gibson, Sayward, Stebbins. 

Nays — Bigelow, Brown, Clark, Emery, Hulbert, 
Sayward, Quincy. 

Alderuiau Sayward moved to lay the order on the 
table. 

Alderman Clark opposed the motion. 

Alderman Sayward inquircjd if the motion was de- 
batable. 

The Chairman replied that it was not. 

Alderman Clark asked for the yeas and nays on the 
motion, which were ordered. 

The motion was lost, by a vote of 3 to 9, as fol- 
lows : 

Yeas— Gatlield, Sayward, Stebbins. 

Nays — Bigelow. Brown, Clark, Cutter, Emery, Gib- 
son, Hulbert, Power, Quincy. 
The question recurring on the passage of the order^ 

Alderman Quincy hoped that tlie Board would con- 
cur, and thereby put an end for the present to what 
threatened to become an undignified controversy be- 
tween the two branches, although he regretted that 
the other branch had seen fit to assume the attitude 
they had. The order passed by the Board contem- 
plated the reasonable use of a privilege which the 
public expected would be soused, but which it could 
not but see by published figures had in times past 
been unreasonably abused. The responsibility for 
such abiTse, in his opinion, rested far more heavily 
upon the upper branch of former city governments 
who should liave discouraged and cliecked it. than 
upon the lower branch. It was the upper branch of 
past years upon whom the order most severely re- 
flected, and yet the present lower -.jraneh had seen fit 
to regard flie same as a vote of censure or rebukejto 
themselves, and had replied, in st;bstan(:e, "'We will 
agree to no such check as you propose, but we will 
abolish the whole system, the unreasonable, the reason- 
able and the necessary, including even carriage hire for 
committees on duty, and see how long you will stand 
that." And prominent members of the branch as- 
suming this attitude, criticised severely the action of 
the Board as nndignitied and childish. It did not 
comport with the dignity of this body to retort accu- 
sations, and therefore the Alderman though tthat the 
matter of dignity or childishness might safely be left 
to the decision of the public. The adoption of this 
Order might be followed by some inconveniences, but 
he relied on the good sense of the other branch to 
perceive ere long that no insinuation against their 
body was intended, and that then they would agree 
to put the matter on the footing desired by the 



Board, viz., to adopt a check against abuses, and to 
leave unl(Mi<lied a. r(uisonable jjrivilege, which the 
public are willing enough that- the (^ity (iovcrnment 
should enioy. 

Alderman' Clark regretted that they did not concur 
with the other branch in the passjige of the order as 
it came from them, and moved a reconsideration of 
the vote striking out so much of the order as related 
to carriage hire. 

Alderman Power hoped the motion would Kot pre- 
vail. As a matter of economy the interests of the 
city required the amendment to be made, for busi- 
m^ss could not be done unless some mode of convev- 
ance is furnished to comtnittees, who are often I'e- 
quired to go where there are no horse railroads. 

Alderman Sayward opposed tlie reconsideration, 
for it was necessary that carriages should be fur- 
nished to committees in doing the public business. 
This had been an undignified controversy, and would 
not have been brought up by those who had had ex- 
perience in city matters. There were but few per- 
sons who objected to an expenditure for such pur- 
poses, and the longer the debate the lietter it would 
he. It looked undignified in an editor who had held 
a seat in the Board, and had partaken freely in its 
ex enditures, to give his views as that of the public 
sentiment. Aldermen had spoken of improprieties 
of past governments, but no objections could be 
made against the last year's government, whicli was 
economical and had an economical chairman. He 
hoped the reconsideration would not prevail, but if 
it passed it would not be by his vote. 

Alderman Hulbert did not deem the matter less 
trivial than it was last week, and as to knowledge of 
it from experience in the City Ctovernment, he only 
spoke from what gentlemen of past city govern- 
ments had told him. The ofl'ering of his'order was 
not personal, iMit was offered only so that it might 
be understood what was to be tlie practice of the 
Government. He had no person in mind, but a re- 
gard to the standing of members of the Goverinnent. 
These things were well known on the part of the Gov- 
ernment for years, and were the subject of public 
scandal. II might be egotistical ami self-willed on 
his part, but he believed the cn-der offered by him to 
be a proper one, and whether others believed' it to be 
an error, he should vote for the order. It was enough 
to show that there had been a public scandal, and he 
believed in the Scripture that they should provide 
things honest in the sight of all men'. 

In what he did he was speailng for the good name 
of the whole Council. He had no wish to conceal 
anything nor had he any personal plans to carry out. 
He voted for the amendment, because he could not 
give a good reason why provision should not be made 
for caariage hire. There was no danger on that 
point; the trouble was not there, but in relation to 
refreshments. TVil' matter was worthy of their at- 
tention, and some progress had been niade. but if it 
was believed to be best not to allow carriages he 
could go afoot ail the year. 

Alderman Sayward .said he should judge from 
offering the (U'der, that it was designed as a reflec- 
tion on the last City Government. There were but 
four of this Board' here last year, and half of the 
Council, and it looked like an imputation upon them. 
He was astonished at the course of the gentleman 
who was here last year and was so strong an advo- 
cate of the order, and it would have beeii better to 
have adopted the first Older offered, which was the 
best one, because it might have lieen better for the 
families of the members. 

Alderman Clark believed that carriage hire might 
be as much of an abase as dinners, and it would be 
an expensive job where as many as eight are provid- 
ed for. It was a large expense every year, ancl could 
be dispensed with. Why not, tlien,' concur with the 
Council? After so coinpiete a ventilalion of the sub- 
ject, they .should not take a back step, for to pass the 
order as it came from the Council will give complete 
satisfaction. They have improved upon us, and let 
us follow their .-example, and save the outcry against 
Ihe lavish expenditure of the City Government. 

.Alderman Sayward clid not believe there was any 
danger of carriage hire, for in his own case he did 
not approve of a bill if he did not order carriages. 
How could the bills be paid for if the chairman of the 
committee did not approve of them? How could they 
get along without carriages, and how ride to distant 
portions of the city where the cars do not run? He 
had two horses, but he could not provide them for 
the use of the city. The citizens and the public had 
no objection to the payment of hire of cai'i'iages, nor 
of any reasonable amount of expenditure for refresh- 
ments. 

It was not to be supposed they came here for the 
sake of dinners, and he did not act for the sake of get- 
ting votes, for he was not a candidate for Alderman 
or the Common Council or for Mayor, as it was about 



55 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



time lor .some to be thinking of tliat office. He was 
disposed to be fiiir and honest, and if the citiKeus 
wished them to do liusiness, tliey must liave carriages 
to get about in. Othtir Aldermen are often ready to 
ride, if some, other committees famish carriages. 
This Board he supposed was made up the same as 
others, and some expenditures of this kind would be 
needed. . . , : 

Alderman Gaflield stated that he did not believe it 
_ to be vvioug to require the city to pay for carriage 
hire.. arid occasions must occur in which reasonable 
. refresUnuuits should be provided. It was not the use 
but the abuse of the practice which had been the sub- 
ject of complaint. The question had been brought 
up to check abuses. The order had been discussed 
g oodnatiu'edly, and tlie other branch had adopted a 
substitute in a kind of joke, and had sent it to them. 
He was sorry any feeling had been shown this after- 
noon, and hoped that l)etvveen l)oth boards they 
ivould come to an agreement to reform abuses. The 
. discu.ssion had done good, and it was not child's 
play. The remarks in the other branch did not dis- 
turb his dignity. He hoped some one would mo\e 
to reconsider the order, and it ought to lit indeiinite- 
. ly post])oned. 

Aldernran C'lark believed if some .'ii;:J5,0(lO or $30,000 
. could be .saved, it was an important subject. He had 
; no doubt the Council acted in good faitii. So far as 
related to carriage hire, arrangements could be made 
. beforehand if they were needed, and t bere was no 
reason why the order should not be passed as it was 
in the Council. Tlicre was no subject more deserv- 
ing of serious consideration than this was, and the 
responsibility rests upon this Board. They were as 
much to blame as were members of the Council. No 
doubt he did his part toward public e.-cpenditure. He 
should be mortified should the order be postponed, 
but he hoped the reconsideration in relation to car- 
riages would prevail. 

Alderman Sayward suggested a ditticulty in rela- 
tion to obtaining carrageVwhere one was authorized, 
and should not "prove to he enough, in which case 
it might be necessary to postpone thi; action of a 
committee for a week. 

Alderman Quincy objected to indefinite postpone- 
ment because the order was necessary to cheek 
abuses. It would do for the present as it is. 

The cpiestion was taken on the motion of Alderman 
Clark to reconsider the adoption of tln^ amendment 
in striking out carriage hire. 

The motion was lost by a vote of 1 to 11, as fol- 
lows: 

Yeas — Clark. 

Nays— Bigelow, Brown, Cutter, Emery, (Jaftield. 
(Jibson, Hulbert, Power, CJ.uiucy, Sayward, Steb- 
bins. 

Alderman Gaffield believed the abuses complained 
of would be checked should the order be indetinitely 
l)ostponed, and the matter left to the good sense and 
, vutegrity of the City Council. 

Afderuian Clark said he was astonished at the 
course of the Alderman, after condemning, as he did. 
'the follies and vices of past city governments, now 
to wish for an indefinite postponement of the order. 
. Such a course put back the cause of reform twenty 
years, The public have become imbued with the 
.idea that this is an extravagant Government, and as 
he believed the Council did not talk for buncombe in 
this matter, they should concur with them. He de- 
sired to inform the Alderman from Ward 10 (.Say- 
ward) that he was not talkmg for buncombe; he did 
not did not desire office in the future; what be de- 
sired to do was to fill his present position well, and 
, at the present time we should retrench in every pos- 
sible manner. 

' Alderman Sayward replied that he said nothing 
about buncombe, and was surprised to hear the Al- 
derman on the other side refer to members of the 
Board by name: that that was more like a new mem- 
ber than one who had had his experience here. He 
thought it was hardly courteous to call such names. 

AlcTerman Clark said he did not call that gentleman 
Buncombe. 

Alderman Sayward replied that if the Aderman 
bad called him by that name he should have been 
xlelighl;cd. but he called him by name in the discus- 
sion. 

Alderman Power helieved the Council had not 

can.ght them in a irap, for if they mean business they 

: will concur in the amendment. The interests of the 

city could not be subserved unless modes of convey- 

jauce were provided. He hojied the order would not 

be postponed, but passed. 

The question was stated to be on the passage of the 
order, and it was passed, by a ^-ote of eight to four, 
.as follows: 

Yeas— Bigelow, Brown, Clark, Emery, Hulbert, 
Power, Q.uincy, Sayward. 
'. Nays— Cutter, Gaflield, Gibson, Slebbins. 



KEl'ORTS OF COSIMITTEES. 

xVlderman Sayward, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of licenses, rs folliws: A. 
A. Noyes, to give a concert at Treniont Temple Feb. 
13; John M. Watson, Browne & Cook, and Henry 
Fall, as auctioneers; also to sundry persons as vict- 
uallers, wagon licenses, and for billiard saloons, and 
for transfer of wagon license. Severally siccepted. 

Alderman Power, 'from the Committee on Steam 
Engines, reported in favor of granting the several pe- 
titions for the location and use of steam engines and 
Doilers of Schnetzer & Abendroth, 11 Chslrlestown 
street; McCready & Stearns, g'.l Court strbet; R. B. 
Lincoln & Son, on .^Iger sti cet, near Dorchester 
street; Gai-ew & Walsh, on wharf on East Dover 
street; and no action necessary on petition of Denni- 
son & Co.. for leave to locate and use a steam engine 
and boiler at 1.5 Suffolk place. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Sayward, from the C(nnmittee on 
Health, reported in favor of stables, as follows: Nay- 
lor & Co., to occupy a wooden stable for twenty-five 
horses on Dorchester avenue, opposite Norway Iron 
Works: James H. Boyham, to erect a stable for two 
horses corner of Tremont and Whitney streets: 
Adams Thompson, to occupy and alter a stable for 
thirty horses on Northampton street; M. N. Brittan. 
to occupy a wooden stable for two horses on Marston 
avenue, to be of brick, on the northerly corner of the 
lot: George W. Dyer, to occupy a wooden stable for 
two horses on Pleasant street, corner of Savin-Hill 
avenue; Edwin O. Presby, to occupy a wooden stable 
for two horses on Blue-Hill avenue, near Moreland 
street; A. B'irth, to erect a stable on Atlantic avenue, 
to conform to the requirements of the Inspector of 
Buildings. Severally accepted. 

The committee also reported leave to withdraw on 
petition of C. O. Smith, for leave to erect stalls in an 
old building on Gold street for six horses. Accept- 
ed. 

Alderman Gibson, from the Committee on Police, 
to whom were referred the appointments of Police 
Officers made by the Mayor, made a report in favor of 
the confirmation of the appointments, as follows: 

Police Officers — Bernard Johnson, Oscar M. Well- 
man, Christopher White, William J. Condon, Burt 
tJilson, Thonuis Sbehan, Harrison Wilder, Jr., George 
AI. Lovering, Daniel E. Curran, Joseph Brown, Harry 
P. Hersey, Benjamin S. Hill, John H. Shaw. Lewis F. 
Lei.ghton, William Burke, Frederic T. Harvey, Har- 
lan P. Paige, Daniel A. Ritter, Ira B. Perry. 
The several aijpointments were confirmed. 
Alderman Brown, from the Joint Standing Com- 
mittee on tlie Assessors' Department, made a report 
recommending the election of the following-named 
persons as First Assi,stant Assessors: 

Benjamin F. Palmer, WMlliam J. Ellis, James Hea- 
ly. Michael Carney. Theophilus Buri', John M. Ma- 
guire, P. Amb'-ose Youu,Lf, Joseph L. Drew, Charles 
K. Jackson, Edwin B. Spinney, Edward F. Rohinson, 
Ge(n'ge F. Williams, Otis Rich, William Gtallagher, 
George F. Davis, L. Foster Morse, Isaac F. Atwood, 
Phineas B. Smith. William Withington, John L. 
Brighan*!, Henry Pierce. John H. Giblm, William H. 
Cundy. Thaddeus (iould, Andrew J. Browne, Horalio 
N. llolbrook. Charles Nowell 

'I'he report was accepted, when the Board proceed- 
ed to an election, with the following result: 

Whole number of votes ; 11 

Kecessary to a choice (i 

Ben ianihi F. Palmer : 11 

William J. Kllis 11 

.Tames Healy 'T . 

Michael Carney 11 

'rhei)i>liilus Isfirr lit 

.Idlm ,M. .Masuire 11 

I', .\nibrose Youua 10 

.I<is:>ph L. Drew, .■^. i» 

( liarles K, .lacUson 11 

Kilv.hi IJ. Spiiiuey 11 

Edward F. Kobiiison u 

Georae F. Williams 11 

Otistiicli ■: 

"William Gallaeher 11 

' Geonae F. Da\ Is !i 

"L. Foster Morse 11 

Isaac F. Atwood 11 

. ,., Phlueas B. Smith 11 

. "NVilliain Withington 11 

'. John L. Biifiliain 11 

'Hciir\' Pierce 11 

Jolm' H. Giblin 11 

William H. Cinidv : T 

Tluuideus Gould." H 

. Andrew J. Browne lu 

,, Horatio iST. HolbroolJ 'i 

Charles Xowell 10 

' James Deniiie 10 

■ A. (i. "Wynian (i 

J. K. C:ri)wlev ij 

.M. J. Creak.: 1 

The committee reported that thirty persons re- 
ceived ^otes enough, three more than were required 
to be elected. " 



FEBRUARY 10 



1873 



56 



Aldcniiaii Stpbbins, of tl>p coiiinii I loo, stated thai: 
Olio hiillol ooiitiiiiiiiiL; nioro than tho nunilior of oan- 
diihilos was thrown out. Tf ooimtod it would ix'wv 
Messrs. Iloaly, Cundy and l?ioh ono inoro voto, when 
there would lie an oxooss of ono person oleoted. 

On motion of Alderman Hrown of tlie oonimittee, 
tho twonty-four having the highest number of votes 
above lii'i'i-n were declared to be elected, and tho 
Board jjroeeeded to tho olocti<m of three more. 

On the second ballot William H. Cundy was oleot- 
ed, receiving S votes, and A. (i. \\'yman was also 
elected by 7 votes, seven being required for a choice. 
and Otis Rich and J. K. Crowley had ti (■aoli. M. .1. 
Croak 1, II. :N". Holbrook "2, Thaddous(iould, Andrew 
J. Browne, 1 each. 

On the third ballot for one Assessor there was no 
choice. Otis Rich receiving r> votes. M. .1. Croak A. J. 
K. Crowley 5. 11. N. Holl)fook 1. 

On tho fourth and fifth ballots tho votes were tho 
same: Otis Rich having fi, M. J. Croak a, .). K. Crow- 
ley -2, H. N. Holtirookl. 

On Ihe sixth ballot Otis Rich was elected by a vote 
of 7 to :! for J. K. Crowley, and one each for M. 
J. Croak and 11. N. llolbrooli. 

Alderman (4ibson, from the committee to nom- 
inate Sui)orintondents of Bridges, made a report 
recommending Iho election of Reuben B. Wendell as 
Superintendent of Maverick- treet Bridpe. 

The report was accepted, and the Board proceeded 
to an election, resulting in the choice of the nominee. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of AldernKin Clark — 

Ordered, That the Chairman of tho Board of Alder- 
men be authorized to approve bills for expenses in- 
curred by the Board of Aldermen, the standing com- 
mittees of the Board of Aklermeii not having charge 
of any appropriation of money, also by inclividual 
members of the Board of Aldermen while engaged in 
the discliarge of official duty; the amount of said 
bills to be charged to the appropriation for Contin- 
gent Expenses of the Board of Aldermen. 

Ordered, That there he paid to John Coliamore the 
sum of $14.7n8, for land taken and all damages occa- 
sioned by the widening of Washington street, by a 
resolve of the Board of Street Commissioners, passed 
December Iti, 1872, upon the usual conditions; the 
same to bo charged to the Burnt District Loan. 

On motion of Alderman Quincy — 

Ordered, That his honor the Mayor cause tho flags 
to be displayed on the public buildings and grounds, 
and a national salute to be tired at East Boston, 
South Boston, the city proper, Roxbury and Dor- 
chester, at noon on the -iid of February instant, in 
commemoration of the birthday of George Washing- 
ton: the expense to be charged to the appropriation 
for Incidental Expenses. 

On motion of Alderman Gibson — 
• Ordered, That the Commissioners npon West Bos- 
ton and Craigie's Bridges be and they are hereby au- 
thorized and^instructed. in behalf ofthe city, to peti- 
tion the General Court for authority to reconstruct 
■and widen Craigie's Bridge to a width not less than 
sixty-fonr feet, and to take such land, buildings and 
wharves and other property as may be found requi- 
site or convenient to accommodate such reconstruc- 
tion and widening. 

REFRESHMENTS BY BOARDS OP DIRECTORS AND 
OTHERS. 

Alderman Clark oiierod tho following order: 

Ordered, Tliat on and aftoi' the passage of this order 
no bill shall lie allowed or paid for rofroshments 
furnished directly or indirectly to any boards of 
directors or trustees or heads of departments elect- 
ed by the City Council, unless said expendituros have 
been incurred under a sjiocial order of the ( 'ity Coun- 
cil. 

Alderman Sayward said ho had hoped this business 
of refreshments had been tiiiishod up. and asked if it 
was not so. 

Alderman Clark replied thai the whole question of 
economy in tho City (iovornmenr was involved. As 
it is now the diroolors of any board can provide re- 
freshnionls as often as they see tit, and this action 
was nocessavy to com]>loto the order relating to ro- 
freslunonts. They should show the community 
they are as desiroiis of contributing as far as in their 
power to lessening the expenses of tho Government. 

Alderman Sayward said it might be right, yet it aji- 
peared to him to be ridiculous, and hojiod he would 
go on that it might sooner come to an end. lie 
would like to know what particular Board it was 
aimed at. 

Alderman Clark replied that it referred to no par- 
ticular Board, but it was known that some boards 
dine, go out sailing, and engage in other matters at 
the city's exi>onse. If such things were necessary, 
they should be provided for. 



Alderman Sayward said lie happened to bo a mem- 
lier of ono board, which sometimes went to Deer 
Island, and when they had a dinner, as Iheyninst 
have one somewhere. Three or four times a year 
they give excursions to patients in the lunatic hos- 
l)ital, and the Alderman would do well to see them; 
I he inmates of the House of Reformation were also 
laken on excursions. This order appeared to be 
more ridiculous I ban ever, and he moved its indefinite 
postponement, but sub.seques.tly withdrew it. 

Alderman Gibson thought the lirst thing in order in 
the matter would he to introduce an order of inquiry 
w iK'thor there wore any abuses in exiienditures by 
such boards, lie did not expect that outsiders would 
1io willing to work for nothing in tho inlorests of the 
oitv. Tho taxjiayers could not ob,]ect to reasonable 
expense, for if they did the sooner ho knew it the 
liotter. and he w onld leave them. An order might be 
adopted to inquire into excesses, but otherwise if tax- 
payers complain let them cpmplain. If there are. 
abuses let them he known, but until ascertained there 
was no need of complaining. 

.Mderman Quincy thought it was sufticiont for them 
to keep their own skirts, clear, and let others take 
the responsibility for their action. He hoped the 
order would be iiidetinitely postponed. 

Alderman Sayward said his intention was to I6t th« 
order be passed, but without his vote. 

Alderman Gatlield raised the question whether they 
had any control of appropriations after they left 
them. He hoped the order would be laid over and 
the opinion of the City Solicitor be obtained. He 
should approve of the indefinite postponement. 

Alderman Quincy renewed the motion for indefr 
nite postponement. 
Alderman Gatfield favored the motion. 
Alderman Pow or agreed with Alderman Gibson In 
relation to this mattei-, yet the measure of economy 
should not be confined "to the Board of Aldermen. If 
they were not worthy of trust, directors of public in- 
stitutions and other boards, to prevent jealousy and 
secure harmony, should all be served alike. 

Alderman Sayward Nvished to know if it included 
the Mayor, as it should include every one connected 
with the (iovernment. 

Alderman Clark said the Mayor was more likely to 
entertain the City Government than to be entertained 
by the city. The Board of Directors should be put 
upon the' same level with the City Council. If the 
Directors at large were not ,villiiig to serve under 
such restrictions, there were plenty to be had in their 
places. It was but ,iust and reasonable. 

Alderman Sayward said if others in offlcewere not 
to be trusted,' the Mayor could not be. He did not 
doubt the disposition of the Mayor to entertain the 
City Government, and the Alderman opposite could 
also afford to. But those insinuations and orders 
were perfectly ridiculous, yet he hoped the order 
would pass. 

Alderman Clark said he had made no insinuations, 
for this was a matter of business, to carry out what 
he believed to be right. 

Alderman Sayward admitted that there were no 
insinuations, biit plain language. 

Alderman Gibson said if this goes on, when the 
salary bill comes up, they would wish to have every 
one do business for nothing. There was no need .of 
their acting as guardians, but it was the excesses- of 
committees they wore to guard against. In all the 
expenditures of the throe years he had been in the 
Board, he was not ashaniecl of his record. 

The question was stated to boon the indefinite 
postponemont of the order. 

Alderman Gibson wished to be excused from vot- 
ing as an interested party, acting upon boards to be 
affected by the order. 

Alderman Sayward also asked to be excused, for 
the same reason. 

Alderman Stolibins said ho w'as on two boards, and 
should also be excused if others were. 

Alderman Power made a statement that hoalsow-as 
on the Board of the City Hospital. 

Alderman Quincy said if they wore inlerested, 
then all tho Aldoi'inen were interested on tho action 
which had been laken relating to the Board. 

Alderman Emery believed there should be none ex- 
cused. 

The motions to excuse Aldermen Gibson and Say 
ward were lost. 

Tho motion for indefinite i)ostponement w-as car- 
ried by a vote of 7 to 5, as follows: 

Vea's— Bigelow, Cutter, Emory, Gaflield. Gibson, 
Quincy, Sayward. 
Nays— Bi-own, Clark, Hnlbort, Power. Stebbins. 

TRANSFER OF Al'PUOPUl ATIONS. 

The Commitlee on Finance, to whom were referred 
the re])ort of the Committor' on Printing and the 
communication of the Board of Trustees of the City 



57 



BOARD OF AL33ERMEN. 



Hospital, severally asking for addifional appropria- 
tions, reported tlie accompanying order granting the 
requests, to which is appended the authority annual- 
ly given to the Auditor of Accoimts for making the 
necessary transfers for closing the ftnancial year: 

Ordered, That the Auditor of Accounts he and he 
herehy is authorized to transfer from the appropria- 
tion for Public Lands to tliat for Printing. $5000; 
from that for Widening Tremout street. $551X1. and for 
Widening Streets $6000, to that for City Hospital. 

Also, That the Auditor of Accounts be, and he 
hereby is authorized to make such transfers of ap- 
propriations as are required to make up deficiencies 
in other appropriations and such others as may be 
necessary in closing the business of the financial 
year which terminates April .'iO, 1873. 

Alderman Hulbert asked for an explanation of the 
proposed authority to the Auditor to make transfers^ 
of appropriations, not believing in any such meas- 
ures except for specific purposes, so authorized. He 
pioved to strike out the last clause of the order. 

Alderman Gafiield \va^ satisfied with the measure 
a,s in accordance with the usual practice and neces- 
sary, but believed the order might lie over, that the 
Alderman may satisfy himself with its necessity. 

Alderman Power opposed the laying over of the or- 
iipr, there being a necessity for the transfer of api)ro- 
■priations specified, that required for printing being in 
consequence of the large documents printed. So far 
as related to the Auditor, it was well known there was 
nomore trustworthy man in the City Hall, and the 
authority to make transfers was simply for small snms 
to enable him to meet deficiencies and settle up ac- 
counts for the year. 

Alderman Gibson believed there might be some 
economy commenced at the City Hospital. 
. Alderman Hulbert said he did not raise The ques- 
tion of the integrity of any one, but he could not 
consistently vote for the order. 

Alderman Sayward believed the order to be right, 
but did not object to the obtaining of information by 
the Alderman. 

Alderman Clark explained that the result, in regard 
to appropriations, would not he affected, the object 
beiriCT to enable the Auditor to balance his books. 
. Alderman Power said it would be l)etter to give the 
aiithority to make the transfer than to borrow money 
to meet deficiencies in appropriations. He had confi- 
■dence in the judgment of the Auditor. 

Alderman Sayward said the autiicu-izing of trans- 
fers would save the trouble of passing different orders 
to meet the dift'erent cases of deficiencies which might 
come up. Tire objection made might be got over by 
passing the first part of the order, and letting the 
other lie over. 

The order was passed with an amendment to strike 
out the last clause of it. 

Alderman Clark moved to take from the table the 
order for the Mayor to petition the General Court for 
an act to take the low territory bounded by North- 
ampton, Eustis, Albany and Washington streets, and 
to raise the grade thereof. 

, Some debate ensued in relation to the necessity of 
early action to secure legislation, upon the urgency of 
the measure, and whether the city was liable for the 
nuisance which it was alleged existed in consequence 
of the condition of the land. 

Alderman Gibson believed the owners of the terri- 



tory should be compelled to fill up the land, and not 
require the city to do it, and get the benefit of the 
rise. 

Alderman Gafiield stated that some action was 
taken several years ago, in ordering the owners of 
the land to abate the nuisance by filling it up. 

Aklennan Clark said there was no law to compel 
the filling up of the land, hut there should he, for 
the smallpo.K was not much worse. 

Alderman Sayward believed the Board of Health 
had power to abate the nnisance caused by the condi- 
tion of the land, and charge the expense to the own- 
ers. 

Alderman Power doubted the power of the Board 
of Health, if the City Council had not the power. 

Alderman Gaffield stated that, as the matter came 
before a committee upon which he \\as, he would 
look into it and report at an early day. 

The motion to take from the table was withdrawn. 

METROPOLITAN RAILROAD STABLE. 

Alderman Sayward, from the Committee on Health 
and Streets on the part of the Board of Aldermen, to 
whom was referred, as a part of the unfinished busi- 
ness of last year, the order in relation to the location 
of the Metropolitan Horse Railroad Company's sta- 
ble at the corner of Shavvmut avenue and Bartlett 
street, made a report recommending the passage of 
the accompanying order: 

Ordered^ That the stable which the Metropol- 
itan Railroad Company was aathorized to build 
on its lot of land, at the corner of Shawmut 
avenue and Bartlett street, by an order of 
the Board of Aldermen, approved October 29, 
1872, be located on any portion of said land 
which is distant at least one hundred feet from any 
public street or way. 

Alderman Power wished to know whether the pro- 
posed location of the stable was on the line of St. 
James street, as proposed to he extended. 

Alderman Sayward replied that there was no ex- 
tension of St. James street, and he could not give the 
information asked for. 

The debate was continued as to the understanding 
in relation to the location of the proposed stable by 
the last Board of Aldermen. 

Alderman Power wished further to know whether 
the location wmild interfere with the extension of St. 
James street, if determined upon, and he hoped the 
order would lie over. 

Alderman Sayward stated that the railroad com- 
pany bought the land for a stable, and had been 
hindered in building it hj'the action of the last Board 
of Aldermen. Should St. James street be extended, 
it could be done as in the case of other streets, by 
the removal of buildings if in the way, but this com- 
pany should not he further delayed in building on 
the possibility of extending a street. 

Alderman Gibson advocated the passage of the 
order, believing the company to be right in asking for 
better terms, if the last Government turned the 
screws too tightly. 

Alderman Quincy believed the order should go 
over, members of the last Board giving diametrically 
opposite views at to the understanding upon which 
the company were to build their stable. 

The order was laid on the table. 

Adjourned, 



58 



BOARD OF ALDERMEISr. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Board of Aldermen, 

FRBOTIARY 1 a, 1.S78. 



A special meeting of tlie Board of Aidermen was 
held at one o'clock tins afternoon. Mayor Pierce 
presiding. 

The Mayor stated as the object of the meeting 
action npon the subject of widenina; Lincoln street. 

WIOENINfi OP LINCOLN STREET. 

A resohe and oider were received from the Street 
Commissioners, pioviding lor the widening of Lin- 
coln street, near Summer street, by taking land of 
several parties, amounting to 11 1.3 square feet, at an 
estimated expense of .|;22,'iK50 50. 

The several items of expense are as follows: 

William Boynton, 115 Sinnmer street, 428 feet, $34 
per foot, $10.1.53; damages .fliOO- -total. $10,7.53. Lucv 
Ann Harris, 3 and 4 Lincoln street. 95 feet. $13, $114(i: 
damages |lf)0—.fl.SOO. John 11. J. Hincke, (i Lincoln 
Street.l3(i feet.$10.$13(;0; damages, $200— $1400. James 
Barrett, No. 8 Lincoln street, 13:i feet, $H 50, $1108 .50: 
damages, $200— $l;WS 50. Henry Lee. 10:^ Bedford 
street, 270 feet, $30, $7,520; daniages, $550— $8070. 
Total, 114;Heet, $31,240 50: damages. $1710 -$33.0.50 .50. 

Alderman f'lark stated that tlie subject liad been 
before the rommittee on Streets, who were in favor 
of the proposed widening, and he hoped the order 
would take its second reading at this time. 



The resolve and order were passed, in concurrence 
with the Board of Street C'cmimissioners. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman Power — 

Ordered, That licenses to erect steam engines and 
boilers be granted to Williams &■ Everett, corner of 
Bedford and Washington streets, and to Dennison & 
Co., No. 15 Suffolk place. 

On motion of Alderman f !lark— 

Ordered, That there he paid to Azel Bowditch the 
sum of $305 .50, for land taken and all damages occa- 
sioned by the taking of land for the widening of Blue 
Hill avenue, at Warren street, by order of the Board 
of Street f'onnnissioners. upon the usual conditions; 
to be charged to the appropriation for Widening 
Streets. 

Ordered, That there be paid to Mrs. Nancy M. Fred- 
erick, the .sum of $881)2, for land taken in the name of 
the heirs of Jabez Frederick, and all daniages occa- 
sioned by the widening of Summer street, by resolve 
of the Board of Street Commissioners, on the usual 
conditions; to be charged to the Burnt District Loan. 

On motion of Alderm.an Oibson — 

Ordered: That the Committee on Institutions con- 
sider the exyjediency of rescinding or modifying the 
order ])assed December 22. 1871, reciuesting the Judge 
of Probate and other constituted authorities not to 
commit any nnne ])atieiits to the Boston Lunatic 
Hospital. 

REPORTS OF A COWMtTTEE. 

Alderman Power, from the Committee on Steam 
Engines, reported in favor of granting the petition of 
Alexander Moseley, to locate and use a steam engine 
and boiler in South street. Accepted. 

Adjourned. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



59 



CITY OF BOSTOK. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

PKBRUARY 18, 1878. 



The vp.uiilai- weokly meeting of the Cominon f'onn- 
eil was held this eveniiii;, at 1y, o'clocli. K. (), Shep- 
nril, the President, in the cliair. 

PAPEliS FUOM THE BOARD OP ALT)EI;MKN. 

The qnarterly i-eport of the City Clerl; and tlie an- 
nual report of the C'ochitnate Water Board wei'e or- 
dered to be plaeed on file. 

The petitions of Henry A. Rirhards, Samnel R. 
Russell, and Shoe and Leather Dealers" Insurance 
<'oui])any were referred, in concurrence. 

, The remonstrance of Rev. W. F. Mallalieu and the 
invitation of the Protestant Association to be re- 
viewed by the (;ity Government on the 32d February, 
were severally ordered to be placed on file. 

The order for flags to be displayed on t.lie public 
buildings and gi'onnds and a national salute to be 
lil-ed at Ea.st Boston, South Boston, the city proper, 
Eoxbury and Dorchester, on the anniversary of the 
bii'thday of (Jeorge Washington, was read once. 

'The order that the Commissioners on West Boston 
aild Craigie's bridges be instructed to petition tlie 
General Court for authority to reconstruct and widen 
Craigie's Bridge to a width not less than si.Kty-four 
feet, was passed, in concurrence. 

■ The report of the Inspector of Buildings that he 
sees no reason to recommend additional legislation 
relative to theatre scenery, etc., was ordered to be 
placed on tili'. 

The report and order to atithori/e $5000 to be trans- 
ferred from the ajiijropriation for Public Lands to 
that of Printing; from that for Widening Tremont 
street, $55(10. and for Widening Streets, $6000, to 
that for City Hospital, was amended, on motion of 
Air. WesI of Ward Kj, by adding the provision as 
originally reported, to authorizi' the Auditor to trans- 
fer appropriations for the settlement of accounts, etc. 

As amended, the order was passed. 

Tlie election of assistant-assessors was laid over, 
on vote, until the disposal of other business. 

The amendment to order concerning i-efre.slunents, 
etc., by striking out the words -'or for carriage hire,'" 
was considered. 

Mr. Loring of Ward Vi moved an indefinite post- 
ponement of the order, on which motion Mr. Page of 
Ward 9 asked for the yeas and navs. which were or- 
dered. 

The motion to indefinitely postpone was lost bv a 
vete of If) yeas to 84 nays, as follows: 

Yeas— Anderson, Blackmar. Bowles, Caton, Collins. 
Daicey,N. Doherty. T. H. Doherty, Edwards, Flatley, 
Harrington, Loring, Martin, MeOue. McKenney, 
JlOrse, Pease, ^\'arren, Weston. 

T!^ays— AblMitl, Adams. Barnes, Bicknell, Brackett, 
Bnrditt, Burt, Cudworth, Davis, Dean, Denny, Flynn, 
Hall, Hint', Jones. Kingsley. Madden, Marstbn. Page, 
Pevkins, Pickering. Powers. Prescott. Risteen, Shaw, 
Thacher, Tower, Train, Ujiham. Wells. West. \^'histon. 
Woods, Woodward. 

■ Mr. Flynn moved that the Council adhere to its 
former vote. 

'The f'hair stated that the same result would be 
reached by voting on the fjuestion of concurrence. 
'On motion of Mr. Thacher of Ward l.'i. the yeas 
and nays were ordared oji the question. 

In answer to an inquiry, the Chair stated the cjues- 
tjon to be on concurrence with the Board of Alder-, 
men, in striking out the words '-or tor carriage hire."" 

Mr. Dean of Ward 12 hoped the Council >vould con- 
cur with the Board of Aldermen, for after voting 
against the indefinite jxistponement of the oi-der, he 
cpiikl not see how they could refuse to pass it. It. 
wpnld be honestly and practically impossible for 
members of committees to discharge their duties 
without carriage hire. Suppose there should be pav- 
ing required in Ward Ki, and the committee should 
be recpiired to see to it; sujjpose also at llie same 
time similar work should be required in Waid 1-2 
and in Roxbury. if carnages should not be allowed. 
for their use the work could not l)e well done. . . 

The result would be that members of committees 
•would not go together, and in many cases they would 
go separately, and individual reports would be made 
with the indorsement only of one member of the 
committee. The result would be disastrous to the, 
public bnsiiiess, and if concurrence was lost, the 
order would be likely to be disregarded or shorf- 
ived. So far as refreshments were concerned, the 



two branches wcr(^ in accord, and both had said they 
would do without them. He could not say fliaf he 
liked it. altog<'ther, or that the action agreed with his 
judgment, but it should stand until it could be tried. 
He wasopijosed to indefinite postponement, but was 
content to pass the order. lie hoped they would 
concur in the amendment with an honest desire to pro- 
mote the public convenience. 

Mr. Flynn said he wished to be consistent as his 
conscience directed, and referred to the action of the 
Board of .'\ldermen in passing an order at the same 
meeting at which this amendment was made, in au- 
thorizing the chairman of the Board to appiove of 
bills incurred by members to be paid out of the Con- 
tingent Fund. Should the Council pass this order 
while the Board pass orders authorizing the approval 
of bills, as proposed'/ He hoped they would be con- 
sistent, and that all would be servec\ alike in incur- 
ring expenses. 

Mr. DeaM said he did not understand that the fail- 
ure to concur would prevent the order of the Board 
from taking effect. In the order referred to, the 
Board had passed the same order which the (Council 
had passed, and even after the passage of this order - 
the order of the Board would be proper in the ap-- 
))roval of bills. That would have been essential, 
even had this never been introduced. 

The question was taken on concurrence, which, 
was lost, by a vote of 19 yeas to .35 nays, as follows: 

Yeas— Abbott, Bicknell, Blackmar, Bleilcr, Bowles,- 
Bui'ditt, Collins, Darrow, Dean, Denny, Hine, Kelley, 
Loring, Morse, Perkins, Pickering, Warren, West,- 
Woodward. 

Nays— Adams, Anderson, Barnes, Brackett, Burt, 
Catoi'i, Cudwoith, Dacey, Davis, N. Doherty, T. H. 
Doherty. Edwards, Flatley, Flynn. IlalL Harring- 
ton. Jones, Kingsley, Madden, Martin, McCue, 
Page, Pease, Pciwers. Prescott, Risteen, Shaw, 
Thacher, Tower, Train, Upham, Wells. Weston, 
Whiston, Woods. 

■ SirPERINTKNOENT OF MERIDIAN-STREET BRIDOE. 

The report nominating Reuben B. Wendell as Su- 
perintendent of Meridian-street Bridge was accept- 
ed, in concurrence, when the Council proceeded to 
ah election, resulting as follows: 

Wliole nuuiber (if Notes 5i 

Xecessary to a clKiicc 28 

David W. Doaue 34 

Reuben P.. Wendell 30 

Mr. Doane was declared to be elected, in noncon- 
ciirrence. 

The resolve and order for the widening of Lincoln 
street was taken up. and on motion of Sir. Flynn of 
Ward 7. the rules were sn.spended. and the resolve 
and order for the widening was passed, in concur- 
rence. 

The order to rescind an order relative to refusal of-' 
permits for admission to the Lunatic Hospital at 
South Boston was considered. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward (j said that in a recent visit 
to the ho.spital it had more patients than it could 
conveniently accommodate, and h<' did not see any 
reason for the ordei-. 

Mr. Denny of Ward 9 said he knew of no reason for' 
the order excerpt to provide for special cases, in which'' 
iti was deemed advisalile to send patients to the hos- 
pital. It was dc'signed by if that the trustees or the' 
committee should consider the expediency of rescind- 
ing the former order, 

Mr. Perkins said it was undei'sfood last year that 
the Judge of Prol)ate exercised the power of acting in 
special cases without asking the permission of the'. 
City Council. 

Air. Denny replied that the Judge of Probate was 
unwilling to exercise such a\ithorlfy while the order 
remained in forci'. 

Mr. Perkins said if tlu't was the case he would 
withdraw his objections. 

Mr. Loring of Ward \'2 said it was understood 
three or four patients had been sent to the hospital,-' 
since the passage of tlu' order, by whose authority he 
did not know. 

The order was jiassed. 

KNFINISHEO BI'SINESS. 

The following orders were severally read a second 
time and passed: 

Order that .$1100, to ))ay for twenty-five portable 
tire extinguishers, loreplace1lio.se destroyed by fire 
Nov. 9, 1873, be appropriated. 

Order to pay Jimies Munroe, Assistant-Engineer of 
the Fire Department, .$:il .")(), for jicrsonal services, 
provided the bill be approved in the usual manner. 

COMMISSIONER OP CEDAB-OROVE CEMETEHT. 

The certificate of the election of William Pope as 
Commissioner of Cedar-Grove Cemetery was read, 
when the Council proceeded to an election, and WU- 



60 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



liam Pope wasj chosen, in concuncnee, liy n niian- 
imons vote. 

WATEU RK(iI«TRAU. 

The certificate of the election of Williiini F. Davii^ 
as Water Kegistrar was read, when the Council pro- 
ceeded to an election, and William F. l)a\is\vas 
chosen, in concurrence, hy a vote of 'IK to 1 lor an 
ineligible person. 

SITPERINTENDENTS OF BRIDGES, 

The report nominating Jacob Norris for Superin- 
tendent of Federal-street Bridge; Angus Nelson, for 
Superintendent of Dover-stree't Bridge; Edward T. 
Stowers. for Superintendent of Chelsea-street Bridgi'; 
Albert O. Hawcs, for Snijerintendent of Orauile 
Bridge: .Tohn Glavin, for Superintendent of Nepon- 
set Bridge; John C. Poole, for Superintendent of 
Broadway Bridge; and George H. Davis, for Super- 
intejident of Mt. Washington-avenue Bridsje, was ac- 
cepted, when the certificates of the election of the 
above-named persons as snch superintendents were 
read. 

The Council proceeded to an election of the whole 
oil one ticket, on motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 7, the 
result of which was as follows: 

Whole number of votes T>i>. 

Superintendent of Federal-street Bridge— Jacob 
Norris .5ti. 

Superintendent of Dover-street Bridge-Angus 
Nelson 5,t; John McNamara 1. 

Superintendent of Chelsea-street Bridge— Edward 
T. Stowers 5ti. 

Superiniendenf of Granite Bridge -Albert O. Hawes 
56. 

Superintendent of Neponset Bridge —John Glaviii 
55; P. I. Grace 1. 

Superintendent of Broadway Bridge— John C. 
Poole 56. 

Superintendent of Mount Washington-avenue 
Bridge — George H. Davis 56. 

These Superintendents were severally declared to 
be elected in C(mcurrence. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

James King, to be paid for peisonal injuries sus- 
tained in Rug'gles street, by a fall upon the icy side- 
walk. 

Catherine Barrel!, for compensation for personal in- 
juries. 

Currier, Trott & Co., for compensation for injuries 
received to property on the 9th and 10th of Novem- 
ber. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Claims. 
; A communication was received from the School 
Committee, with an order requesting the City Coun- 
cil to furnish the requisite accommodations for the 
new primary class in the PrescotI School District. 
Referred to the Committee on Public Instruction. 

ANNUAL REPORT OP THE SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

IThe annual report of the Superintendent of Streets 
was laid before the Council in print 

The report states that the >um of $1,010..'S08 48 was 
expended by the Paving Department during the mu- 
nicipal year 1872, for paving, repaving, grading, re- 
pairs of streets, removing and levelling snow, and 
tor grade damages, etc., a detail of which is given. 
The aggregates show expenditures for the several 
sections of the city, as follows: 

City Proper $4:^8,473 40 

South Boston 8a.94li 09 

East Host on 77,491 13 

F.oxbury 192.627 44 

Dorchester 79,129 65 

Incidentals 64,497 71 

Grade damages 75,343 06 

$1,010,508 48 
The expenditures for grade damages were for 

services in making estimates $lfiJO 00 

City Proper 6,161 25 

Pvoxbury 15.372 95 

- South Boston 6,.550 00 

East Boston 27,433 86 

Dorcliester W,825 OB 

The amount appropriated for paving, etc., for the 
pxcseiu financial year, 1873-:^, was |1,000.000, to which 
■- 'has been added |1000, paid into the city treasury, on 
account of retaining wall on Harrison avenue: total 
expenditures of the present financial year, to Janua- 
ry 1, 1873. $8.38,16:B 06. Balance of appropriation un- 
expended January 1, 187:1 |]62,836 04. 

The amount of bills for edgestones. constructing 

. and repairs of sidewalks, and old materials, lodged 

with the City Treasurer during the year 1872. for col- 

lection was $15.039 46. 

•The amount paid into the city treasury, during the 

same period, and credited as having been paid in by 



the Paving Department, on account of work done by 
said department, was .#79(U 56. 

Watc/'-n/ivi't (IrKde DufiKif/is. The payment of grade 
damages on Water street, the cases of which were 
submitted to referees, amounted to $71,703 .50, of 
which amount $47,967 56 was paid in 1871. A trans-. 
for of $100,000 was authorized in 1K71 from the appro- 
priation for Paving, made a special appropriation for 
Water-street grade damages. Of this amount there 
remains a balance of $28.29(i ,50, which is deemed 
sufficient to settle the few renuiining claims. 

In addition to the supervision of operations of the 
Paving Department, the Superintendent has been call- 
ed upon, during the past year, to take charge of a large 
amount of other work, tile <'ost of which has been 
charged to the sjiecial apiiropriations enumerated. 

These were as follows: Atlantic avenue. $;^3a8 08; 
South Market-street extension, $:Sta9 95; Kneeland- 
street widening, $7733 41: Shawmul-avenue exten- 
sion, etc., $15,079 38; Harrison-avenue extension, 
$1380 06: Canton-street grading, $1748 01; Dudley. 
Stoughton and other streets, $40,843 61; Fort Hill, 
$86,190 03; Suffolk-street District, $61,076 66; wood 
paving, $27,6.57 34; Tremont-sfreet grading, $14,064; 
Shawmut-avenue Bridge sidewalks, $339 90: adver- 
tising, $107 01. Total. $103,144 91. 

BacTi Bay Bridgets. Amount expended on Back 
Bav bridges, charged to the special appropriation for 
that purpose, $190,473 88. 

RuUroad Loca/io/is. The several railroad locations 
to the Metropolitan, Middlesex, Plighland and Union 
Freight and Albany-street Freight Railroad com- 
panies, are specified. Of the freight railroads the 
Superintendent says — 

"The principal objection to the occupation of the 
narrow streets of this city by freight railroads arises 
from the delay occasioned to public travel by the 
blocking up of the streets in loading and unloading 
cars. If the business of these roads increases to any 
considerable extent, this will prove a serious incoi)- 
venience, unless wider avenues are pro\ ided to ac- 
commodate the cars, and leave room for the free pas- 
sage of vehicles." 

Beacon /(Ireet. On this subject the Superintendent 
says — 

"In the early part of last year petitions from about 
one hundred of the heaviest taxpayers of Boston were . 
presented to the Board of Aldermen, representing 
the crossing of Beacon street with the Boston & 
Albany Railroad as extremely dangerous to public 
travel, and praying that a bridge might be erected 
over the railroael, and the street graded so as to carry 
the travel over and above the tracks instead of upon 
a level with thein. The railroad corporation was fa- 
vorably- disposed towards the project, and signified 
its willingness to contribute liberally towards the ex- 
pense of the same. The Committee on Paving called 
upon the City Engineer for plan.s and estimates for a 
bridge on Beacon street, and also for one on Brook- 
line avenue, it being evident that it would be neces- 
sary to bridge the railroad u,>on both avenues. The 
statutes of the Commonwealth provide that no bridge 
shall be constructed over any railroad of a less height 
than eighteen feet in the clear above the tracks, vvitji- 
out the consent of the Board of Railroad Comfni4- 
sioners. 

As fifteen feet was all that the railroad corporation 
required at these points, and the addition of three 
feet would not only increase the cost of the bridges 
and the grading of the avenues, but also the claims 
for grade damages by the owners of the adjacent 
lands, the committee and the railroad corporation 
united in an application to the Board of Railroad 
Commissioners for leave to construct these bridges 
at a height of fifteen feet in the clear above the 
tracks. Permission to that effect was granted No- 
vember 13, 1873. The Engineer's estimate of the cost 
of the bridges and the grading of the avenues was 
f:304,.590, Ovving to the latenes? of the season at 
which these results were obtained, and the moment- 
ary check given to public improvements by the fire of 
November 9. no further action was taken by the coiri- 
mittee in the premises. The constantly increasing 
travel upon these avenues as well as upon the railroad 
renders these bridges ab olutely necessary for the 
safety of the public. The cost at present seems large, 
but the rapid increase in the value of the adjacent 
land, and the certainty that building operations will 
soon be commenced, admonish us that delay will be 
attended with increased expense, and that immediate 
action will prove the most economical in the end." 

WOOD PAVEMENTS. 

The following table shows the streets in which wood 
pavements were laid down during the past year, the 
kind of pavement, number of yards, and price per' 
yard of each: 



FEBRXl ARY 



O 



1873 



61 



StriM'ls. 
Ndvtli BpiiiiPt, 
Cciitnil, 

I)O|-('llt>St0V, 
l.ilHlllll. 

l.cnox, 
Beacon, 
Doaiie, 
Sutfolk-sl. 



Disl. 





Sr|. Vils. 


} 


er Vcl. 


Laiii'iiKti'i'," 


WW.IO 


(«' 


%•■'■ (10 


Warren." 


H«r).(i(l 




:! IK) 




SK.Sd 




•i m 




:i74.SO 




3 \7^. 


Bos(on,"' 


521.(1(1 




2 7r. 




a,86J..48 




2 51 


*• 


13,317.70 




2 44 


" 


6ie.(lll 




2 28 




lll,47ti.27 




2 ti4 



Total, 29,'.24.;S 

Of the Warren and Boston pavements some stale- 
UK'iits are made in relaliou to the inventions, ami il 
is remarked- - 

"The above paxenienls are simple in consl ruclldii. 
easily laid down and repaired, and are prel'iialile in 
many respeets to the more eomplicaled a:id io>II> 
pavements heretofore laid down in tliis city.'" 

•With reference to the commission on thesuh.jecl of 
wood pavements, it is said— 

.-"It is conticicntly hoped that the matter iu the 
hWds of this commission will receive such thorough 
investigation as to make their report a valuable docu-- 
ment for future reference and guidance. ' 

Ooirlieslef. In relation to Dorchester the Superin- 
tendent says — 

"I wish to call particular alt en lion to the necessity of 
providing for the surface drainage of Dorchester. 
Although three years have passed since this town was 
annexed to Boston, nothing has been done to supply 
this want. There being no sewers in this section of 
the city, the water whicii c(dlects upon the street;* is 
suffered to stand in pond holes or let ofi upon the 
first convenient lot of land. In former times, when 
a road became defective or inconvenient to travel 
from standing water, an attempt would be made to 
remedy the evil by filling the low places with broken 
stones' or dirt. In this way the grades of the streets 
were constantly undergoing a change. A sample of 
this style of work can be seen on IJorchester avenue, 
where the horse-railroad track, which, when laid, was 
upon the crown of the road, now forms a trench in 
the centre, the sides having been raised from time to 
time by repeated layers of broken stone. The con- 
veying" of water upon ad.iacent land was considered, 
as a general thing, rather an advantage than a disad- 
vantage, — the lan(i being used for cultivation, the wa- 
ter served to irrigate the same. 

The improvements which have been made during 
tbe past three years call for an entire change in this 
regard. New streets have been laid out, the land di- 
vided into building lots and houses erecter". The 
wash of the streets upon these lots is no longer an 
advantage, but an intolerable nuisance. Complaints 
are made after every rain storm of yards, gardens 
and cellars flooded with the wash from the streets 
which this department is powerless to prevent, for 
want of sewers to receive and convey away the water. 
The city has no right to turn the water from its high- 
ways upon ad.iacent land, in opposition to the wishes 
of the abutters, but is bound legally and morally to 
provide drainage for said highways. It is not in the 
province of the' Paving Department to build sewers. 
The Sewer Department constructs them only when 
called upon to supply the means for house drainage. 
As long as citizens can, without serious inconven- 
ience to themselves, drain into cesspools in their own 
premises, or convey their drainage into the street gut- 
ters, they are not likely to assess themselves for the 
construction of sewers. Couse(iuently none are built, 
and the street drainage is left unprovided for. The 
first requisite for a good road is thorough drainage. 
It is unreasonable to expect that good roads can be 
constructed and maintained in this section of the 
city until drainage is provided. This is a serious 
matter, and requires immediate attention. A thor- 
ough system of sewerage should be devised without 
delay, and put into immediate execution." 

The report was ordered to be sent up. 

REPORT ON ELECTION OF GEORGE A. SHAW. 

Mr. Flynn moved that the Council take up the re- 
port of fhe Committee on Elections on the petition 
of William M. Flanders and others, in relation to the 
sear occupied in the Board by George A. Shaw. 

The report was taken up. when Mr. Perkins of 
Ward b offered as a substitute for the conclusions of 
the committee an order that George A. Shaw was not 
on the day of election eligible to a seat in the Coun- 
cil, and that said seat be now declared vacant. 

Mr. Bicknell of Ward 4 briefly addressed the Coun- 
cil in support of the views of the committee, stating 
that they had made their report on the evidence and 
facts in the case, the law being determined as de- 
clared by the City Solicitor. He regretted th.at Mr. 
Holmes of the committee was not present, upon whom 
the principal labor devolved in making up the re- 
port. 

Ml'- Perkins of Ward 6 said he did not oppose the 



report out of any disresi)ect to the committee, and 
he was sorry that his colleague wtis not present to 
defend his report. 

Mr. Bicknell moved to lay the report over to the 
nextmeeting. 

.Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 wished to know if assurances 
could be given that Mr. Holmes would be present at 
the next meeting of the Council, He had hoped that 
the sitting nien\l)er from Ward 5 would have vacated 
his seat during the pendency of this question, and lie 
would ask the ruling of the Chair whether he could 
occupy the seat until tlu' (piestion should be settled. 

.Mr. Dean of Ward 12 hoi)ed the request would be 
\\ ithdrawn, for it was clear that the gentleman was 
entitled to his seat until it was declared vacant. It 
uas not a question affecting him alone, but the Coun- 
cil, and he trusted the subject would be carefully 
considered. He hoped the motion to lay the sub.iect 
over would prevail. 

The Cluur stated that on the request of the gentle- 
man from Ward 7 he could not rule the gentleman 
from Ward .") to be out of order in retaining his seat. 
So far as this stage of proceedings was concerned he 
is still a member of the ( 'ouncil, and his retaining it 
rests entirely upon his sense of proxiriety... . 

Mr. Perkins said he should be glad to vote for post- 
ponement, should it be understood that it is to be 
C(msidered next week. 

Mr. Bicknell was not able to say whether Mr. 
Holmes would be present or not next week, but pre- 
sumed he would be. 

The motion to postpone was carried. 

REPORTS OF rOM.MlTTEES. 

Mr. Bicknell of Ward 4, from the Committee on 
Elections, on the petition of William M. Flanders and 
others, that at the dale of the last municipal election 
in Ward 5, John W. Mahan was not a resident in said 
Ward, and, therefore, not eligible to a seat ii the 
Common Council, made a report that the petitioners 
having failed to appear in support of their representa- 
tions, after being repeatedly notified to do so. no fur- 
ther action is necessary thereon. 

The report was accepted, 

Mr. Bicknell of Ward 4, from the Joint Standing 
Committee on Public Buildings, acting upon an order 
from the City Council, namely, to purchase a lot of 
land on the corner of Warren and (Juincy streets and 
to erect thereon an engine house, at a cost for land 
and building of $20,000. made a report, as follows; 

They have purchased the land agreeably to the 
order, expending from the appropriation the sum of 
f t)452 22. They have also received estimates for the 
erection of the building thereon, and find that owing 
to the advance in building materials the unexpended 
balance of the appropriation will not be sufficient for 
the completion of the work; but at the lowest esti- 
mate 110.000 nKwewill be required before the work of 
building can be contracted for. 

The committee would therefore recommend the 
passage of the accompanying order: 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be authorized to bor- 
row, under the direction of the Committee on Fi- 
nance, the sum of $10,000, to be added to the amount 
already authorized, for Engine House Ward 14. 

The order was read onceT 

Mr. Blackmar of Ward 11. from the Committee on 
Claims, on the petition of Daniel W. Bugbee to be 
paid for injuries received by an alleged defect in Dor- 
chester avenue, made a report recommending that the 
petitioner have leave to withdraw. Accepted. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 7— 

Ordered, Thar the Committee on Legislative Mat- 
ters on the part of the Common Council be instructed 
to take sucli steps as they may deem proper for the 
alteration of chapter 309. acts of 1809, as shall require 
the approval of the City Council in place of the Board 
of Aldermen in the erection, occupation or use of sta- 
bles in this city. 

Mr. Flynn stated that the order was the same which 
passed this branch last week, and was lost in the Board 
of Aldermen. The Committee on Health were of 
opinion that the erection and use of stables ought to 
lie under the control of the City Council, which was 
the reason why the order was put in. 

On motion of Mr. Perkins of Ward ti— 

Ordered. That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Printing be requested to have an index prepared for 
the volumes of the City Council minutes for the 
years 18t)9, 1870. 1871 and 1872: the expenses thereof 
to be charged t» the appropriation for Printing. 

Mr. Denny of Ward 9 ottered an order authorizing 
the Superinrendent of Health to employ one princi- 
pal clerk and such assistants as may be "necessary in 
his department, the compensation "for the same to be 
approved by the Joint Standing Committee on Health, . 

The order was read once. 



63 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



ELECTION OF ASSISTANT-ASSESSORS. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 7, the election of 
First Assistant- Assessors was taken np, under a sus- 
pension of the rules. 

The report of the committee nominating certain 
persons, specified, for assessors, was accepted, and 
the Council proceeded to an election. 
The result of the ballot was as follows: 

Whole number of votes 58 

Necessary to a choice 30 

Benjaniin F. Palmer 56 

William .T. Ellis 56 

Michael Carney 53 

Theophilus Burr 2"i 

John M. Maguire 54 

P. Ambrose Young 51 

Joseph L. Drew 54 

Charles E. Jackson 55 

Edwin B. Spimiey 51 

Edward F. Robinson 5? 

Georee F. Williams 55 

Otis Rich 55 

William Gallagher 50 

George F. Davis 56 

L. Foster Morse 56 

Isaac F. Atwood 42 



Phineas B. Smitli 5'i 

AVllliam Witliington 56 

Jolui L. Brigham 54 

Henry Pierce 55 

John H. Giblin 54 

William H. Cundy 46 

Thaddeus Gould 50 

Andrew J. Browne 55 

Charles No well 48 

James Dennie 15 

A. G. Wyman 4;i 

James rfealey 44 

Artemas R. itolden 44 

J. K. Crowley 25 

C. D. Blcktord 24 

Horatio N. Holnrook IS 

A. D. C:apen 12 

\V. H. Mcintosh ii 

P. F. McGarigle 2 

M. J. (;roak 2 

K. W. Jones 1 

The persons having the requisite number of votes 
were declared to be elected, Messrs. Healey and Hol- 
den being elected in place of Theopilns Burr, and 
James Dennie, elected by the Board of Aldermen. 

Adjourned. 



63 



BOARD OF alderm:en. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of tlic Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 17, 1873. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Alder- 
men washeld this afternoon, at four o'clock, Alder- 
man Cutter, the Chairman, presiding. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFrRMED. 

Weigher of Coal and Measurer of Wood — Daniel E. 
Adams. 

Special Police Officers, without pay— C. M. Hug- 
gins for duty at John A. Andrew Hall; Charles E. 
Stowe for duty at the Meridian-street M. E. Church, 
East Boston. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

P. S. Morton, for leave to occupy a wooden stahle 
for four additional horses on First street, between I 
and K streets. 

Joseph D. Crowell, for leave to occupy a wooden 
stahle for three horses on Eastern Packet Pier. 

John H. Marshall, for leave to occupy a wooden 
stable for two horses on Trenton street, rear No. 82. 

John D. Lane, for leave to occupy a stable for two 
horses rear No. 90 Trenton street. 

Asa P. Potter, executor, for leave to establish a sta- 
ble at No. 31 Way street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Health, on 
the part of this Board. 

Bridget Maloney, for apportionment of Cliff-street 
betterments. 

Sarah C. Edmunds, for abatement of betterments 
for extension of Harrison avenue. 

Faxon & Elms, for increase of damages allowed for 
land taken on High street. 

Josiah Bardwell, for increase of compensation for 
land taken to widen Otis street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

William R. Clark and others, trustees, for the con- 
veyance to them of a piece of land in Ward If!. 

Trustees of Museum of Fine Arts, for extension of 
time in which to build their edifice. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Public 
Lands. 

Sarah Park, for a sewer in Third street, from Emer- 
son street to H street 

D. J. O'Farrell and others, for a sewer in Saratoga 
street, near Winthrop line. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Sewers. 

Jewett & Pitcher and others, that the draw of the 
Chelsea-street Bridge may be opened when necessary 
for the passage of the fire boat. Referred to Com- 
mittee on Bridges. 

Dennis Conway, to he paid for grade damages on 
Fourth street. Referred to Committee on Paving. 

Lydia A. Edgcomb, for a hearing or recompense by 
the city, for keeping a smallpox patient in her house. 

William Whitaker, for damages for injury to his 
son by discharge of fireworks on Independence square. 

Robert Johnson, for compensation for injury sus- 
tained in city sewer in Warren street. 

Patrick Cunningham, to be paid for personal in- 
juries caused by a fall on Harrison avenue. 

Charles J. McKay, to be paid for injuries sustained 
by his wife by reason of defective sidewalk in Tro- 
mont street. 

Severally referred to Committee on Claims. 

Faulkner & Clarke, that Arch street be closed 
while building operations are in progress. Referred 
to Committees on Paving and Police. 

REPORT or HAYWEIGHER OF NORTH SCALES. 

The quarterly report of the Superintendent of the 
City Scales in Haymarket square, for the quarter 
ending January 31, gives as receipts for weighing 
merchandise the sum of $1339 40, forty per cent, 
of which, amounting to $535 70, less expenses $171 75, 
leaving $3(>4 01, has been paid into the City Treasury. 

Ordered to be sent down. 

ANNUAi REPORT OP THE CITY ENGINEER. 

The annual report of Joseph P. Davis, City Engin- 
eer, was laid before the Board in print. The report 
is made up to a great extent of the report of Henry 
M. Wightman, Assistant City Engineer, to which the 
Engineer refers, not having had time in recently assum- 
ing the duties of the office to examine the various 
l)ridges reported upon, with sufficient care to be 
able to give a statement of the condition of all them. 

The Engineer remarks upon the condition of the 
bridges, as follows: 

Attention is called to the condition of the Broad- 
Way Bridge. There appears to be a want of lateral 



stiffness in the supporting trusses to the spans over 
streets and railways, and a ratio of strength to strain 
less than is usually provided in the suspension rods 
of the draw. Also the towers are out of plumb, ow- 
ing in part, at least, to a settlement of their supports. 
Measures have been taken to ascertain exactly what 
movements have taken place, and those, if any, that 
are now occurring. 

The hot-air engines used for turning the draw need 
thorough overhauling and repair, and as they are 
not of sufficient power to handle the draw properly, 
and are costly in maintenance, owing in part to the 
high speed at which they are necessarily run, it is 
recommended that they be replaced by machines of 
greater power and of different character. 

It now requires nearly three minutes to turn the 
draw on or off. This operation should be performed 
in, at the most, one half this time, and provided suffi- 
cient lateral strength can be given to the draw by ties 
and braces to resist accidental shocks, there seems to 
be no good reason why it should not be performed in 
one jminute. Steam engines of from two to three 
times the power of the hot-air engines are recom- 
mended for this place. 

The supporting piles of the Chelsea-street Bridge 
are in bad condition and past repair. The bridge, 
with the exception of its draw, must be rebuilt, and 
work upon it should commence as early in the spring 
as the weather will permit. 

The abutments of the Huntington-avenue Bridge 
over the Boston & Albany Railroad have been badly 
injured and o'le of the wing walls destroyed by the 
pressure of the mud against the pile foundations, 
combined with the pressure of the earth backing 
against the masonry. 

It seems difficult, if not impossible (except at an 
enormous cost), to build abutments or retaining walls 
that will not move and crack, on such ground as was 
found at this place, unless entire control can be had 
of the earth filling behind, and for considereble dis- 
tance around them. Long piles are required to reach 
through the soft mud, and even if driven well into a 
firm stratum beneath, they do not possess sufficient 
stitfness to resist effectually the movement of the 
mud surrounding their upper ends. No weight that 
it is practicable to put upon them will keep them in 
place. The most that can be done is to tie the piles 
well together, and give the mud as much an:l as 
straight passageway between them as possible. 
Even then movements will occur unless the earth 
filling is carefully made; though fortunately they 
ordinarily cease before the abutment is ruined or 
rendered unserviceable. 

Observations are being made from time to time at 
the Huntington-avenue abutments, to determine 
what changes are now occurring, and if possible 
their exact cause. It is not thought best to rebuild 
the wing wall until the observations are completed 
and a plan to secure and strengthen the whole struct- 
ure has been devised. 

In the report for 1870, the City Engineer recom- 
mends rebuilding the Neponset Bridge over Neponset 
River at the earliest moment. Its condition has not 
improved since that time, and a new structure should 
be built the coming season, the old one being too far 
gone to admit of effective repair. 

The Longwood-avenue Bridge is not in good condi- 
tion. The supporting trestle work is somewhat de- 
cayed and the abutment on the Brookline side has 
moved and seriously cracked, owing probably to a 
bad foundation. 

The track to the Meridian-street drawbridge re- 
quires some repairs, the draw piers should be replank- 
ed, and the asphalt sidewalks repaired. 

The following-named bridges need to be repainted: 

Albany-street Bridge, over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road. 

Berkeley-street Bridge, over Boston & Providence 
Railroad. 

Columbus-avenue Bridge, over Boston & Albany 
Railroad. 

Ferdinand-street Bridge, over Boston & Albanv 
Railroad. 

The ironwork under the bridge floors, which is apt 
to be neglected on account of difficulty of access, 
should be kept well painted and in good state of 
of preservation, as well as thoso parts that are above 
and in sight. 

Water Wm^ks. On this subject the Engineer refers 
to the low stage of water at Lake Cochituate in Janu- 
ary, 1872, the measures taken by legislation to pro- 
vide for a further supply, and a description of the 
work to be done, which was given in a report of the 
Water Board in May last. In the ditch from Farm 
Pond to Beaver Dam Brook the water was let in June 
19, and was run to June 25, to draw down the level of 
the pond and finish the deepening of the mouth of 
the ditch. 

On June 25, water from the river was turned into 



FEBRUARY 17 



1873 



64. 



the pond, and from thence let into the lake, and the 
flow was continued uninterruptedly until August 7, 
when it was stopped to tinish the side planking of the 
ditch. Angust l(i the communication was again 
opened, and was kept open till Septemher 17, when it 
was closed for the season. 

The quantity of water received from the river dur- 
ing the seventy-five days of f\o\\ has not yet been ac- 
curately computed, but it cannot have been far from 
fifteen hundred millions of gallons, or equal to the 
supply to the city, taken at the average for the year. 
for about one hundred days. . 

On June 25, the water in the lake stood at five feet 
eleven and one-half inches above the bottom of the 
conduit; on August 7, at six feet eight and one-half 
inches; on August 10, at six feet four inches; and on 
September 17, at ten feet one inch. The rise above 
shown was chiefly due to the large rainfall of the 
summer months, the supply from the river having 
been bat about thirty per cent, in excess of the lon- 
sumption in the city. 

The lake is now as nearly full as it is deemed pru- 
dent to keep it at this season of the year. 

The average daily consumption in 1871 was 13,945,- 
500 gallons; that in" 1872 has been 15,003,432 gallons; 
an increase of eight per cent. 

The average daily consumption for each month 
during the past year has been as follows: 

January 12,a03.;iU gallons. 

February 15,172,040 

March 15,788.490 

April 12,281,008 

May 13.830,591 " 

June l'4,B17,(i52 

July 16,377,133 

August 15,017,851 " 

Sopteuiber 15,072,615 

October 15,544,788 

M oveml)er 17,591,442 

December 17,263,671 " 

The above quantities are approximate only. There 
are no means provided at any part of the woi'ks for 
obtaining accurate data by which the quantities of 
water drawn from the lake, or supplied to the city, 
can be computed. 

An examination of the interior of the conduit from 
the lake to Chestnut-llill Reservoir was made Octo- 
ber 12 and 13. It was found in a better condition 
than had been anticipated, but a number of new 
cracks were discovered and many of the old ones had 
widened (as was shown by the breaking away of the 
cement pointing), indicating that movemeiits of a 
dangerous character are still taking place. A length 
of several thousand fee: at the upper end was found 
covered with a thick vegetable growth resembling 
sponge, and a deposit of sand of several inches in 
thickness was found on the bottom, probably thrown 
in by the pumps used in the early part of the sea- 
son 

The various reservoirs and the distributing pipes 
are in good condition. Probably some changes will 
be made during the coming season in the street-pipe 
system and in the hydrants, that a more abundant 
supply of water may be provided in case of exten- 
sive fires. 

Owing to additions that have been made to the area 
supplied by the high service, and to the necessity for 
furnishing a large supply of water in case of fire 
within that area, changes should be made in the high- 
service works that will practically increase their ca- 
pacity. 

This can be done either by increasing the pumping 
power, or by building a reservoir connected with the 
standpipe. The reservoir would permit the pumps 
to be run at a uniform speed throughout the day, 
thereby very much increasing their effective capacity 
and would hold in reserve a large supply of water to 
be at once drawn upon for the extinguishment of 
fires. 

By request of the Water Board, surveys and esti- 
mates have been made by this department, to deter- 
mine what changes and extensions can be made, and 
a report will soon be presented for their considera- 
tion. 

The report of the Assistant City Engineer gives 
$18,405 as the expenditures in the department, leav- 
ing an unexpended balance of $6535 52, and there 
was expended from special appropriations $0974 74. 
The number of persons employed on the 1st of Janu- 
ary was sixteen. 

The high portion of South Bo-ston is now connected 
with the high service main in Borchester by an inde- 
pendent pipe twelve inches in diameter, and the high 
service pipes are being rapidly extended on the ele- 
vated land in Ward 10. It is recommended that the 
new 48-inch pipe frem the Chestnut-Hill Reservoir to 
the city be laid through the streets to the Tremont- 
street crossing of the Providence Railroad to connect 
with the present mains. 

In the removal of the earth from Fort Hill, the sev- 



eral contracts make a total of 547,028 cubic yards re- 
moved, at a cost of $447,122. 

The Milton Bridge over the Neponset River, at Mil- 
ton Lower Falls has been widened aboui twenty feet 
on the easterly side, and a new retaining wall has 
been built on the Boston side of the river. The cost 
of the addition was $22,797 09, of which the town of 
Milton paid $5000. 

The condition of tlie several other bridges is re- 
ferred to with remarks upon the same, the principal 
points of which are given in the report of the Engi- 
neer. 

Mention is made of the work done upon tlie several 
bridges, wharves at Deer Island and at Gallop's Isl- 
ancl. East Boston ferries, Pinckney-street seu wall, 
and of miscellaneous constructions and estimates in 
1872. A list of fifteen bridges is given over tide 
water, rivers and creeks, and of twelve over raih-oade 
and highways. The Albany-street Bridge, over the 
Roxbury Canal, was put in thorough repair last 
spring. The fourth approximate estimate of the 
widening of Federal-street Bridge shows the amount 
of work done and materials furnished to be $09,329. 

The report was ordered to be sent down. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were severally road a second 
time and passed : 

Order to pay J. J. Dixwell andB. S. Rand, trustees, 
$33,480, for land taken to widen Lindall street. 

Order to pay James McGregor $830, for land taken 
to widen High street. 

Order to pay T. H. Parker, George Billings and 
Sarah Parker $5523 55, for land taken on Blue-Hill 
avenue. 

Order to pay Sarah Parker $311 30, for land taken 
on Blue-Hill avenue. 

Order to pay E. D. Sohier and Charles A. Welch, 
executors, $1100 40, for land taken from Charles J. 
Taylor on Cottage street. 

Order to pay J., J. F. and J. W. Faxon $10,318, for 
land taken to widen Otis street. 

Order to pay Frederic L. Richardson and William S. 
Dexter, trustees, $5050, for land taken to widen Pur- 
chase street. 

Order to pay heirs of Ann G. Frothingham .$5700, 
for land taken to widen Bedford street. 

Order to pay Company A and band of the Second 
Battalion of Infantry, $120 90, for mileage in attend- 
ing camp in August and September, 1872. 

Order, that the Committee on Ordinances be re- 
quested to report an ordinance providing that the 
Port Physician shall be either the physician or the as- 
sistant physician, (as the Board of Directors for Pub- 
lic Institutions may elect,) of all the city establish- 
ments which are, or may be, located upon Deer 
Island. 

Order authorizing the establishment of new tele- 
graph lines between the several police stations and 
the City Hull, at an expense not exceeding ,$3500; to 
be charged to the appropriation for Police. 

The order to divide the portions of Fifth, Sixth 
and Seventh streets at G street into East and West 
being on its passage, Alderman Emery offered the 
following as a substitute, which was adopted: 

Ordered, That the names of all the streets crossing 
Dorchester street between the Old Colony Railroad 
bridge and the water at the northerly end of said 
Dorchester street, be changed by prefixing the word 
"East" to the name of that portion of each of said 
streets on the easterly side, and the word "West" to 
that portion of each of said streets on the westerly 
side of said Dorchester street; and that said streets 
crossing Dorchester street as aforesaid be hereafter 
called and known with said prefixed words "East" 
and "West," as set forth above, and that the Super- 
intendent of Streets be directed to place street signs 
upon and number said streets in accordance there- 
with. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

The petitions of Currier, Trott & Co., James King 
and of Catharine Barrett, and the communication 
from the School Committee for additional primary- 
school accommodations in the Prescott District, 
were severally referred, in concurrence. 

The annual report of the Superintendent of 
Streets was ordered to be placed on file. 

The report (leave to withdraw on petition of Dan- 
iel W. Bugbee, to be paid for damages to his wagon 
by defect in Dorchester avenue, was accepted, in con- 
currence. 

The following orders were passed, in concurrence : 

Order to print an index to the Transcript reports of 
proceedings of City Council since first publication. 

Order to provide for clerical assistance in oflBce of 
Superintendent of Health. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF MEniDIAN-STREET BRIDGE. 

The election of David W. Doane as Superintendent 
of Meridian-street Bridge, in place of Reuben B. 



65 



BOAR33 OF ALDERMEN, 



Wendell, chosen by this Board, coming up, the Board 
proceeded to a further ballot, the result being as fol- 
lows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

. Necessary to a choice T 

Reuben B. Wendell 9 

Da-vid W. Doaue 3 

Mr. Wendell was again declared to be elected, in 
non-concurrence. 

ELECTION OF AS3ISTANT-ASSESS0KS. 

The election of James Healy and Artemas R. . 
Holdeu as first assistant-assessors, in place of James 
Dennie and Theophilus Burr, chosen by this Board, 
coming up, the Board proceeded to a ballot, resulting 
as follows: 

W^hole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 1 

James Dennie 10 

Theophilus Burr 6 

. James Healy 5 

Arftemas R. Holden 2 

.James K. Crowley 1 

Mr. Dennie was again declared to be elected, and 
there was no choice for the remaining vacancy. 
A second ballot resulted as follows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

■ James Healy. 7 

TheophlhisBurr 3 

•Artemas K. Holden 2 

Mr. Healy was declared to be elected, in concur- 
retace. 

The report and order to authorize $5000 to be 
transferred from the appropriation for Public Lands 
to. that of Printing; from that for widening Tremont 
street, IS.'iOO, and for Widening Streets, ,$eO0O, to 
that for City Hospital, came up amended so as to 
authorize the Auditor to make any transfers necessary ■ 
to balance his accounts at the close of this financial 
year. . . 

Alderman Hulbert stated that as he moved the 
amendment to strike out the last clause, which was 
passed in the Board of Aldermen, he had seen the 
Auditor in relation to the matter, and on the explan- 
ations made by him, he was willing to vote for its 
restoration, although he believed that the working of 
the order as a precedent is not wise. 

The amendment of the Council in giving authority 
to the Auditor, as proposed, was concurred In. 

THE QUESTION OF CAEEIAGE HIRE. 

The following matter was considered: 

Non-concurrence by the Common Council to strike . 
out from the following order the words "or for car- 
riage hire": 

'•Ordered, That from and after this date, no com- 
mittee shall approve, nor shall the Auditor audit, nor 
shall the Treasurer pay, any bill contracted by any 
committee of the City Council, or of either branch, 
or any member thereof, or any bill contracted by any 
member of the City Council, for refreshments of any 
name or nature, or for carriage hire, unless said bill 
is contracted under a special vote passed prior to con- 
tracting the same." 

.Alderman Power moved that the Board adhere to 
Ifes foriner action. 

Alderman Quincy hoped that the Board would re- 
cede from its amendment and concur with the Coun- 
cil. It was well known that the Board had not con- 
templated the abolition of the reasonable privilege of 
obtaining proper meals at the city's expense, but had 
desired to interpose a check against the repetition of 
past abuses, — abuses for which, in his opinion, the 
upper branch was the most responsible. But the low- 
er branch had seen fit to present to the Board the al- 
ternative of either abandoning the attempt to cheek 
an abuse or to agree to the entire abolition of the 
privilege, to which was added— which made the pill 
. yet more unpalatable — necessary carriage hire for 
committees ordered on duty. Which of these alter- 
natives the lower branch desired the Board to adopt , 
he left the public to infer, but was clear in his own 
mind that both duty and dignity alike required the 
acceptance of the latter. Though it seemed reasona- 
bl.e that the city should provide transportation for 
committees on duty, yet he would cheerfully assume 
.his share of the expense, rather than have it said that 
■ this talk had been for buncombe and that the Board 
w(jre glad of an excuse to leave matters where they . 
found them. 

Alderman Power said he could not vote for any 
measure . of this kind, for it was clear to his mind 
that it would be detrimental to the interests of tax- 
payers, and the city business could not be done 
without the use of carriages. They could get along 
very well without refreshments, but the gentlemen 
of the Common Council knew that carriage hire was 
necessary, and if they were sincere in measures of 
reform they should concur with the Board. He could- 



not see how they could refuse to concur, if sincere, 
and he hoped the Board would adhere to its former 
vote 

Alderman Hulbert said the subject was worthy of 
all the consideration that had been given to it. He 
would take it for granted that the members of the 
Council were sincere, and he should be very sorry, 
after all that has transpired, to have this all end in 
nothing. It would be recollected that, last week, for . 
reasons given by him, he voted in favor of retaining"' 
the carriage hire, biit as the Common Concil had, by 
a large vote, decided differei..tly, he hoped the Board 
of Aldermen would concur with the Council. Such 
had been his opinion of the evil heretofore existing " 
in the City Government that he would cheerfully con- 
cur with the Council and let carriage hire take the 
same course that refreshments had. 

In accepting office, the contract required that they', 
should give their time to the city without compensa- 
tion, and the additional extra charge for carriage hire , 
was not worth considering. It would be a personal 
relief to them to do away with all the expenses which 
had brought reproach upon the City Government. 
They proposed to give up refreshments, and he was 
ready to pay his own carriage hire and any other ex- 
penses which may be necessary. To settle the ques- 
tion would be worth more than money. If experi- 
ence teaches anything, the giving up of all such ex- 
penditures would leave them free, and relieve them 
from the embarrassment which heretofore had exist- 
ed. He was heartily in favor of economy, and hoped 
the Board would concur with the Council. 

On motion of Alderman Quincy, the yeas and nays 
were ordered on the motion, and the motion to ad- 
here was carried, by a vote of 8 to 4, as follows: 

Yeas— Bigelow, Brown, Clark, Cutter, Emery, Gaf- 
field, Gibson, Power. 

Nays— Hulbert, (Juincy, Say ward, Stebbins. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Cutter from the Committee on Paving, ■ 
reported no action necessary on petition of Catharine 

E. Sullivan, for grade at JN'bs. 83 and 8.5 Cove street. 
Accepted. 

Aldeiman Power, from the Committee on Sewers, to 
whom was referred the petition of Aaron D, Webber 
for abatement of assessment for a sewer in South 
street, reported that no action is necessary. Accept- 
ed. 

Alderman Sayward, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of licenses, as follows:- 
Warren-street Chapel Association, for leave to hold a- 
festival at Music Hail. Feb. 22; Andrew Hull, to give 
a dramatic entertainment at Sumner Hall, Feb. 22; 
Joseph B. Sheerin, to give a literary entertainment at 
St. Mary's Church, Feb. lfl-20; James Stevenson, tt> 
give a variety entertainment at the St. James Thea-' 
tre, March 1; Joseph Hooker, Post 23, G. A. E., to 
give a dramatic entertainment at the St. James Thea-- 
tre, for one week from March 3; Edmund E. SafEord, • 
as an auctioneer; also licenses to twenty-six news- 
boys, three intelligences offices, two dealers in sec' ■ 
ond-hand articles, one pawnbroker, and to sundry 
persons as victuallers, for billiard licenses and wagon 
licenses. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Sayward, from the same committee, re- 
ported leave to withdraw severally on petitions Of 

F. W. Howard for leave to keep an intelligence 
office at 616 Washington street: J. Rufiis Long, for- 
license as a pawnbroker at 3 Tremont row; W. J. 
Siillivan and others for leave to give a sparring en- 
tertainment at corner of B Street and Broadway. 

Severally accepted. 

Alderman Sayward, from theCommittee on Health, 
reported in favor of stables, as follows: John Brad' ; 
ley, to occupy a wooden stable for two horses on- 
Shelton street, near Adams street. Ward Ki; E. W. E. 
Thompson, to occupy a wooden stable for eight 
horses on Ward street, rear Parker street. Severally 
accepted. 

Alderman Sayward, from the Committee on Heallh, 
to whom was referred the petition of the Mass-achii- 
setts Homoeopathic Medical Society for further small- 
pox hospital accommodati(ms, and that homneopathfc 
treatment may he furnished to all persons desiringir 
in the smallpox hospitals under the ehartreof the CMty 
Government, made a report recommending that the 
prayer of the petitioners be granted, if considered 
expedient by the Board of Health, Accepted. 

The same committee rcjiorted reference to Commit- 
tee on Claims on the petition of Joseph K. and Mary 
J. Melcher, for damages on account of her being sent 
to the smallpox hospital and not having the small- 
pox. Accepted. 

Alderman Gibson, from the Joint Standing Cofn- 
mittee on the Survey and Inspection of Buildings, to 
whom was referred the jietition of Th( nms Gopin ex- 
le'ave to hurld an addition to a wooden building If r 



FEBRUARY 17 



1S73 



cceding the limit allowed by lavp, made a report, 
recommendino- the passao-e of "the following order: 

Ordered, That the Inspector of Buildings be au- 
thorized to issue a permit to Thomas (jogin to build 
m\ addition to a wooden building, in accordance with 
an application on file in the office of the Department 
for the (:^^u•vey and Inspection of Buildings. 

The report was accepted, and the order was passed. 

■Alderman Gibson, from the same committee, to 
whom was refei red the petition of Winchester & 
llight for leave to erect a wooden building on Dor- 
chester avenue and First street, beyond the legal 
dimensions, made a report recommending that the 
petitioners have 1 'ave to withdraw. Accepted. 

EEPORT OF C031MITTEB ON SALARIES. 

Alderman Stcbbins, from the Joint Special Com- 
mittee appointed to prepare and repoit to the City 
Council orders establishing the salaries of the several 
city oilicers for the year beginning (m the first day of 
April, A. D. 1873, having carefully considered the 
subject, would respectfully recommend the passage 
of the ac::ompanying orders! 

The only changes proposed in the salaries as at 
present established, are as follows: 

The allowance for clerk hire in the Treasurer's 
office is incieased $1600, another clerk being required 
to collect assessments for betterment, etc. 

The allowance for clerk hire in the Auditor's office 
is increased $700. 

The allowance for clerk hire in the City Clerk's 
office is increased $200. 

The salary of the Assistant-Clerk of Conimiltees is 
increased $250. 

■The salary of the Assistant-Messenger is increased 
$3C0. 

The salary of the City Surveyor is increased $EO0. 

The salary of the Superintendent of Health is in- 
creased $:300, 

The salary of the City Physician is increased from 
.$1500 to $300. Under the new organization of the 
Health Department, it appears that tlie entire time of 
the City Physician will be required in the service of 
the city daring the ensuing year. 

The alluwauce for clerk hire in the City Registrar's 
office is increased $lo(iO, the employment of an addi- 
tional clerk having been found necessary. 

The salary of the Superintendent of Streets is in- 
creased 1300. 

The salary of the Superintendent of Buildings is 
increased $:^00. 

The salary of the Chief Trii.mt Oflicer is increased 
$300. 

The allowance for clerk hire in the Assessors' De- 
partm;'nt is increase! ,f]O0O, 

The total amount of increase recommended is: on 
salaries, $;37.50; on clerk hire, $48(;0. 

■Under the order referred to the committee as a part 
of the unflnished business of last year, in relation to 
the rate of compensation which ought to be allowed 
to the Inspector of Provisions, it is recommended 
that the salary of that officer be fixed at the rate of 
two thousand dollars per annum, and an order to that 
eflect is included in the accompanying bill. 

The orders were read once. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman Gaffield— 
Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings 
be authoiized to pay a sum not exceeding |33J0, for 
the use of rooms of the Institute of Technology dur- 
ing tlie season of 1871-72. for the purposes of the free 
evening drawing schools; said sum to be charged to 
the appropriation for Sehoolhou-es. Public Build- 
ings. 

■ Alderman Gaffield, in ex])lanation. stated that, 
through an informality, this bill, which was justly 
incurred and owed by the city, was not paid last 
year. 

On motion of Alderman Power- 
Ordered, That notice be and licreby is given to the 
persons who have recently placed or caused lo be,' 
placed fences or other obstrnctioiiM across the "old 
road" lying easterly of Blue-Hill avenue and leading 
from Columbia street to said Bhv-Hill avenue, to re- 
move said fences and obstructi<>ns within fourteen 
days from the date of the passage of tliis order; and' 
in- default of the removal of said fen cs and obstruc- 
tions l)y said parties, the Superintend! nt of Streets 
is hereby directed to remove the same at the expense 
■ of said |)arties. 

•On motion of Alderuian Clark- 
Ordered, That the Auditor of Accounts be and he 
hereby is authorized to allow for payment to the 
City 'freasurer the sum of .$i;-J43 01, being the amount 
j)aid Iiy him on a writ of execution issued by th<i Su- 
perior Court, Suffolk County, January Term, 1873. in 
farvor of Sylvester Gardner and Rosanna Gardner, his 



wife, for injuries sustained by a defect in a highway; 
said amount to be charged to the appropriation for 
Incidental Expenses. 

FILLING UP LOW TBKRITOBY. 

Alderman Q.uincy moved that the order for the 
Mayor to petition the General Court for an act to 
take the low territory, bounded by Northampton, 
Eustis, Albany and Washington streets, and to raise 
the grade thereof, be taken from the table. 

Arderman Hulbert said if action was to be taken 
upon this subject '<e hoped it w()uld lie over, for 'he 
was not ready to act intelligently upon the subject. 

The Chair stated that debate was not in orC.er, and 
the motion to take up the order was carried. 

Alderman Quincy said he had objicted to the pro- 
posed filling up if a certain line of policy is to be 
pursued, but he had an order which he would offer as 
a substitute, and which would not commit the city to 
any particular policy. This order provides for the 
same course which was adopted by the city of Cam- ' 
bridge in an act passed by the Legislature of last year. 

The order was read as follows, and was adopted as 
a substitute for the original order; 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayoi be requested to 
petition the General Court now in session for the 
passage of an act authorizing the City Council of 
Boston to require the owners of lands in said city, 
the surface of which is below the grade of fourteen ' 
feet above mean low water, to raise the grade of 
said lands, and of ail private streets, courts and ways- 
thereon, with reference to the complete drainage 
thereof; and in case the owners fail .so to do, witliiu 
& reasonable time, the city shall be authorized to 
enter up@n and raise said lands to a suitable grade, 
the expenses incurred thereby to constitute a lien 
upon said lands. 

An order to release to Samuel B. Pierce tke parcel 
of 8880 square feet of land discontinued from a part 
of Forest-Hill avenue, adjoining an estate of said es- 
■tatc, upon the said Pierce conveying to the city the 
parcel of 8;J20 squai-e feet of land taken from an es- 
tate of his CO widen said avenue, was referred to the 
Committee on Streets. 

ADDITIONAL ACCOMJiODATlONS FOE CITY OFPICEES. , 

Alderman Sayward moved to take from the table 
the report and order to hire the Missionary Building 
in Pemberton square, at an annual rent of $70(0. for 
city purposes. 

The motion was carried, and the order was consid- 
ered. 

Alderman Halbert said that since the leport was" 
made he had been through all the places in the City 
Hall, and were it not for the necessity for economi.z-' 
ing the expenditures of the city, he coukl not. vote 
for it- He was satisfied that there were accommoda- 
tions la this hall for any number of committees. If' 
requiiied, they should double up, for it could not be 
necessary ill these days that they should ail have 
separate rooms. The rent for the proposed building 
was $7000. and while there was room for half a dozen, 
committees here, there is room for a half dozen more' 
at the Charity Building. 

Alderman Sayward said he did not know what the' 
Aklerman meant by saying there was room for com- 
unittees, and he asked does he not know we have no; 
control over the Charity BureanV 'There was a 
necessity for further room for the accommodation of 
various departments of the City Government. The 
City CouEcil had passed an order to provide that the 
Treasury Department shall be more safe, and to do 
this it w<»uld be necessary that a portion of the room' 
of the Board of Directors for Public Institutions 
(rliould be taken up. The Board of Health is now in, 
SI confined room, and the Assessors want more room- 
for their accommodation. 

The bniiding it was proposed to lease would pro- 
vide accommodation f<ir all parties for some years to 
come. The City Solicitor would be provided rooms, 
in it, which would be a saving of the rent now paid 
of $2800 and taxes, and these r(«)ms now occupied by, 
iiini can be readily let. In this matter he had no in-'' 
terest other than the oonveuience of officers requir- 
ing more room. 

Alderman Hulbert said lie had a book which con- 
tained the record of the u.se of every rvoin \i, this' 
building; and there was not the least difficulty in 
accommodating all the oflices, with certain changes, 
and not an elbow nee<l be hit. That rooms should be' 
had for the Board of Dir<!Ctors and others outside of 
the building, was not at all necessary. 

AiderniMu Gthsoii believed there was room enough 
in the City Hall (o make every department as conj- 
fortable as can be expected. The Inspector of Milk, 
for instance, could be ))ut ink) (he fire-alarm loom, 
and othere could double up if necessary. This would 
be more convenient than to go up "to some other 



67 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



plane. Tliey had got to begin somewhere to econo- 
mize, for they had talien ttie contract to save the 
money of the city. All say they have no room, but 
they could get along with 'what they have. The call 
for rent of the leased cuilding was $70U0, it would but 
be $lo,UOO before they got tlirough with it, in fitting 
it up and the care of it. The cost for ten years would 
be $i5U,000. 

Alderman Sayvvard reminded the Alderman that 
two years ago he said there was no more room for 
new offices. If they were to go on in the way pro- 
posed of crowding offices to save expense, then they 
should crowd schools to save new houses. This was 
not the way in which they would do their own busi- 
ness. 

Alderman Gibson replied that there was plenty of 
room in the Charity Building, which was not half 
filled up. 

Alderman Sayward said there was not plenty of 
room in that building, besides the city had no control 
over it. 

Alderman Clark stated that he went over the Char- 
ity Building and found various rooms unoccupied, 
but they were not suitable for the Board of Directors 
for Public Institutions, nor for the Boaed of Health. 
which were the two most important to be provided 
for. The Inspector of Milk and some others might 
be accommodated there, yet it was true, as had been 
said, the City Government had no control over the 
building. 

Alderman Power believed the accommodations for 
the Board of Directors for Public Institutions were 
ample. The room of the Inspector of Milk might be 
occupied by the Board of Health. It was proper to 
economize in these things, and these offices could be 
as well accommodated as they had for the past five 
years. There wei'e many things in which expense is 
more needed. 

Aldei-man Gibson believed the Board of Health 
could be accommodated in the Charily Building, up 
two flights. They were well paid for their services, 
and could go up stairs, and he had it from the parties 
down stairs that the rooms above could be had. 
There was an abundance of other lOoms in the build- 
ings, now full of stragglers of all ages. The Board 
of Directors for Public Institutions would prefer 
rooms there rather than come up stairs here. 

Alderman Gaffield said he would make a statement 
from his personal knowledge, that in consideration 
of a certain sum contributed toward the erection of 
the Charity Building, the Overseers of the Poor had 
the exclusive charge of it. It was established to save 
money, but on a friendly conference to save money 
he had no doubt some arrangement could be made 
for the use of the rooms. 

Aldei-man Gibson said he would like to know 
■whether the city had any control of that building, for 
it was not the way to do business to spend a large 
sum of money for a building and have no couti-bl 
over it. He would like to have the order lie over that 
they may see how it is. 

Alderman Sayward replied that the Alderman 
might have known how it was. They could not use 
the building without the consent of the Overseers of 
the Poor, but, as Alderman Gaffield said, the Overseers 
in a conference might consent. In the changes pro- 
posed, some should go out of this building. The 
hiring of the building could be no detriment to the 
city, for the rent of the City Solicitor's room of $2800 
would be saved, and changes could be made which 
would be for the good of the Government. 

Alderman Emery said he went over the Charity 
Building with Alderman Gibson. The unoccupied 
rooms were l)adly arranged for anything which was 
needed. In the matter of control he satisfied him- 
self that the Overseers of the Poor had the charge of 
it in concurrence with the City Council. He was de- 
sirous of economy, and if they could get along as 
they were now he would be glad to do so. 

Alderman Gibson said there was one i oom in the 
Charity Building which was occupied two hours a 
week by a gentleman out of town. They had better 
get hold of the building if they could, for it had not 
been half occupied since it was built. 

Alderman Clark denied that there was any conflict 
in relation to the use of the Charity Building, and the 
passing of an order to find out in whose control it 
was would be reflecting on the best men who had 
anything to do with the City Government. The 
looms up stairs were not objectionable for some 
uses, but if the Board of Health were to go there, to 
whom smallpox patients might be sent, or persons 
go to learn of such patients, or persons go there to 
make complaints of nuisances, it might be objection- 
able to ladies interested in the Charity Bureau, some 
of the best people who frequently go to that build- 
ing for the benefit of the poor. 

It would not be right to force anything objection- 
able upon people who work for nothing for the city. 



The rooms would not answer either for the Board of 
Directors for Public Institutions. So far as related 
to accommodations in the City Hall, he did not be- 
lieve it would be large enough many years longer, and 
hoped the city would gi'ow so as to require its en- 
largement to double its present size. If the city was 
to hire the building proposed at a rent of $7000, and 
use it, he hoped the order would be laid over, and a 
stateirient be made of what changes it was designed 
to make. 

Alderman Sayward did not think it necessary to 
lay the order over for that purpose. The Board of 
Directors were well enough accommodated now, but 
their accommodations would be curtailed by the im- 
provements for the Treasury Department. The 
building to be leased was peculiarly adapted for the 
purpose, and the parties wished the city to decide at 
once. It was necessary to lay the order over, and it 
could be as well settled now as at any time. 

Alderman Gibson thought it strange that it should 
be assumed as a reflection upon others because they 
wished to know their rights. He thought now was 
the time to know the rights of the city m the Charity 
Building. 

Alderman Sayward repeated that the city had not 
the least control in that building, yet the Alder- 
man had been in the City Council three years, and on 
the Committee on Public Buildings, and had not yet 
learned the fact. 

Alderman Gaflield stated that he was on the com- 
mittee which purchased the land for the building, 
and through the influence of the Overseers of the 
Poor $20,000 was contributed. Not less than $.50,- 
000 was saved the first year by means of it, and the 
building and land had been saved in seven years by 
it. An ordinance was adopted to put the building in 
charge of the Overseers of the Poor, and he should be 
sorry to have any order of inquiry adopted in relation 
to the control of it. 

Alderman Power said it was not the question as 
to who had the control of the Charity Building, but 
the necessity for additional accommodations. The 
Board of Health was the only one for whom accom- 
modations were required. The Board of Directors 
for Public Institutions had ample room for iieveral 
years, and the committees ccnildget along for two or 
three years just as well as they had done. The room 
of the Inspector of Milk could be used for the Board 
of Health, for his duties were not arduous, and he 
could be easily taken care of. Under present cir- 
cumstances they wen! not warianted in running more 
in debt, and it would not be $7000 only, but $27,000, 
which would be the cost of the hiring of the build- 
ing. It seemed to him they could get along without 
incurring this expense. 

Alderman Sayward thought it singular that this 
question was not understood. Three orders had 
been referred bj; the City Council to the Committee 
on Public Buildings for distinct rooms, and on the 
best endeavors which the committee could make, 
they have found these rooms. If anything better 
could be done they would like to hear of it. 

Alderman Power believed there were plenty rooms 
in the City Hall. The Assessors could getalong until 
we could better afford enlarged accommodations, and 
others could be provided for as they had been. 

Alderman Hulbert said there were fine rooms in the 
City Hall used as lumber rooms, and he could not see 
his way clear to vote for the order. Every depart- 
ment had all the accommodations needed and each 
could be comfortable without going outside of the 
building. Unimportant departments occupy fine 
rooms, and changes could be made so that they would 
not need another inch of room. 

Alderman Sayward begged to differ from the Alder- 
man. It would not do to put the Board of Directors 
up stairs, for it was not the board alone but the peo- 
ple who were to be accommodated. 

Alderman Power suggested that the Inspector of 
Buildings might be put up stairs. 

Alderman Sayward believed such would be a very 
inconsistent change, for many mechanics might be 
required to go up to the office forty or fifty or one 
hundred times a day. The Inspector might go up, 
but the public A'ould be incommoded. 

Alderman Power moved an indefinite postpone- 
ment of the order. 

Alderman Clark hoped the order would be laid 
over one week, and the motion was modified to that 
effect. 

Alderman Sayward hoped neither motion would 
prevail. If the order was to be killed, it might as 
well be killed now. It would not in the least be a 
bad speculation, in hiring the rooms, and as so much 
woulcl be saved in junketing, the expense would not 
be large. 

Alderman Clark said it was not his object in having 
the order laid over to kill it. He should object to 
having the Directors for Public Institutions or th« 



FEBrtUARY 17, 1873 



68 



Board of IR'nltli go up etaii's with the attciuliints of 
smallpox patients or other olyoctioiiahle characters. 
If there ^xas so imich room in the huilding as hart 
l)een stated, lie should be glad to know it, and would 
like to know what changes it was proposed to 
make. 

Alderman Sayward indicated some of the changes 
which might be made. Should the Directors of I'nb- 
lic Institutions be removed elsewhere, their rooms 
could be occupied by the Board of Health, which 
would be suitable for their use. The room of the 
Inspector of Milk might lie used as a committee 
room, and the Inspector provided for in Pemberton 
square. More room was needed for the Assessors, 
and more rooms was needed for the use of commit- 
tees. 

Alderman Gibsen stated that in liis expIoratron.s 
with the Alderman who v\'(mt with liim, they found two 
rooms in the lower end of the Court House which 
were occupied by some one in the country occasion- 
ally. 

Alderman Sayv^'ard replied that they had no right 
to occupy the Court House for the city's use. 

Alderman Stebbins inquired what became of the 
rooms of the Register of Deeds now that he is to go 
into new quarters. 

Alderman Sayward replied that tlie rooms were all 
occupied by the Register, tlie old as well as the new 
ones, and a lease had been made for fifteen years for 
additional accommodations. 

Alderman Gibson said they went through that as 
well as other buildings, but they had not a foot of 
room to spare. They spent half a day in their 
.searches, without any dinner, and all the occupants 
claimed tliey had no room that was not needed. 
There were those rooms, which a man in the county 
occupied an honr a week. 

Alderman Sayward inquired whether the Alderman 
visited the building which it was proposed to hire? 

Alderman Gibson replied that he had not. 

Alderman Qnincy said the debate had satisfied him 



that there was no exigency for the hiring of the 
building proposed, and they might as well kill the 
order now. 

Alderman Clark ol)jected, for he did not know what 
was needed. He had not been to the building in 
Pemberton square. 

Alderman Emery said he searched industriously for 
rooms, and he lioped the order would be laid over. 

Alderman Sayward stated that if they wished to 
see the rooms in Pemberton square, they were open 
every day. 

Alderman Clark hoped the order would be laid over 
and specially assigned. 

Alderman Power had no objection to laying over the 
order, but not for the purpose of visiting Pem- 
berton square. If suitable rooms were needed out- 
side, the Parker House would be better and be more 
convenient. He could not see the necessity or exi- 
gency for hiring the rooms. 

Alderman Gibson believed there was room enough, 
if they had mind enough to determine tlie matter. 
Suitable accommodations could be provided in the 
City Hall, and the«-e were those who would take them 
if the present occupants were not satisfied. 

The motion to lay over and assign to Monday next, 
4'/^ o'clock, was carried. 

ORDER OP NOTICE. 

On the proposed rebuilding of the common sewer 
in Summer street. Hearing on Monday next, Feb. 
24, 4 o'clock. 

ORDER.*: READ ONCE. 

On motion of Alderman Clark, orders to pay James 
M. Beebe $16,374 for land taken for widening streets; 
Caroline M. Wheelwright ,$29,000, for land taken to 
widen Water street; John N. Wenzell $.oll5, for land 
taken to widen Summer street; Margaret N., wife of 
S. A. Britton, $.32.3 .50, for land taken on Blue-Hill 
avenue. 

Adjourned. 



69 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Proceedings of the Oommon Council, 

FEBRUARY 30, 1873. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common Coun- 
cil was held this evening, at 7>^ o'cl'ock, E. O. Shep- 
ard, the President, in the chair. 

On motion of iMr Thacher of Ward 15. the roll was 
called when the following-named members answered 
to their names : 

Abbott, Barnes, Boardman, Brennais, Burditt, Burt, 
Catou, Collins, Cndworth, Dacey, Darrow, Dean, 
Denny, Ed^vards, Platley, Harrington, Mine, Holmes, 
Jones, Kelley, Kingsley, Martin, McCue, McKenney, 
Pease, Perkins, Pickering, Powers, Prescott, Shaw, 
Thacher, Tower, Upham, Warren, Wells, West, 
Weston, Wilbur, Woods, Woodward — 40. 

A quorum of members was announced to be pres- 
ent. 

PAPERS PROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The petitions of William R. Clark and others, 
trustees, the Trustees of the Museum of Fine Arts, 
Josephine Leary, William Whittaker, Lydia A. Edge- 
comb, Robert Johnson, Charles J. McKay, and of 
Patrick Cunningliam, were severally referred, in con- 
currence. 

The annual report of the City Engineer and the 
Quarterly report of the Hayweigher of the North 
Scales were severally ordered to be placed on file. 
The following reports were severally concurred in ; 
Report of reference to the Committee on Claims of 
the petition of Joseph K. and Mary J. Melcher, to be 
compensated for damages on account of her mission 
to the Smallpox Hospital, she not having that dis- 
ease. 

Reference to the Committee on Streets of ' an order 
authorizing the Mayor to release to Samuel B. Pierce 
a parcel of 8880 square feet of land, discontinued 
from Forest-Hill avenue, on the terms and conditions 
set forth in said order. 

Report granting the petition of the Massachusetts 
Homoeopathic Medical Society, that immediate meas- 
ures he taken to erect additional hospitals, etc., if 
found expedient by Board of Health. 

Report (leave to withdraw) on petition of Winches- 
ter & Eight, for leave to erect a wooden building he- 
yond the legal dimensions on Dorchester avenue and 
First street. 

The following orders were severally passed, in 
concurrence : 

Report and order authorizing a permit to be issued 
to Thomas Gogin to build an addition to a wooden 
building. 

Order authorizing $3320 to be paid for the use of 
the rooms of the Institute of Technology, during the 
season of 18'71-2, for the purpose of free evening 
drawing schools. 

Report and order for the Committee on Ordinances 
to report an ordinance that the Port Physician be 
either the Physician or the Assistant Physician, as 
the Directors for Public Institutions may elect, for all 
the city establishments on Deer Island. 
The following order was read once: 
Order that the Auditor of Accomits be authorized 
to allow for payment to the City Treasurer, $1343 01, 
the amount paid by him on an execution in favor of 
Sylvester Gardner and Rosanna, his wife, for injuries 
from a defect in a highway. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF MERIDIAN-STREET BRIDGE. 

The certificate of the election of Reuben B. Wen- 
dell as Superintendent of Meridian-street Bridge, in 
place of David W. Doane, chosen by this boaru, was 
read, when the Council proceeded to an election, with 
the following result: 

Whole number of votes 50 

Necessary to a choice 26 

David W. Doane 25 

Reuben B. Wendell 25 

There was no choice. 

The second ballot resulted as follows: 

Whole number of votes 54 

Necessary to a choice 28 

Reuben B. Wendell 31 

David W. Doane 23 

Mr. Wendell was declared to bef elected, in concur- 
rence. 

ELECTION OF A FIRST ASSISTANT-ASSESSOR. 

The certificate of the election of James Dennie, in 
place of Artemas R. Holden, chosen by this Board as 
a First Assistant- Assessor, was read, when the Coun- 
cil proceeded to an election. 



The result of the ballot was as follows: 

Whole number of votes 57 

Necessary to a choice 29 

Artemas R. Holden 28 

James Dennie 12 

James K. Crowley 11 

Theophilus Burr 5 

H. N. Holbrook 1 

A second ballot resulted as follows: 

Whole number of votes 55 

Necessary to a choice 28 

Artemas K. Holdon 86 

James Dennie 10 

James K. Crowley 5 

Theophilus Burr 3 

H. N. Holbrook 1 

Mr. Holden was again declared to be elected, in 
nonconcurrence. 

The amendment to order concerning the taking of 
territory bounded by Northampton, Eustis, Albany 
and Washington streets, requesting the Mayor to 
petition for an act authorizing the City Council to 
require owners of lauds in Boston, the surface of 
which is below the grade of fourteen feet alDove 
mean low water, to raise the grade thereof, and of 
private streets, courts and ways therein, for the pur- 
pose and on the conditions named in said order, was 
taken up for consideration. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward tt presented a remonstrance 
from Edward I. Browne for himself and co-trustee, 
under the will of Augustus Thorndike, protesting 
against the measure as an injustice, inasmuch as a 
large portion of said territory under their charge was 
once drained, and the drain had been broken down 
by the raising of the grade of Harrison avenue, and 
for the overflow of the territory they were indicted, 
and at an expense of $3000 they filled up the low ter- 
ritory, doing all they were required to do in the 
premises. 

The remonstrance was ordered to be placed on file, 
and the amendment was concurred in. 

CARRIAGE HIRE. 

The adherence of the Board of Aldermen to their 
amendment to strike out "or for carriage hire" in 
the order concerning refreshments, etc., came up for 
concurrence. 

Mr. Wilbur of Ward 9 moved an indefinite post- 
ponement of the order, which was lost, by a vote of 
23 to 25. 

Mr. Dean of Ward 12 regarded it as undignified to 
bandy this order back and forth between the branch- 
es. In its present form the measure could have ef- 
fect only for the present year. If intended to be per- 
manent, it should be made a restriction in the rules 
and orders, but as it now is, it must be taken up again 
anether year. If the principle was right that car- 
I'iage hire should not be allowed, then the provision 
should not be restored again. It was sufticient to 
say that the matter should have a careful considera- 
tion. The exclusion of carriage hire was due to this 
branch, and if carried out it would interfere with the 
successful prosecution of the business of the city. It 
was certainly worthy of the consideration of the 
Council, and as other matters required their atten- 
tion, to give more time for such consideration, he 
moved to lay the order on the table. 

The motion was carried. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were severally read a second 
time and passed : 

Order for flags to be displayed on the public build- 
ings and grounds and a national salute to be fired at 
East Boston, South Boston, the city proper, Roxbury 
and Dorchester, on the anniversary of the birthday 
of George Washington. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Health be au- 
thorized to employ a principal clerk and such assist- 
ants as the Committee on Health may deem necessary 
for his department. 

Report and order authorizing a loan of $10,000 in 
addition to the amount appropriated for engine 
house, Ward 14. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

P. Campbell & Son, for leave to make an addition to 
their wooden buildings beyond the legal limits. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Survey and Inspection of 
Buildings. 

E. Ca Drew and others, for a fire-alarm box on 
Commonwealth Hotel, corner of Worcester and 
Washington streets, and a communication from the 
Board of Engineers recommending the same. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Fire Alarms. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Burt of Ward 16, from the Committee on Fire 
Department, reported leave to withdraw on petition 
of Pearson Brothers and others. Accepted. 



FEBRUARY 







1873 



70 



Mr. Denny of Ward 9, from I lie Committee on Leg- 
islative Mattei'8, on the pavt of tiie Common Council, 
who were instructed to take the necessary steps to 
secure an amendment of the act relating to "the erec- 
tion, occupation and use of stables in the city of Bos- 
ton, so as to require the approval of the City Council 
hereafter, instead of the Board of Aldermen, made a 
report that if it should be found desirable to make 
any change in the present arrangement, the (commit- 
tee are of opinion that the BoaYd of Health should 
have control of the matter; and they would therefore 
recommend that the order be referred to the Joint 
Committee on Legislative Matters, with authority to 
take such action as they deem expedient. Accepted. 

ORDER PASSED. 

On motion of Mr. Prescott of Ward 9 — 

Ordered, That in consideration of the payment 
of $8000 by the Boston & Albany Railroad 
Company, his Honor the Mayor be authorized 
to give a release and discharge to said corpora- 
tion from all claims and demands for damages, 
costs and expenses to the estates situated upon 
the westerly side of Washington street, between 
Chapman street and Orange street, on account of the 
raising of the grade of said Washington street or 
Orange street and Castle street, under the order of 
the Board of Aldermen, approved the 9th May, 1870, 
and the indenture between the City of Boston and 
the Boston & Albany Railroad Company, bearing 
date the 9th of May, 1870, so far as the said indenture 
applies to the said estates. 

Ordered, That the order passed March 15. 1872, au- 
thorizing the Mayor to execute a release to the Bos- 
ton & Albany Railroad Corporation be and the same 
is hereby rescinded. 

Mr. Anderson of Ward 3 offered an order that the 
City Engineer be requested to inspect the arches of 
the towers on the Boston & Lowell Railroad Depot, 
and report whether, in his opinion, such arches are 
safe. 

On motion of Mr. Perkins of Ward 6, the order 
was refeired to the Committee on the Engineer's De- 
pertment. 

CONTESTED ELECTION CASE. 

The report on petition of William M. Flanders and 
Others, in relation to the seat occupied in this Board 
by George A. Shaw, iPrinted City Doc. No. 20, 1873), 
with the order, proposed as a substitute for said re- 
port, declaring said seat vacant, was taken up. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 6 said he did not differ with 
the committee as to the statement of facts, but dif- 
fered with them as to their conclusions. There was 
one witness to show that Mr. Shaw said he designed 
to return to Boston, yet not to Ward 5, and it would 
not be supposed that a man could go to Brookline 
and live there six years, and claim to have a domicile 
in Boston. Under the constitution, habitancy is 
defined as a place where a person dwelleth and hath 
his home, and the Cit}' Charter provides that no one 
can be chosen to the City Council who is not an in- 
habitant of the ward from which he is chosen. The 
conclusions of the committee were quoted by Mr. 
Perkins, upon ;which he remarked that he believed 
them to be in error in their interpretation of law. 

When a man moves into a place, he contended that 
the burden of proof was upon him to show that he is 
not a resident elsewhere. As applicable to this case, 
he cited the case of Holmes rs. Greene of Fall River 
for refusing to receive his vote: and although Mr. 
Holmes removed to Tiverton, temporarily, the court 
was of opinion that the evidence all pointed to Tiver- 
ton as his habitation. A mere naked declaration of 
intent was not sufficient to determine the question of 
domicile, but the evidence of intent should be taken 
in connection with other facts. The cases of Har- 
vard College rs. Gore, and Whitney vf, Town of 
Sherborn were also cited as having a bearing on the 
question. In the last-mentioned case it was held that 
as a man's residence must be somewhere, and as he 
had no intention of returning to Ashland, from 
whence he removed, the authorities of Sherborn had 
a right to tax him. 

When Mr. Shaw left Ward 5 he did not determine 
upon any length of stay in Brookline, or of his return 
to Ward 5. In .Sleeper vs. Page 1,5th Gray, it was 
held that when a debtor was absent from the State, 
not intending to return at any definite time, he had 
no domicile here. In an investigation of the subject 
he was surprised in looking up cases, to see how 
strongly they were against the conclusions of the com- 
mittee, and he could not stultify himself by voting to 
sustain tire report. The case of John C. Tucker, 
whose election was contested in the Council from 
Ward 3, was cited as applicable to this case, and in 
that Mr. Tucker resigned, knowing that he would be 
unseated. Many other authorities, he said, might 



also be cited to show the erroneous conclusions of the 
committee. 

Mr. Holmes of Ward (i .said the report was the 
result of the unanimous opinion of the committee, 
and it fell to his lot to draw it up. As to the facts in 
the case, his colleague had made one misstatement, 
that there was no evidence to show that Mr. Shaw 
intended to return again to Ward 5. On page 61, the 
testimony of Mr. Homer was that Mr. Shaw told 
him that he meant to keep his residence in Boston. 
The ease of Holmes rs. Greene he had examined, 
but it was not .sustained by decisions before or after 
it, and was not considered by lawyers as intelligible. 
It was not satisfactory, and Judge Bigelow being 
questioned upon it had not explained it. ' If the city 
solicitor was right, then the conclusions of the com- 
mittee were right. 

Mr. Dean of Ward 12 said they all had a simple 
duty to perform, from which they could not escape. 
He had no concern in bringing this question here, btlt 
must pass upon it conscientiously. Taking it away 
from the refinements of law, they would be compelled 
to say that the gentleman had not been a resident of 
Boston for six years, for where a man's habitation is, 
was where he dwelleth and has his home, where he 
eats, drinks and sleeps. Where a man has two resi- 
dences, two dwelling houses in each of which he lives 
a portion of the year, the fact and the intent must go 
together to determine his habitation. A bare and bald 
intent or itself amounts to nothing, for a man cannot 
create a home out of nothing. In what he had to say 
he had not the slightest intent to call in question the 
honor of the gentleman, for he did not doubt he be- 
lieved he could retain his residence in Boston. 

Mr. Dean cited the cases of Holmes ?•■«. Greene and 
Sleeper vs. Page, and urged that if the views of the 
committee were sustained, all of the members of the 
Common Council might remove to the neighboring 
towns, continue to represent the wards they moved 
from, and yet have no interests in common with the 
residents of the city. The strongest evidence given 
was that of Mr. Homer, who savs Mr. Shaw told him 
that he intended to return to Boston, but there was 
no fixed time of returning. On page H8 it is testified 
that he said he was in Brookline on account of his 
aged parents, or his wife's parents. He might stay 
there as long as they lived, when the law says there 
must be a fixed time to determine the quesiion How 
long were they to live, and if he could live there for 
that reason, and should assume that it is healthier 
there than in the city for his children, he might live 
there as long as his children might live. They might 
all go into the country, and so long as we or ttieir 
children live they might represent some ward in the 
city. 

it appeared that the gpntleman did return to Bos- 
ton in November, 1872, and the report shows that lie 
went to Ward 10 to reside. The case was just one of 
those where legal refinements throw no light upon it. 
He hoped, therefore, that they would settle it in ac- 
cordance with the plain constructions of law. 

Mr. Train of Ward 13 said that as a plain member of 
the committee, not a lawyer, he might possibly 
throw some light upon the report of the committee. 
The petitioners in every instance failed to show any 
evidence against the position occupied by Mr. Shaw. 
In the first draft of the question put to the City 
Solicitor the word "necessarily" was not in it, but 
the question put under the facts was, "was liis domi- 
cile lost or not?" to which the City Solicitor gave an 
emphatic "No." That fact settled the question in his 
mind. The evidence showed that Mr. Shaw refused 
to take part in meetings in Brookline, and that had 
weight in the case, the voters in Ward 5 voted for 
him for office, and if he had not had a legal residence 
there, why did they vote for him? 

Mr. Holmes said, in relation to the question of in- 
tent, Mr. Shaw said he meant to continue a resident 
of Boston. If nothing else than his denial of his 
residence in Brookline. it would be enough, but 
something more than that w as shown. 

Mr. Brackett of Ward 10 said the arguments of the 
gentleman against the report of the committee failed 
to convince him that it was not correct. There were 
certain presumptions in the case which should have 
weight. The people in Ward 5 elected him to the 
Council, and they knew what they \vere about. In 
the case of Holmes vs. Greene, the'facts were not as 
in this case. Had Mr. Shaw gone away and returned, 
and been refused a vote, then there would have been 
a similarity. But there was a different state of 
facts. 

Mr. Shaw had been recognized as having a resi- 
dence in Ward 5 by taxing him, continuing his name 
on the voting list, and by the people voting for him 
in sending him to the Legislature, and electing him 
to other offices. As reference had been made to rum- 
maging old law books, he had done something of 



71 



COMMON oouisroiL, 



that kind, and some of the cases he cited as having 
an applicatioQ to the question. West Boylston and 
Steriiug, in the ITtli Pi.;kering; Harvard College vs. 
Gore; sears v.i. Citv of Boston; Cochrane tw. City of 
Boston, 4th Allen; the last of which he regarded as a 
strong case, it being shown that Cochrane had his 
family residing in Boston two years, yet it was iield 
that nis residence was in JSIew Orleans. 

It had been charged, he said, that Mr. Shaw at- 
tempted to ride two horses, but he had always de- 
clined to call Brookline his residence, lie regarded 
the people as having some rights in this matter, and 
it was their affair, it they chose to elect Mr. Shaw to 
represent them. Even if they should elect him while 
not living there, it was not a very bad thing. In 
Ward 5 the population had greatly changed. From 
having been the residences of W^ebster and Everett 
and others of that class, the power of that class had 
diminished, and it was no disparagement of another 
class which was now greater there, to say that it v\as 
a good thing for them and others to be represented 
by those who do not reside there constantly. If the 
Council do as they ought to in relation to the law and 
the facts, they must sanction the report of the com- 
mittee. 

On motion of Mr. Jones of Ward 14, the ,yeas and 
nays were ordered on the question. 

Mr. Powers of Ward 4 said he had read the testimo- 
ny fully, and he could not see how the committee 
could come to any other conclusion than they did. 
The question of domicil had been a ditticulte one, and 
was often determined by juries under instruction of 
courts. Mr. Shaw had been called to Brookline on 
account of the infirmities of his wife's father and 
mother. There was no dispute that he had a resi- 
dence in W ard '5, and never acquired a residence in 
Brookline, and it was in evidence that he always in- 
tended to return. It was of no consequence that he 
spent a night in the ward on the last night in April, 
as it was common to see on the Back Bay that win- 
dows were boarded up on the 1st of May by those 
who left for the country to avoid taxation. There 
was great looseness in the law in regard to domicile, 
and he liked the bill which had been introduced into 
the Legislature to define it more clearly. 

Mr. Dean thought it strange logic in commending a 
bill which required a man's residence to be defined 
where he spent the greater portion of the year, and 
supposing it should he made a law, wliat effect would 
it have on the gentleman from Ward 5 ? What object 
could there be in such a law, when it is said that a 
man don't reside where he does reside ? It was said 
the people have rights, but the members of the Coun- 
cil must pass upon sucli questions, under oath, and 
if they believed in the rights of the people, jt was 
the only logic by which their rights could be sus- 
tained, that they be so in accordance with law. Mr. 
Dean cited other cases as bearing on the question. 

With reference to the case of Mr. Shaw, he did not 
doubt he thought he could retain his residence in Bos- 
ton, while living elsewhere, and thought it desirable 
for various reasons. But the constitution told them 
that a man belongs where he resides and has his 
home. Every member of the Council knows that 
very well. In regard to the first qnestioi put to Mr. 
Healy, it was either intended to cover the case of Jlr. 
Shaw, or it was not frankly put. Mr. Shaw might 
have taken the stand and settled the question. Mr. 
Healj^ virtually puts his residence in Brookline. In 
deciding the question, they had the constitution to 
guide them, and should be governed by it. 

Mr. Holmes stated that the word '•inhabitancy"' 
does not give light, but defining it is but working in a 
circle, and does not help us in the slightest degree. 
As to the fourth question to Mr. Healy it is not stat- 
ed properly, but was put to meet the conclusions to be 
reached at the earliest period. But it was found that 
.the facts were different from what appeared by ques- 
tion four. As to the matter of evidence, Mr. Shaw 
might have made a statement, and he offered himself 
to petitioners, who did not see fit to examine him, 
he did not know for what reason. He was perfectly 
ready to answer. As to the question of law, it only 
provides that there may be a definite intention to re- 
turn, but not at any fixed moment. The intention 
may be definite but the time indefinite. 



Mr. Bean referred again to tlie Sherborn case in 
the 12th Allen, with reference to the indefinite length 
of time or temporary residence att'ecting domicile. If 
indefinite, there could be no limit to it, and if Mr. 
Shaw had determined to come back, but that time 
was illimitable, he might have stayed away forever, 
and yet claimed to have been a resident of Ward 5, 
and represented it as long as he lived. When he did 
return it was to Ward 10, and there was no evidence 
that he intended to return to Ward 5. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5, in his own defence, denied 
that any evidence could be found to show that he de- 
signed to remain in Brookline so long as his wife's 
parents lived, and on the question of intent he pro- 
ceeded to answer the gentleman from Ward 12 in lan- 
guage of his own in the contested election against 
Melville E. lugalls. Senator from the Sixth Suffolk 
District. This he read from Senate document 140, 
1808. The argument madt; here was ditterent from 
that made at that time. Mr. Shaw further stated 
that he liad voted forty-nine times in twenty-five 
years, in the city, not a great distance from the 
IJnited States Hotel, and never anywhere else excei)t 
in the old Ward 5, when he was elected to the Coun- 
cil. In the present ward he had ever otherwise 
voted, under changes of boundaries, and had been 
elected to the liCgislature and to the Council from 
that ward, and had paid his taxes here and not in 
Brookline. 

Besides this, he had never taken any interest in 
matters in Brookline, and had never been in the 
Town Hall there but once and that to hear Mr. Derby 
on the subject of annexation. In the delicate position 
in which he had been placed, he would not have said 
anything here except for the attack upon him, and lie 
was ready to have answered any question which 
might have been asked of him when before the com- 
mittee. He had never doubted what the result of 
this contest would ))e, and would not have said any- 
thing but for the interference in his family affairs, 
which he assumed to be a piece of cruelty and inhu- 
manity on the part of those w ho were opposed to 
him. 

Mr. Dean denied that there had been any attack upon 
the gentleman from Ward 5, or any calling in ques- 
tion his motives. In what had been stated in rela- 
tion to his wife's parents, it related solely to his in- 
tent, and to sustain the point made by him he quoted 
from page 01, in which Mr. Shaw said he intended to 
stay there in Brookline "while the old folks 
lived,"' and if it was his intention to live there under 
such circumstances he had a right to live there while 
his children lived, and might live there always, and 
yet claim to represent this city in the Council, under 
which all the members of the Council might live out 
of town. 

In the case of Mr. Ingalls, he claimed that the case 
would not sustain the gentleman from Ward 5, for 
Mr. Ingalls had been in this State the five years pro- 
vided by law, during which he returned to Maine 
temporarily and kept school there. The fact that he 
paid a tax there and voted did not affect his residence 
here, for the law of Maine was different from that of 
Massachusetts in allowing a vote on a residence of 
three months, and in his views in relation to the posi- 
tion of Mr. Ingalls he was sustained by H. W. Paine, 
who was associated with him in the case. 

Mr. Holmes made a few additional remarks in rela- 
tion to the intent of Mr. Shaw in returning to the 
city, and closed by moving the previous question, 
which was sustained. 

The motion to substitute the order of Mr. Perkins 
that Mr. Shaw was not entitled to his seat, was lost, 
by a vote of 10 to 40. as follows: 

Yeas— Blackmar, Burditt, Caton, Dean, Flynn, Har- 
rington, Perkins, Thacher, West, Whiston — 10. 

Nays— Abbott, Adams, Anderson, Barnes, Bicknell, 
Bleiler, Boardman, Brackett, Brennan, Burt, Collins, 
Cudwoith, Dacey, Davis, Denny, N. Dohcrty, Flatley, 
Hall, Hine, Holmes, Jones, Kelley, Kingsley, Lamb, 
Marston, Martin, McCue, Page, Pease, Pickering, 
Powers, Prescott, Risteen, Train, Upham, Warren, 
Wells, Weston, Wilbur, Woodward — 40. 
The report of the committee was then accepted. 
Adjourned. 



73 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Froepe(liiia;s of tlic Board of AldermpH, 
FEBRUARY 34, 1878. 



The regular weekly meeting of tlie Board of Alder- 
men was held this afternoon, at four o'clock, Alder- 
man Cutter, the chairman, presiding. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Weigher of Coal — Giiman M. Hamilton. 

Special Police Officer — Frederick M. Stanley, for 
duty at Paneuil-Hall Market. 

Police Oflicers— Henry C. (ioodwin, as Sergeant of 
Police, at Station Nine; George P. (ireene. as Patrol- 
man. 

Undertakers — Caleb I. Pratt, Ricliaid Dillon. Con- 
stant T. Benson, William Coolcy, Lewis Jones, Da- 
vid Mardin, John W. Pierce, Nahum P. Whitney, Job 
T. Cole, William H. Brown, Benjamin P. Smith, 
Philip E. Field. John H. Peak, Jprciniah O'Snllivan. 
William E. Brown, James Haynes. ffobert S. G. Mar- 
den, Hugh Taylor, Jeremiah T inkham, William D. 
JRockwobd, Ira W. Orcutt. I'hilip Kennedy, George 
V. Field, Joseph S. Waterman, William Manning, 
John Heiutz, John Haynes. Joseph S. Blye, James 
Farrell. Ebenezer Bird, John W. Lavory, S. Gleason, 
George Johnson, Jr.. Samuel J. Crockett. Hyman L. 
Wiener, James Cotter. George A. Willard. J. B. 
Burke, Lewis L. Jones, John Fecncy, Hugh McCaf- 
frey. 

Stiperintendent of Lamps— George H. Allen. 

Superintendent of Faneuil Hall— Charles B. Rice. 

Superintendent Faneuil-Hall Market— Charles B. 
Rice. 

Inspector of Milk — Henry Faxon. 

Superintendents of Hay Scales — Nort>. Scales,Henry 
A. Davis: South Scale's, Levi Chadbourne: Soutli 
Boston Scales. John M. Johnson; East Boston Scales, 
John A. Brown: Highlands, Andrew W. Newman. 

Measurer of Grain — George P. Ray. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark— B. G. Prescott, Wil- 
liam Keith. Robert Hale. James C. Whitney, Thomas 
M. Haskell, J. B. Quimby. H. F. Lawrence, Stanley 
C. Burnham, William Jordan, Randall G. Morse, A. 
W. Burnham. Robert Vose, George E. Frost, Ebeu 
ezer Curtis, William Seaver, Jr., A, J. Wheeler, H. 
W. Crafts. Daniel E. Adams. 

Inspectors and Weighers of Bundle Iluy — Israel 
M. Barnes. Samuel B. Livermore. William S. Holmes, 
Jasper H. Eaton. William R. Inman. E. ('■. Dudley, 
Walter C. Bryant, J. T. Dalrymple, B. W. Harding. 
C. A. Upham, A.. J. Wheeler, libenezer Curtis, C. E. 
Stephenson. Aaron Bradshaw. 

Surveyor of Marble — Willi:iin B. Bayley. 

Inspectors of Petroleum and Coal Oils—Robert F. 
Means, jMathaniel Cleaves. 

Superintendent of Wasons and Trucks— Timothy 
R. Page. 

Superintendent of Hacks and Carriages— Eufus C. 
Marsh. 

Superintendent of Intelligence Cilices, etc.— Harri- 
son O. Read. 

Superintendent of Pawn Brokers— Ebenezer Shute. 

These several superintendents with all the powers 
of constables, except serving and executing civil 
process. 

Inspectors of Provisions— Charles B. Rice and 
Joseph B. Gibson. 

The confirmation of Chase Cole and nine others as 
Truant Officers being under consideration. Alderman 
Power said he had heard a great deal of talk about 
Truant Officers, and that the duties could .iust as 
well be performed by the police on the regular force. 
It would be well to liave the matter looked into, iiud 
if it was so, as stated, they ought to save the amount 
paid to these officers. He" moved that the nomina- 
tions be referred to the Committee on Police. 

The motion was carried. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND BErBBBED. 

Naylor & Co. and others, that the sidewalks of 
Kilby street be cleared of obstructions. 

N. C. Mnnson, for le.ave to cross a portion of Yar- 
mouth street with a rail track. 

Se^•erally referred to Committee on Paving, 

Winchester & Hight, for leave to erect a wooden 
building, not exceeding thirty feet in height, on Doi-- 
Chester and Foundry streets. Referred to Commit- 
tee on Survey and Inspection of Buildings. 

W. S. Pike, for leave to give cnteftamments of 
magic at East Boston, South Boston, etc. Referred 
to Committee on Licenses. 



Edward Spaulding & Bnmstead and others, occu- 
pants of Fort Hill stores, for abatement of tax or 
rent on said stores or land. Referred to Committee 
on Fort Hill Territory. 

Whitcorab & Potter, for additicmal compensation 
for construction of a wharf at Gallop \s Island. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Claims. 

John C. Haynes and others, for a sewer at the cor- 
ner of Berkeley and Appleton streets. Referred to 
Committee on Sewers. 

ANNUAL REPORT OP THE INSPECTOR OP BUILDINUS, 

The report of the Inspector of Buildings was laid 
before the Board in print. 

The report states that the number of permits issued 
last year by the Inspector was 1945— of which 419 w-ere 
for buildings of brirk or stone. (585 of wood, and 841 for 
repairs, alterations and additions. Of the brick and 
stone buildings erected, there wore 647 dwelling 
houses. 98 for mercantile purposes. 7.") dwellings and 
stores, H4 family hotels and tenement houses, 2ti 
stables, 2:3 mechanical, 7 public buildings, 18 stores 
and offices, 4 churches. The largest number, 263, was 
inW ard 15 the next, 127, in Ward 9. Of the whole 
numlier. 754 were witli Mansard roofs. 

Of the 1051 wood and frame buildings erected, or 
in process of erection, 768 were dwellings, 73 stables, 
46 dwellings and stores, 27 for storage.' 20 stores ancl 
offices, .35 mechanical. Of these 296 were in Ward 16, 
24(p in Ward 12, 116 in Ward 15, 110 in Ward 14, and 
21" in Ward 1. Of these 512 were with Mansard 
roofs. 

I lie number of violations, etc.. investigated and re- 
ported upon was ;387: 205 for violation "of statutes, 
and 1S2 for violalian of ordinance. Of these 86 were 
of woodwork against flues, 62 chimneys not plas- 
tered, 47 small sized timber, 38 walls not carried 
through roof, 23 building without permit. 23 insuffi- 
cient foundation, 15 erect"ing wooden buildings within 
building limits. 

The numlier of unsafe buildings, etc., examined 
and reported upon was 126, of which 60 were unsafe 
buildings, 46 unsafe chimneys. 8 each unsafe heating 
apparatus and defective flues, 2 each unsafe boilers 
and unsafe oven and wall. There were of these fiS 
secured, 10 removed, 25 rebuilt, 26 not completed. 

The number of fires repo/ted on. exclusive of the 
fire of November 9-10, was 216. 

instil na ted damage $291,719 

loss by tire of Nov. y-lU 13,218,850 

Total loss for 1872 813.510,569 

The fire of Nov. 9-10 burned over a territory of 

about sixty-five acres, containing about .5.50 estates 
and 776 buildings. It will be noticed that the esti- 
mat(^d loss by the great fire, given above, is less than 
estimates which have heretofore been made, owing to 
the fact that while former estimates included all 
i)uildings within the line of tlie fire as a total loss, 
allowance has been made, in making up the above 
estimates, for all buildings which were only partially 
destroyed or slightly damaged. 

As the probable causes of fires, there were attribut- 
ed as follows: 31 incendiary. 16 defective flues. 78 un- 
known, () children playing with matches, 5 overheated 
stoves, 2 defective stoves, 4 thawing of water pipes, 2 
overheated and unsafe ovens. 7 overheated furnaces 
and funnels defective, and 4 from defective chimneys, 
and 8 from combustible materials, new boilers, explo- 
sion*, overheating, etc., 5 spontaneous combustion, 
3 from forges, 2 from firecrackers, 1 hot ashes in barrel, 
7 gas burners and defective pipes, 2 kerosene lamps, 
1 by mice among matches, one each matches thrown 
in basement window and among waste paper, one 
lighted pipe in coat pocket, 5 defective stove pipes 
and near woodwork. 

Referring to the fire of November last, the report 
states that attention was called to the necessity of 
additional building regulations in January. 1872. and 
an extract is made from the report on the sub.iect. 
The Committee on the Department pi-epared amend- 
ments, which were submitted to the Legislature, but 
for reasons unnecessary to detail, failed to become a 
law. 

The report proceeds as follows: 

Immediately after the fire, the same committee 
was again called upon to prepare whatever amend- 
ments they felt were required to secure the futm'e 
safety of "the city, with the assurance that whatever 
they presented "would be acceptable. Ff)rtunately 
the committee was composed of practical men and 
builders of long experience, who well understood 
the requirements of the city, and who, as builders, 
would not be likely to approve of any measures 
which would be onerous or impracticable. They 
were urged to prepare a few amendments to the ofd 
lew, to be acted upon at the special session of th 
Legislature of 1872, leaving the bulk of the bill to b 



FEBRU AR Y 



1873 



73 



preseiiti^d in 1873; buthavina: tin' rojcicted bill ol' li^Ti 
a« a basis, and a years ex'pi'vienfo' in tbo nianagi?- 
nicnt. of Mil' department, they felt tbaf they could 
prepare a bill which would cover the whole a'rounil 
and avoid the necessity of again api)ealinii; to tin- 
Legislature. Accordingly, wilh the advice and assist- 
ance of some of the leading architects in the city, 
a bill was prepared and presented to the Legishitnre. 
Considering the excited state of public feeling at the 
time, the bill was much less stringent than might 
have been expected; but the committee, in preparing 
it, were careful not to incorporate anything \\hich 
they, as builders, could not stand by. 

This law, if carried out, will secure onr city from 
another disaster like that of last November, while, 
at the same time, it is less stringent in its provisions 
than the building acts of other cities. As might be 
expected, the law meets with opposition from some 
of our builders, and it is doubtful if one could be 
framed which would meet with their entire approba- 
tion. A provision-which one builder will coudemn 
as severe and stringent will be approved by another 
builder of equally good judgment and reputation. 
Each builder has his peculiar method of construc- 
tion, and any change from that method provokes 
criticism, and oftentnnes condemnation, simply he- 
cause it ditfers from his idea; while at the same time 
another builder will approve of any change which 
will secure a methodical manner of construction, and 
which will fix a standard alike for all. As all trades 
and professions disagree in opinions and theories, 
and in view of the impossibility of reconciling the 
different opinions, the public safety demands that a 
fair standard shall be fixed by which all shall abide. 
Some of the provisions of the present law might per- 
haps be safely modified or repealed, but, in tlie main. 
It is just what is needed for our city, and should not 
by any means be permitted to be we«liened. 

Since the fire the svrbjects of building wiaterials, 
fire-proof construction, methods of extinguishing 
fires, etc.. have received considerable attention, and 
this department has received numerous communica- 
tions on these subjects. .Xs far as seen, brick seems 
to be the only material which withstood the flames. 
Stone and iron were utterly destroyed by the intense 
heat, and the action of water caused its complete dis- 
integration. Marble was not fairly tested, the marble 
front on Washington street, whicli lias been alluded 
to as having successfully resisted the fire, being pro- 
tected by a backing of brick wliich received the full 
force of the flames. Marlile, however, will be exten- 
sively nsed in rebuilding, and of the sixty-eight 
"buildings on the burnt district, for whicli perniits 
have been granted, thirty-two will have marble 
fronts. But when exposed to the fury of such a con- 
flagration as that of last November, it matters little 
of what material a building is composed. Let a fire 
once get under such headway, and beyond the control 
of the Fire Department, and a few moments Mittice to 
reduce the building to ashes. Security, therefore, 
consists not in endeavoring to construct isolated fire- 
proof buildings, but in so constructing every building 
that a fire may be confined to the building in which it 
originated, even if that is destroyed. 

Buildings in process of erection, alteration, or re- 
pair have been inspected from time to time, during 
the year, and reports are made by the Assistant In- 
spectors daily. The additional number of Assistant - 
inspectors provided by the City Council will enable 
the department to exercise a more careful super- 
vision. A glance at the record of violations which 
have been reported upon will show the necessity of 
careful inspection, but it is gratifying to be able to 
report that these violatiors have been removed, in 
most cases, without resorting to legal measures. In 
one instance it was found necessary to prosecute a 
builder for not plastering his chimneys, and he was 
convicted and fined for his ofl'ence; and there are 
now In the hands of the City Soliciter a few cases in 
which legal proceedings have not yet been com- 
menced. In addition to the daily reports which are 
I'eceived on the progress of buildings, a final report is 
received upon the completion of eiich building, and 
put upon record. This record gives a description of 
the building, etc., and is often consulted by jiur- 
ohasers and others interested in real estate. A table 
appended, compiled from this record, will show the 
number of brick buildings completed during the 
year. 

Early in the year a careful examination was made 
of the several places of amusement in the city, and 
tlie condition of the heating apparatus, etc., in- 
spected. As a general thing, tlie condition of these 
places was found very satisfactory, and the few sug- 
gestions made to the proprietors were cheerfully com- 
plied with. 

Much improvement has been made in the ('onstruc- 
tion of wooden buildings during the year. The 
Building ordinance which went into effect January 1, 



1K73, specifics the minimum size of timbers, requires 
proper framing, and the building of suitable founda- 
tions. L'uder its provisions, "Ijalloon" framing has 
been done away with, and a more substantial class of 
buildings erected. The building limits remain un- 
changed, but during the year a petition has been re- 
ceived from citizens of Wards 7 and 12, supplemented 
by one from the presidents of the insurance compa- 
nies, asking that the limits be extended so as to in- 
clude these wards. These petitions have been re- 
ferred to the committee on this department, and 
doubtless will receive their early consideration. The 
number of wooden buildings in these wards is rap- 
idly increasing, permits for iil't having been issued 
lUiring the year. 

During tlie year John B. Roys has been appointed 
Assistant-Inspector, in place of Job T. Souther, re- 
signed. More clerical assistance is needed in the de- 
partment, and a Surveyor attached to it for the pur- 
pose of giving grades, etc. 

The report was ordered to be sent down. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The hearings on orders of notice on petitions of 
Joseph Watson, for leave to locate and use a steam 
boiler and engine at 127 Portland street; also on pe- 
tition of Bartlett & Richardson, for leave to locate a 
steam boiler at 389 Broadway, and on the proposed 
rebuilding of the Summer-street sewer, were taken 
up. No person appearing in relation thereto the re- 
ports were recommitted. 

HEARING ON REVOCATION OF RAILROAD LOCATION. 

The hearing on order of notice on the proposed rev- 
ocation of a right to lay tracks on Walnut avenue by 
the Metropolitan Railroad Company was taken up. 

Harvey Jewell, for the Metropolitan Railroad Com- 
pany, said he came here to say that the location was 
granted a long time ago, that tliere was no necessity for 
the track at the time, and there had been no demand 
for it by the residents on that street. Thwro was no im- 
mediate use for such track, and the corporation had 
no desire to extend their tracks, but they objected to 
a revocation of the right to lay them, not from a wish 
to avail themselves of it now, but they wished when 
the residents desired the facilities, that' they may have 
the privilege of furnishing them, and that it should 
not be granted to any other corporation. 

If he could have had an interview with the member 
of the Board who offered the order he could have 
assured him that what he desired to accomplish could 
be secured without its adoption, and with a consulta- 
tion with him and with the City Solicitor such an 
arrangement as he desires can be made. They were 
willing to agree that the street shall not be opened 
for the purpose of laying tracks without a permit 
from the Superintendent of Streets, and that a notice 
of ten, twenty or thirty days shall be gi\en. They 
only desired to preserve their rights, but would agree 
not to lay tracks in the streets without the wLshes of 
the inhabitants. Thej' were entirely willing to have 
the opening of streets to be subject only to proper 
notice, and if the report should be recommitted, an 
airangement would be agreed to to accomplish what 
tlie mover of the order desires. 

A petition was read from J. H. Chadwick and some 
forty others, against the laying of tracks in Walnut 
avenue, and in favor of tlie revocation of the right 
to lay such tracks by the Metropolitan Railroad 
Company. 

The report was recommitted, and the petition was 
referred to the committee. 

I'-NHNiSHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were severally read a second 
time and passed : 

Order to grade and macadamize Regent street, at a 
cost of 110,000. 

Order to pay Margaret N. Biittan $223 50, for land 
taken on Blne-llill avenue. 

Order to pay Jauie.s|M. Beebe .•i;l{i,;i74, for land taken 
by the city oii Otis street. 

'Order to pay Caroline M. Wheelwright $29,000, for 
land taken on Water street. 

Order to pay John N. Menzell, $5115, for land taken 
on Summer street. 

Order for change of sewer assessments, as follows: 

W. Eagle and Meridian streets— Abate $128 03 from 
East Boston Company and assess .$,5(i ilO upon Louisa 
A. Bntland, and $71 13 upon Georges P. Dudley. 
Abate $10 70 from C. C. Gilbert, and assess the same 
amount upon Edward S. Rand. 

Trenton street- .Miate $82 00 from East Boston 
Company, and .$21 92 Irom Kita Packard. 

Longwood avenue— Abate $10 .52 from Peter Cop- 
pinger, and assess John Kilrov $8 81, and upon F. J. 
Ward $7 71. 

South street— Abate $18182 from Michael Rothe. 
and assess Alexander Moseley $123 18 and Simon Co- 
hen $58 34. 



74. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



Gore avenue— Abatf $57 8S from Bosl.oii & Provi- 
dence Railroad Company, and assess the same amount 
upon Samuel A. Way's heirs. 

Orleans street— Abate $190 78 from Nathaniel Ad- 
ams, and assess $i)5 3!) upon Barnebas Hammett, $63 59 
upon Davenport & titickney, trustees, and $31 80 
upon Edward S. Kand. 

Foundry street— Abate $153 22 from Eliza A. Hinck- 
ley and assess the same amount upon l<"rancis Alger 
and John P. Knight. 

ADDITIONAL ACCOMMODATIONS FOU PUBLIC OFFICES. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, tlie report and 
order to hire the Missionary Building in Pemberton 
square, at an annual rent of $7000, for city purposes, 
was taken up and considered. 

A petition was read from the First Baptist Society, 
signed by Erastus 1). Badger, chairman of a. commit- 
tee, proposing to let to Ithe city in their house on 
Somerset street spacious and commodious rooms at a 
rent of .$1500 and taxes, having an exclusive entrance 
thereto, the same having been occupied heretofore as 
a schoolroom. 

Alderman Power moved an indefinite postpone- 
ment of the order. 

Alderman Clark said there appeared to he a differ- 
ence of opinion in the Board as to the necessity of 
going out of the City Hall for office accommodations. 
and it was believed other rooms at a less rate could 
be had. He hoped the order would be laid over an- 
other week, and thai the petition just read would be 
referred to the Committee on Public Buiklnigs. He 
had been assured that the I'ooms in question were 
large, light and airy, a capital place for tlie Board of 
Health or Directors of Public Institutions, and they 
could be had for $1,500 instead of $10,000. 

Alderman Sayward said he had no objection to lay- 
ing over the order, yet he had received a note from 
the parties in charge of the Missionary Biii!ding,wish- 
ing to be released from their offer, unless the build- 
ins was engaged at once. These rooms iniglit lie lo.st liy 
delay, and it might lie very difficult to g( t ^uch rooms 
as may be wanted, if this opportunity slioiild be lost. 
His belief was that it was tho best tiling for the city 
to hire these rooms. It had been sai(l that there 
•were other rooms to be had in Pemberlon square, 
but he had made inquiries, and could find none. He 
had inquired also whether the price for tlie building 
was extravagant, but could not learn tlmt it was so. 
They may lose tlie Iniilding unless the order is soon 
adopted. 

Alderman Power believed they had nothing to risk. 
The rent of the building proposed to lie hired was ex- 
orbitant, and there would be no difficulty in obtaining 
accommodations much more reasonable. It was true 
the building was i)leasantly situated, more so than 
any other, unless on the other corniT; but other 
rooms could be had at a lower rent. Yet they did 
not need accommodations outside of the City 
Hall, .and they could get along for two or three years 
as they hud done, without detriment to the public 
business. There was ample room in the City Hall for 
all parties, and this Board was the proper place to 
decide the question. He cotdd not run round to the 
various offices to see what more accommodations 
they wanted, and they were to decide how it was ad- 
visable to get along and not expend more of the pub- 
lic money than necessary. 

Alderman Sayward replied that the gentleman had 
not visited the building in question to see w'hat its 
accommodations were. He had made inquiries in 
Pemberton sc^uare, and was assured that there was 
no building to rent. He had also inquired of those 
fvbo were good judges, who said the rent asked for 
■was not extravagant, and he believed it would be a 
good investment; by the city, for they needed more 
room. If the object was to save money, they might 
liire cheap rooms, and let tlie rooms in the City Hall. 
He had not gone among officers to inquire whether 
they wanted more room, but knew that all tlie de- 
partments were not accommodated. 

Alderman Emery said he went with the Alderman 
from Ward 10 to look at the building it was proposed 
to hire, and was well satisfied with the rooms. He 
had examined them and believed it would be a good 
trade for any one who wished them. They would 
afford good accommodations for the purposes for 
which they were wanted. He should be reluctant to 
go from the City Hall if accommodations could be 
had here, and if accommodations could be had he had 
nothing to say. More rooms they must have, 
and he knew of none so eligible as those pro- 
posed. There were other rooms to let in Pemberton 
square, less commodious and at a less rent, but if we 
could secure these they will be better suited. He 
had no objection to having the order laid over. 

Alderman Gibson said it was understood the Board 
of Health would not be satisfied to go upon the lower 
Hocr of the Citv Hall, and if so, the measure would 



be defeated in the other branch. There was no alter- 
native, then, but to go out of the building. 

Alderman Emery said he had heard of rooms to 
rent in Montgomery place, at $301)0. but these were 
not to be had and they \vould not be so well adapted 
to the purpose for which they were needed. It was 
possible some of the Aldermen knew something 
about them. . 

Alderman Clark said ho did not believe the Alder- 
men were conversant with such rooms. There would, 
be a meeting of the board on Wednesday or Thurs- 
day, and it may be necessary to go outside of the 
City Hall for rooms. Meantime the Committee on 
Public Buildings can look at the rooms which have 
been offered in'the church on Somerset street, which 
are large and airy. These rooms have been used for 
a young ladies" school, and may be all that are wanted 
for the" Board of Healtli or the Directors of Public 
Institutions. As the price is low, they were worth 
looking at. Rooms must be had, fin- the Board of 
Health could not continue to occupy their present 
quarters without eontraetnig disease. As there were 
no other rooms here which they can have, they must 
be had outside. 'I'he rent of the Missionary Building 
would not be $7000 alone, but $2500 additional for 
fitting the rooms up. 

Alderman Power said the shoe pinches where he 
supposed it would. There were no rooms which suit 
those who are to occupy them. No doubt the Parker 
House would be a much pleasanter place. But the 
Board v\'ere to be the judges of the rooms. There 
were rooms enough in the City Hall, and they were 
to decide who were to maliC use of them. The ex- 
ptnseof the building proposed would be from $25,- 
000 or $30,000.1 or t he alterations would amount to more 
than the rent. There were other rooms in Pemberton 
square, if necessary, to be liad, which would not cost 
more than .$3500 rent, and would give three-quarters 
as much accommodation as the Missionary Building. 
There were no doubt ample rooms in the church if 
they wore needed. 

Alderman Sayward said lie wished to settle this 
questicm, and he would leave it to that gentleman as. 
a committee to assign rooms to all the occupants in 
the City Hall. 

Alderman Power believed there would be little diffi- 
culty ill settling the matter in fifteen minutes. If the 
occupants did not like their rooms, others could be 
found who would accept them, and they would not 
dare dissent from the assignment. 

Aldeimiin Sayward flid not believe there would be 
any dread, for tlie elections were all settled for the 
year, and the AkU^rmen were safe in their places for 
the year. 

The motion to lay the order over was carried, and 
the petitiim of the'Baptist church was referred to the 
committee with the request that they visit the rooms 
in question. 

SALAET BILL. 

The report and orders to fix the salaries of the sev- 
eral city officers for 1873^ (City Doc. 27), was taken 
up. The changes from the previous year, as indi- 
cated by a porticm of the report already published, 
are as follows. 

The allowance for clerk hire in the Teasurer's office 
is increased $]f)00, another clerk being required to 
collect assessments for betterment, etc. 

The allowance for clerk hire in the Auditor's office 
is increased $700. 

The allowance for clerk hire in the City Clerk's 
office is increased .$200. 

The salary of the Assistant Clerk of Committees is 
increased $2",0. 

The salary of the Assistant-Messenger is increased 
$300. 

The salary of the City Surveyor is increased $500. 

The salary of the Superintendent of Health is in- 
creased $300. 

The salary of the City Physician is increased from 
$1,500 to $3000. Fndcr the new organization of the 
Health Department, it appears that the entire time of 
the City Physician will be reqired in the service of 
the city during the ensuing year. 

The allowance for clerk hire in the City Registrar's 
office is increased $1300, the employment of an addi- 
tional clerk having been found necessary. 

The salary of the Superintendent of Streets is in- 
creased $300. 

The salary of tlie Superintendent of Buildings is' in- 
creased $300. 

The salarv of the Chief Truant Officer is increased 
$300. 

The allowance for clerk hire in the Assessor's De- 
partment is increased $1000. 

The total amount of increase recommended is — on 
salaries, $37.50; on clerk hire. $4860. 

The salary of Inspector of Provisions, a new office, 
is fixed at $2000. 



FEBRUARY 



4. 



1873 



75 



'i'he saliiric's under the lii-nt onler were passed with- 
out, coiiiuiciit, until that of the Olei'k of Committees 
was readied, wlieri Alderman Claik moved to increase 
it from p.'iOl) to |;i8l)0. In support of the amen(hnent. 
he stated that the present salary was iinidequate for 
the service performed. He commi'nded tin' Clei'k of 
Committees as one of the most eflicient ofticers in the 
City Hall, whose duties were arduous, and from 
whom the members of the City G«\'ernment and 
those connected with different departments received 
much assistance and information. 

The motion to amend was carried. 

On reading section five of the second order, li.xing 
the salary of the Harbor Master, Alderman Clark in- 
quired the duties of that olticer, and said he had un- 
derstood the office might be abolished. 

Alderman Power replied that the office could not 
be abolished, although it was possible a change could 
be made in relation to it. The Harbor Master must 
be a person familiar with the harbor and with its 
lines, so that in the anchoring of vessels they shall 
not interfere with the commerce of the port:'and it 
was his duty that no interference was made with the 
shipping. It was his duty also to furnish berths for 
vessels, and to see to the' removal of obstructions by 
vessels sunk. He supposed thei Alderman had got 
his impression from statements that the Harbor Po- 
lice might discharge the duties of the office. They 
might if they were good pilots. There was no coni- 
plaint against the present incumbc^iit of the, office, and 
he presumed he does his duty. The office was not so 
important as in New York, 'where the profits were 
$50,000 a year. 

Alderman Clark said the explanation was satisfac- 
tory, for he had understood that the duties of the 
office could be performed by the Harbor Police, and 
that the office was of little consequence. 

Alderman Gibson said it was a duty of the Harbor 
Master to see to keeping the channel open. But 
there were, beI^ides the Harbor Master, the Harbor 
Police, Harbor Committee and the flre boat, and 
most of them liad not much to do. Possibly tliere 
might be some saving by combining the duties of 
these offices. 

On motion of Alderman Clark, the salary of the 
Clerk of the Board of Street Commissioners was in- 
creased from $1.)()0 to $3000. The Alderman bore tes- 
timony to the faithfulness and capacity of the present 
incumbent of the office, and Mr. Jenkins, he observed, 
was richly entitled to the increase. 

On motion of Alderman Sayward — 

Section 3 of the order relating to the salary of the 
Clerk to the Committee on Health was stricken out, 
provision liaviug been made otherwise for the said 
office. 

Alderman Power objected to section four of the same 
order, fixing the salary of the City Pliysician at $3000, 
and hoped it would not pass. 

The ordinance m relation to the new Board of 
Healtli he said he had something to do with framing, 
and it was believed the physician to be appointed as 
a member of the board would act as City Physician, 
for he could do all its duties without any trouble. In 
view of the intentions of the framers of the ordi- 
nance, when the duties of the City Physician wonld be 
lessened, and action had been taken for a general 
vaccination, which was one of the principal and most 
disagreeable duties, with most of the labor taken 
from him, and to double the salary, was out of all 
reason. The proposal would raise the salary to that 
of most of the heads of departments, who devote 
their whole time to the city, and whose responsibili- 
ties amounted to hnndreds of thousands of dollars, 
and lie would labor only just as much as he pleased. 

No one could serve two masters, and he could not 
vote for the increase of salary unless the duties of the 
office were defined. He could not either make such 
a distinction between the salary of this officer and 
that of the physician who was confined to the island. 
The intentions" of the committee were that the mem- 
ber of the board who was a physician should perform 
all the duties of the office, and he did not see why he 
could not. Such, too, were the intentions of " the 
whole City Government in establishing the new Board 
of Health. If the City Physician was to devote his 
whole time to the city, he should not object to the 
salary. 

Alderman Stebbins read from the ordinance defin- 
ing the duties of the office, and stated that in the dis- 
charjfe of duties in ascertaining can.ses of death in 
certain cases, which he was required to do, there 
would be a saving of $600 a year, which was now 
paid out, as he learned from the City Registrar was 
the case last year. 

Alderman Power stated that four physicians had 
been employed in each ward in vaccinating the peo- 
ple, and there wouldlse but little of that to do. He 
woiild make no objection if the City Physician was 
to give his whole time to the city, as the Board of 



Health were expected to do, but there was where the 
trouble comes, that he had a different standing from 
other officers. Before increasing the salary he hoped 
Ihe ordinance would be altered so tliat the City Physi- 
cian should attend to no other business. 

Alderman Stebbins said if the Alderman would 
offer an amendment to that effect he would agree to 
it. He did not know who the City Physician will be 
for another year, and his remarks seemed to reflect 
upon the present City Physician. 

Alderman Power denied that it was any reflection 
upon the present City Physician. 

Alderman Stebbins stated that he happened to 
know that the present City Physician had faithfully 
discharged the duties of his office, more than the pub- 
lic were aware of. His labors were not only during 
the day, but extended far into the night. He had 
given lip his private practice and also the office con- 
nected with the Dispensary, to devote himself en- 
tirely to the interests of the city. 

Alderman Clark did not suppose the office was to 
be abolished by the establishment of the Board of 
Health, nor that the duties were increased by the 
board, an able physician being comprised in it. 
In years past the office had been thought to be desira- 
ble at a salary of $1500 a year, and it would be a little 
singular if the labor should be more arduous with the 
duties diminished. It was a fact that the office had 
been much sought after, yet for an able man to de- 
vote himself entirely to the duties of the office it 
could not be expected that his services could be had 
tor less than $3000. He asked that the section be 
stricken out and laid on the table, that they might be 
better informed as to what was expected of that 
officer. 

The motion was carried — 6 to 5. 

On motion of Alderman Power, the salary of the 
Superintendent of Sewers was increased to $3500. 

On motion of Alderman Sayward, the salary of the 
Superintendent of Streets was increased to .$3800; in 
support of which he said, that while he agreed as to the 
ethcieucy of the Clerk of Committees, the Superin- 
tendent of Streets ought to have as large a salary as 
the Clerk of Committees had. as so large interests 
were committed to his charge. 

On motion of Alderman Sayward, the salary of the 
Superintendent of Public Buildings was increased to 
$381)0. 

Alderman Power moved to increase the salary of 
the Superintendent of Printing to $3000. It was a 
new office, he said, and he had been chairman of the 
Committee on Printing during his whole service in 
the Board, and while he was opposed to raising the 
salary last year, he had found the superintendent to 
be an honest and faithful officer, and through the cre- 
ation of the office a great saving had been effected. It 
was due chiefly to his honesty and integrity that these 
results had been brought about, and his salary should 
he increased. 

Alderman Gaflield said it was designed by the Com- 
mittee on Printing to ask for an increase of the sala- 
ry, and it would have been reported favorably upon, 
but it was too late for the report. He heartily agreed 
with the remarks of the preceding Alderman." 

The amendment was adopted. 

Alderman Power moved to increase the salary of 
the Superintendent of the Federal-street Bridge to 
$1300, the double draw requiring two additional as- 
sistants, and with the increase it would yield him 
only about as much as he had been receiving. 

Alderman Gibson inquired if he fed his own horses. 

Alderman Power replied that he supposed the city 
fed the horses. An additional horse would also b(; 
required. 

The amendment was adopted. 

The section relating to salaries of truant officers 
was stricken out and laid on the table. 

Alderman Gib.son moved to increase the salary of 
the Chief-Engineer of the Fire Department from 
$3500 to $3800," and said he deserved every dollar of 
that amount. 

Alderman Clark advocated the motion as a matter 
of justice to a faithful and efhcient officer. If there 
was an elticient Fire Department in the I'niled States 
it was in the city of Boston, and if there was an offi- 
cer who did his duty faithfully and honestlv, tt was 
the present Chief- Kngineer. 
The amendment was adopted. 

Aldeiman Sayward moved to strike from section four 
of the order relating to thc^ Fire Department, the 
words, "except those located in Ward 10," believing 
the duties of the firemen in that locality to be as 
much and as worthy of full pay as those of other 
sections of the city. 

Alderman GibsJui iii(|iiire(l if they performed as 
much service. 

Alderman Sayward replied tiial they ilid not do as 
much as some firemen did, but they did as much as 
those of East Boston, South Boston and I?oxbury. 



76 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



Alderman Gibson objected to paying as iniicli. if 
not as much service was rendered. ' 

Alderman Sayward replied that as mucli service 
was rendered as by those of the sections mentioned 
by biiu. 

Alderman Power stated that those firemen may not 
be called out so often, but they had more groaud to 
travel over, and as their duties had become more ar- 
duous, they shonid be put on an equal footing with 
others. 

Alderman Gibson said he understood their duties 
were not quite so great last year, when it was pro- 
posed to increase their pai'. 

Alderman Power said it was asked to increase the 
pay last year, but it was not looked upon so favorably 
as now, when their duties had iaicreased, and the 
alarms in that section had been more frequent than 
last year. 

Alderman Gil)son moved a reference of the section 
to the Committee on Fire Uepanment. 

Alderman Sayward did not object to a reference, 
but conlended tliat the lireuien of tliat section 
should be cm an equal footing with those of other 
sections of the city, iheir labors being more than those 
of East Boston. 

Alderman (^uincy was of the belief that for disci- 
pline and lor efficiency of the force, there should be 
no discriminations in regard to pay. They were all 
under the same orders and were liable to be called out 
at any time. 

Alderman Clark did not understand tluit the mem- 
bers of the Fire Department were (ui duty so nmch as 
members of the police in the same ward, and while 
the police performed tlie same amount of duty in all 
sections ol the city, the firemen in that section were 
not called out one-sixtli asnnich as in tlieold sections 
of the city, in which (here was luirdly a night in 
which they were not called out from one to tiiree or 
four times. The pay might be loo nuich in some 
sections, but the cases of the firemen and police were 
dillerent. 

Alderman Power did aiot believe the ditferenee in 
labor was as much as the dilference in pay. The pay 
was not half .-is much us it ought to be, and he believ- 
ed it to be better to have the pay equal. There was a 
difference in the service of ibe police, who had the 
same pay, between a beat on JMorth street and one in 
Ward 16. 

Alderman Clark believed no firemen haa a cleaner 
record than had those of this city, but he failed to see 
so much service performed by those of Ward Iti, 
and he thought the remarks of the Alderman were a 
reflection upon the services of firemen. 

Alderman Power said he designed no reflection in 
his remarks. The pay of firemen was about $300 a 
year, while tliat of policemen was $3 a day. If there 
was no alarm there was no diseouiu on the pay, and 
the firemen should be so paid, that when their duties 
were extraordinary, they would not expect to have 
any additional pay. There was no belter Fire De- 
partment than in Boston, and the firemen of Ward 16 
let themselves to go when they were called. They 
were ready and willing to go when they were called 
upon, and found no fiinlt in being called out. 

Alderman Sayward s.aid the Alderman from Ward 4 
had stated the question fairly, that there should be 
no difference in the pay of firemen, wlio were all lia- 
ble to be called upon at all times, and were ready and 
willing to discharge their duties. If it was not 
enough, he wonld agree to \'ote for more. It was 
true tuat some of the firemen had more duty to per- 
form than others, but justice required that after work- 
ing for three years for less pay, the pay of these fire- 
men should be the same as the rest of" the firemen of 
the city. 

Alderman Gibson believed in doing justice to all 
parts of the city, and that there should ' be no goug- 
ing. Those who do double the duty of others should 
have more pay. and there was no reason why they 
should pay all alike. They should meet the question 
squarely, and talk to the mark, and those who do 
double duty should have double pay. 

Alderman Sayward was willing to meet the ques- 
tion squarely, and as the firemeii of East Boston do 
not half the duty that the firemen of No, 4 do, they 
should not have so much pay. 

Alderman Quincy again olsjected to discrimination 
in the way of discipline, and illustrated it by army 
life, for while one regiment may be assigned to 
charge of trains in the rear and have an easier time, 
they may at another time be called to the front. So 
it would happen in the cases of the firemen, that, at 
times, some of them would have easier duties than 
others. 

Alderman Gaftield referred to the circumstances 
under which the reduced pay of firemen of Ward 16 
was established. Immediately before annexation the 
inhabitants of the town voted to purchase six steam 
engines, as many as were in the old portion of Boa- 



ton; and as so many were not needed, it was agreed 
that if ail were retained in service the firemen were 
to serve at less pay. 

Alderman Sayward replied that it was true they 
had six engines, but there were no more than there 
were when Dorchester was a town. 

The motion to refer to the Committee on the Fire 
Department was carried, and section five,rolating to the 
salaries of assistant foremen, etc., with a similar ex- 
ception aliplyiug to Ward 16, was also referred to the 
same committee. 

Alderman Sayard moved to strike out section seven, 
fixing the salaries of members of companies in Ward 
16, and this also was referred to Committee on Fire 
Department, 

Some discussion occurred upon the pay of the men 
of the fire boat. Alderman Power inquiring why any 
of them should have more pay than the firemen, or 
those of the same class, on shore, wiiile those on the 
boat were furnished also with their board. 

Alderman Gibson seated that these men were re- 
quired to be on the lioat all the time, and they would 
prefer paying their own board if they could go home. 

Alderman Stebliins said the pay was the same as 
was paid on the tug boats. 

Alderman Brown moved to increase the pay of Fir.st 
Assistant-Assessors from $T to $8 per day. 

Alderman Clark opposed the amendment, believing 
that $7 a day was good pay for the time employed. 

Alderman Brown believed the pay to be small for 
the value of the services performed, and stated in re- 
ply to questions that it was expected they would be 
employed eight hours a day, and that was the amount 
of time which he gave to the city in his office. The 
increase for 4.5 days" service would give an aggregate 
of but $1200. which was extremely small. 

Alderman Clark said he had supposed that not 
more than four or five hours were devoted to 
the duties, and he did not believe that many of them 
were as faithful as was the alderman while acting as 
Assessor- 
It was further objected to increasing the pay while 
there were so many anxious to be elected to the olfice, 
and Alderman <4il)soii expressed the belief that the 
services of the Second Assistant-Assessors might be 
dispensed with after getting through with the out-of- 
door work. 

Alderman Power urged as an objection against in- 
crease of pay, that most of the Assistant-Assessors 
attended to oilier business. 

The motion tn amend was lost. 

The several orders having been passed. Alderman 
Clark moved a reconsideration of the salary of the 
Superintendent of the Public Library, with a view to 
its increase. 

Aldermen Gaflleld and Quincy favored the recon- 
sideration, in remarks upon the efficiency of the Su- 
perintendent, whose services would command gueater 
pay elsewhere. 

The reconsideration was carried, and the salary 
was increased to $3,500. 

Aldfu-man Sayward moved a reconsideration of the 
section establishing the salaiy of the Superintendent 
of Health, with a view to an increase. 

Aldermen Gibson and Hulbert opposed any in- 
crease, believing that the duties could not be in- 
creased by the establishment of the new Board of 
Health. 

Alderman Sayward said the duties had not been 
lessened. 

Alderman Gibson further objected, that if each 
Alderman increased the salaries of the department 
under him. he should be obliged to ask for a similar 
increase of those with which he was connected, other- 
wise he would be found fault with. 

Alderman Slebbins stated that the committee had 
reported an increase of this salary of $300. 

Alderman (Jaflield proposed a compromise to in- 
crease the salary $-200, instead of $500, as at first de- 
signed by the m'over, which would make it $3,500, an 
increase of the same amount with other departments. 

The amendment as proposed was carried, and the 
salary was fixed at $3,500. 

The several orders were passed, together with a 
concluding one that the Auditor and Treasurer be di- 
rected to pay to the several officers of Suffolk County 
the amounts prescribed by law to lie paid by the 
county of Suffolk. 

rAPBKS FROM THE COMMON rOUNfll,. 

The petitions of P. Campbell & Son, E. C. Drew 
and a conimunication from the Board of Engineers 
of the Fire Department, were severally referred, in 
concurrence. 

The report ileave to withdraw) on petition of Pear- 
son Brothers &- Co. and others, fo* the location of ad- 
ditional fire appara.tiis in Norfolk avenue, was ac- 
cepted. 

The report referring to the Committee on Legisla- 



FEBRUARY 34^ 



1873 



77 



five Affairs the subject of placiug the contnil ol' stii- 
bles in tlie hantts of tlic Koarrl of Health, ranie up for 
{'oncurrenee. 

Aldevnian Saywai'd said this matter linrt beiui be 
fore the Board in one form once, yet if tbe Hoard saw- 
lit, to, they would pass it. 

On motion of Alderman Gibson the order was laid 
on the table. 

The reference to the t'onnuittee on the City Kn 
gineer\s Department of an order for an inspection 
and survey of tlie arch entrances to the towers of 
the Boston & Lowell Railroad Station on Causeway 
street, being on concurrence. 

Alderman Bigelow moved the reference to tlie Com- 
mittee on Survey and Inspection of Buildings, as 
more appropriate, in which case, the services of the 
Engiiieer might be called, if necessary. 

This motion was debated on the question of appro- 
priateness, an ob,iection being made that a delay 
would be caused by sending the matter back to the 
other branch, and if the building in ciuestion needed 
an examination it should be done at once. 

The motion was withdiawn, when the Board non 
concurred in the reference, and the order was passed 
requesting the City Engineer to make the inspection 
and survey proposed. 

FIRST-ASSISTANT-ASSESSOH. 

The election of Artemas B. Holden as a First- 
Assistant-Assessor, in place of James Dennie, chosen 
by this Board, came up, when the Board proceeded to 
an election, resulting as follows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Jauies Dennie 10 

Artemas R. Holden 2 

Mr. Dennie was again declared to be elected, in non- 
concurrrence. 

The following orders were severally passed, in con- 
currence: 

Order that the Superintendent of Health be author- 
ized to employ a principal clerk and such assistants 
as the Committee on Health may deem necessary for 
his department. 

Report and order authorizing a loan of $10,000 in 
addition to the amount appropriated for engine 
house, Ward 14. 

Order for a release to the Boston & Albany Rail- 
road of all claims for damages on account of raising 
certain estates on Washington and Orange streets, 
on payment to city of $8000 therefor. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Sayward. from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of licenses as follows: 

Post 26, G. A. R., to give dramatic entertainments 
at Institute "Hall, February 24 and 3T: B. F. O'Don- 
nell, to give a musical entertainment at Sumner Hall, 
February 2.5; also to twenty-five newsboys and three 
bootblacks: to Aaron D. Capen and William H. Mer- 
riam, as auctioneers, and to sundry per.sons for bil- 
liard saloons, wagon licenses and dealers In second- 
hand articles. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Sayward, from the Committee on Health, 
reported in favor of stables as follows: P. S. Morton, 
to occupy a wooden stable for four additional horses 
on First" street, between I and K streets: Allen & 
Guthrie, to occupy a wooden stabls for two horses at 
ISti Border street: Charles Shuler, to occupy a wooden 
stable for one horse at 472 Saratoga street: and leave 
to withdraw on petition of M. T. Downing, for leave 
to erect additional stalls in stable on Fourth street, 
South Boston. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Sayward. from the .same committee, re-' 
ported leave to withdraw on petition of Jane Louge 
for compensation as a nurse; also on petition of 
E. E. Hill to be compensated for supplies furnished 
and property destroyed, on account of his house. No. 
tit) Hudson street, being used as a smallpox hospital. 
Severally accepted. 

Alderman Stebbins, from the Committee on Water, 
to whom was referred as unfinished business of last 
year, the order in relation to establishing a drinking 
fountain on the corner of Cabot and Treinont streets, 
made a report recommending that the order he re- 
ferred to the Cochituate Water Board. 

Accepted. 

Alderman Cutter, from the Committee on Fire De- 
partment, to whom was referred the remonstrance of 
Samuel S. Perkins and others of ITpton street against 
the location of Hose Company No. !i on said street, 
nrade a report that the committee was unanimous in 
the opinion that the hose company should be located 
further south if removed from its prrseut site, and 
that no action is necessary. .Accepted. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On ni«ti(ni of Ald(*man Quincy— 

Ordered, That there be paid to the following-named 
persons the sums hereinafter set against their re- 
spective names, being the amounts of the verdicts, 



interest and costs recovered by them respectively for 
land taken and damages sustained by them by the 
widening of Washington avenue, in the city of Chel- 
sea, by an order of the County Commissioners of 
Middlesex County, passed (Ui the first Tuesday, 1872, 
upon their giving due acquittance and receipt there- 
for, vi/,.: James Blaisdell, ifillS .57; Silas R. Curry, 
.t(il3 74; Thomas H. Greeley, $784 04; Hamlett Bates, 
.f2121 88; Sarah II. Loomis, wife of Jason B. Loomis, 
$1,517 45; Jo.seph W. Cookson, $61:^ 70; Oliver S. Ca- 
lef, .f lOOfi 48; Mary Jane Bosson, wife! of George. C. 
Bosson, $1050 10; ' Nancy Thwaites, wifeof William 
G Th\\'aitcs, $400 37. 

Ordered, That so much of the order passed by this 
hoard on the 22d January last as authorized the pay- 
ment of any money to either of said persons, be and 
the same is hereby rescinded. 

Alderman Quincy explained with reference -to the 
above, thai when the order was passed a few weeks 
since, in relation to the widening of Washington av- 
enue, in Chelsea, it was believed by him that the pay- 
ments made under the order included the full amount, 
but it appeared that sonn' of the parties had appealed 
from the award of damages, and the amounts named 
had been recovered through the courts. 

On moticm of Alderman Clark — 

Ordered, That the following bills for extra services 
performed by police officers be allowed for payment 
by the Auditor of Accounts, provided they are ap- 
proved in the usual manner, viz.: 

S. B. Hueston, $19; Clark T. Tripp. $12; Luther C. 
Bailey, Patrick Coakley, Gilman F. Decatur, Jacob 
Karciier, Isaiah S. Robinson, $9 each; Michael Crosby, 
Stephen J). Gardner, William H. Hubbard, Roswell 
M. Lyon, John F. Metzger, Martin R. Shay, Joseph 
W. Weeks. Eben T. Hitchcock, $0 each;" Andrew 
Lyman, James H. Baxter, Samuel \V. Marsh, Joseph 
Parker, $--i each. 

A question was raised whether the sums above- 
named were proper payments, it being supposed that 
the police were only iii the proper discharge of their 
duties, but these charges, it was said, were for extra 
duties after the regular service of the day was per- 
formed, some of them in attendance upon the small- 
pox hospitals. 

WIDENING OF PEDBEAX STREET, 

.\lderman Clark presented a petition from George 
C. Richardson, Charles W. Freeland and many oth- 
ers, setting forth as their belief that the northerly 
portion of Federal street, near Milk street, should be 
wideneci on the easterly side, and that to make tte 
widening as contemplated, on the westerly side, would 
be a grave error. They therefore ask thiit a hearing 
be granted them on the subject before the Board. 

Alderman Clark stated that the Street Commission- 
ers were nearly ready to report upon the widening of 
Congress, Federal street and Oliver street extended, 
and nearly aTl the other streets, including all of Con- 
gress street except from Water street to State street. 
He did not see how they could refuse to hear the pe- 
titioners, and he moved that a hearing be granted 
to them on Wednesday at one o'clock. 

It was voted to give" a hearing at the time desig- 
nated. 

Alderman Sayward offered the following order: 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Public Build- 
ings be authorized to prepare photographs and plans 
of several schoolhoiises at an expense nol exceeding 
the sum of $.500, and to loan the same to tbe State 
Commissioner on Education for the Vienna Exposi- 
tion: the expense therefor to be charged to the Ap- 
propriation for Schoolhcuises, Public Buildings. 

Aldermen Power and Gibson opposed the order as 
a needless expense, and not justifiable, and it was ad- 
vocated by Aldermen Sayward, Clark and Gaffield, 
who believed there might be soini' utility in if. while 
the pictures and plans would be loaned only, and not 
a gift as was asserted. Alderman Sayward did not 
suppose the expense would exceed $3"00, 

The order was rejected, and Alderman Clark moved 
a reconsideration, (ui which tbe yeas and nays were 
ordered. 

The reconsideration was lost, by a vote of 5 to 7, as 
follows: 

Yeas— Clark, Emery, (Jultield, Quincy, Sayward. 

Nays—Bigelow. Brown, Cutter, Gibson,' Hnlbert, 
Power, Stebbins. 

M KTUOPOLITAN RAILROAD STAlil.E. 

On motion of Alderman Sayward, the order to lo- 
cate I lie in-oposed stable for the Metroiiolitan Rail- 
road on Bartlett street and Shuwmnt avenue, -'at 
least one hundred feel, from any public streel or 
way," was taken from the table aiid considered. 

Ahhu'inaii Power opijosed tlu^ order on account of 
its effect in preventing the extension of St. James 
street, and he hojied it would not be passed until the 
question of extending Ihat streef was di-cidcd upon. 

Alderman Sayward s;iid there was no reason for 
the delay, and it was due lo Ihe Metropolitan Rail- 



78 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



road Company that tlicy shniild lie allowoil to liuild 
llieir stalilc at once. 

Alderman Hulbci't said lie had uiviai some attention 
to the matter, as one of interest to his si'ction of thv 
city, and it was his opinion tliat the building of the sta- 
ble should be allowed. The opening- of a new street the 
railroad company did not object to, and were willinfj; 
that one should be opened wliich would lietter answer 
the purpose designed, in getting access to the Public 
Library. One of the principal movers in the matter 
originally did not object to the passage of the order 
as afiectlng the question of the street opening. 

The order was passed. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

Ou petition oi' J. J. Birkmaier & Co., tor leave to 
place a steam engine and boiler in building formerly 
No. 11 South street. Hearing Monday, 10th March, 4 
.P.M. 



<Jn i)etition of Benjamin Randall, for leave to place 
a steam (nigine and boiler on lot i:^, on Chelsea street. 
Hearing Monday, 10th March, 4 P. M. 

OBDEBS BEAD ONCE. 

On motion of Alder]nau Clark, orders to pay, heirs 
of Joshua Bennett .-{iliMO. for land taken to widen 
Bedford strei't: to pay heirs of Charles O.Rogers 
$4040, for land taken to widen Devonshire street;^ to 
pay -James M. Beebe $8080, for land taken to widen 
Devonshire street: to pay .Tane Montgomery .|8980, 
for laud taken in the name of heirs of Thomas Mont- 
gomery for the widening of Summer street; to pay 
John L. Bird $6r)3 70, for land taken to widen Cot- 
tage; to pay Metropolitan Railroad Company $1380 45, 
for land taken to widen Stougllton street, anij 
,f249ti 44. for land taken to widen Pjnchon street. 

Adjourned to Wednesday, one o'clock. - 



79 



BOARD OF ALDii^RMEN 



OITY OF BOSTON. 



Pi'oceediii^s of the Board of AMeviiuMi, 

FEBRUARY QG, 1873. 



An adjourned meeting of the Board of Aldermen 
was held this afternoon at one o'clock, for the pur- 
pose of hearing certain petitioners in relation to the 
widening of Federal street— Alderman Cutter, the 
Chairman, presiding. 

Alderman Stebbins suggested that as there had 
been no report from the Street Commissioners as to 
what they intf^nded to do, it would be desirable to 
have a report from them as to their plans in the 
premises. 

Mr. Smith, chairman of the Board of Street Com- 
missioners, stated that the Committee on Streets 
were familiar with their plans, and could give the 
desired information. 

Alderman Clark stated that it was the design of the 
commissioners to make the proposed widening, part- 
ly on one side and partly on the other, while the peti- 
tioners wis he 1 the widenin;- lobe entirely on the east- 
erly side. 'I'he Board wouul be ready to put in their 
report tomorrow, and it was desirable that it should 
be acted upon at that time so that it might go for ac- 
tion to the Common Council on Thursday evening. 

It was believed to be desirable to have this hear- 
ing to save complaint and the comments of the press, 
but neither the commissioners or the City Council 
had been the cause of delay in widening the streets. 
It had not been the commissioners, but individuals 
who had asked for changes and for continuous hear- 
ing, which had caused the delay. 

i). E. Ware appeared for petitioners and stated 
that they believed piiblic consideration required the 
widening to be on the easterly side of the street, at 
the outlet of which it was abrupt and difficult for the 
travel which passes through those streets. To show 
that, he would call several witnesses. 

George C. Richardson said the views expressed by 
Mr. Ware were those entertained with him. He had 
been engaged in business for many years on Federal 
street, and there had been a constant difficulty in the 
blocking of the street at the corner of Milk street. 
When the Cunningham estate was cut off on the cor- 
ner, individual owners of property contributed to the 
slight widening. When the plans were first pro- 
posed, it was contemplated widening the street on 
the easterly side, and that it was understood would 
be the widening until after the 1st January. When 
the proposed change of widening to sixty feet and on 
both sides was determined upon, the petitioners were 
not notified, and that was the .aason of their coming 
here. 

Federal street must continue to be a great thor- 
oughfare, and to widen on the westerly side would 
be to bring the travel against the new post office. If 
either street was to be widened, he believed it should 
be Federal street, yet with the widening of several 
of the streets in this vieinity, there was not a great 
width required in widening. 

George O. Hovey said lie had no interest in the 
matter except as a taxpayer, but he had often been 
subject to blocks at the corner of Federal, Milk and 
Congress streets. If one of the streets was to be fifty 
and the other sixty, the sixty should be Federal street. 
The block where he mentioned was one of the worst 
that he knew of, and the street should be widened on 
the easterly side to bring the street more nearly to 
Congress street. 

To Alderman Clark he said he was not aware that 
Milk street was to be widened to sixty feet. Yet 
that would not.be enough to prevent the difficulty in 
the way of blocking. 

To Mr. Ware — There ought to be fifty per cent, 
more width at the corner of the Streets mentioned 
than at other points, and if the widening was to be 
sixty feet, at the corner or junction of the streets, it 
should be ninety feet, and he would prefer to have it 
one hundred feet. The extension of Franklin street 
he did not think would relieve this blocking much. 
He was in favor of wide streets. Federal street 
should be sixty and Congress street fifty feet. 

Charles W. Freeland said he had testified before 
the Street Commissioners that the widening should 
be done on the easterly side. He had been in fa- 
vor of rounding off the corner of Milk and Congress 
streets, (which Mr. W^are said the Government would 
objeet to as a portion of the post-office purchase). 
In view of this statement he believed there should be 
a rounding off on the corne.i of Federal and Milk 
streets at the lower corner. The appearance of the 



plan exhibited to him he thought would take off 
more than was necessary. 

In relation to the widening of other streets, he said 
if it was understood that Uevonshsre street, from 
Milk to Franklin street, was to remain at its present 
width of forty eight feet, he did not see why fifty feet 
WHS not wide enough for all the streets running iu 
the same direction below that street. The streets 
being near together, there was not much need for 
wideiiing. It would be more natural to widen Fed- 
eral street than any other, from its natural outlet. 

Charles H. Parker (A. & A. Lawrence & Co.) con- 
curred in the statements in relation to blockades at 
the corner of Congress, Milk and Federal streets. 
The standing of teams in the vicinity had been dif^- 
continued to cause the removal of the difficulty, but 
it did not remedy the evil, and the only remedy he 
could see w as to cut off on the lower corner of Fed- 
eral street. The travel on Federal street was north- 
wardly towards the water, the outlet being from Fed- 
oral to Congress street. It was not so much conse- 
quence which side the street was widened provided 
the lower corner should be widened to eighty or 
ninety feet. In the property in which he was inter- 
estecl, he was willing to pay reasonable betterments 
to secure the improvement heeded. 

R. L. Holt (Holt & Steadman), as a truckman for 
many years, had known no other place in the city for 
blocking so bad as the corner of Milk, Congress and 
Federal streets, and frequently had lost trains in 
going to the railroad depots on account of the block- 
ing of the street. By taking off the east side, wit.la 
the widening of Milk street, a great relief would be 
afforded. There was a great deal of suffering in going 
to the northerly depots. He was not aware until to- 
day of the proposed widening of Milk street to sixty 
feet, which would give great relief. He was afraid 
that the widening of Milk street would not give the 
relief required. 

Richard Bradford, truckman, gave similar testimo- 
ny in relation to the blocking at the corner of Milk, 
Federal and Congress streets. The widening of Milk 
street would not alone give all the relief needed, and 
the widening of Federal street should be on the east- 
erly side on account of the grade, and to bring t*ie 
street more nearly in junction with Congress street. 
Alouzo Hamilton, for many years located in Federel 
street and vicinity, had long been familiar with the 
blocking at the corners specified, and on hearing of 
the proposed widening on the westerly side, he was 
astonished, believing the convenience of the public 
should require bringing Federal nearer to Congress 
street. The widening of Milk street would by no 
means remedy the difficulty, which was to get rid of 
right angles of the streets. 

William Endicott, Jr., (Hovey & Co.,) was of opin- 
ion that the widening should be on the easterly side, 
to bring Federal street nearer to Congress street, the 
natural continuation of the street. Federal street 
should turn into Congress street with as little inter- 
ruption as possible. 

To Alderman Clark— Even though it cost from 
$150,000 to .f200,000 more to widen on the easterly 
side, it was desirable to make the widening when it 
can be done, so that it shall meet the wants of the 
public for twenty years to come. 

Henry Adams, formerly in business in the vicinity, 
concurred in the statements in relation to the block- 
ing at the corners mentioned. He would have Fed- 
eral street sixty feet in width from Channing to Milk 
street, deflecting towards Congress street.' There 
was now a prospect of making Federal street one of 
the best avenues in the city and it should be done 
for all time, as easily right as wrong. It would not 
do to have Federal street come against the Post 
Office, but as far as possible Federal street and Con- 
gress street should be one avenue, much more travel 
passing from Congress to Federal than in the contin- 
uance of Congress street. 

L. J. Bradish agreed witli the other witnesses gen- 
erally in regard to the proposed widening. 

George S. Winslow concurred also in the views ex- 
pressed by others. 

Mr, Herschell, engineer, in the proposed widening 
believed Federal and Congress streets should be 
brought as near together as possible, but the difficulty 
was greater in the grade, inasmuch as few teams 
would be likely to turn up Milk street from Federal 
street. In the octagonal plan the proposed widening 
at the comer would take 2000 feet, and the rounding 
off about 1900 feet. 

F. L, Key, teamster, found the same difficulty in 
blocks, and agreed with others as to the means of re- 
lieving the blocks by widening on the easterly side. 
Michael F. Lynch, newsman, believed the widening 
should be on the easterly side of the street. Mr. 
Lynch proceeded, in a speech of much earnestness, 
to protest against the proposed action of the Street 
Commissioners, when Alderman Clark objected, and 



FEBRUARY 26, 1873 



80 



Mr. Lynch clowd by isaying if he could not be heard 
hore he would be al the polls. 

Mr. Ware !<aid he would close here, it having been 
hoped that Mr. Burt, the postmaster, would be ncard, 
but he was absent at Washington. 

Robert K. Pottei-, as a remonstrant, objected to the 
l))an of i)etitioners. The subject had been thorough- 
ly considered in three exhaustive hearings, in which 
lie gave his views fully. He had long been familiar 
with the corner where the blocks occurred, and he did 
not believe they were any greater than ni many other 
l)laces. He believed fifty feet was wide enough for 
Federal street, with the widening of many other 
streets in the vicinity. If Congress street was to he 
a continuation of Federal street, let it be continued 
through to Chauncy street or beyond, and it would 
not wipe out more property than it woiild under fhe 
l)l!ln of petitioners. 

Mr. Potter called upon the Street Commissioners 
to give their reasons for the proposed action by^ them. 
Mr. Smith, chairman of the Street Commissioners, 
stated the various plans which came before the 
Board, and the reasons given in favor of those plans, 
in relation to which the friends of the measures used 
the most urgent means to carry out their plans. 
Admitting, he said, that there had been a 
great cause of complaint in the blocking 
at the point specified, the widening of Milk street 
and the extension of Franklin street would give 
great relief. Atlantic avenue would also take a great 
amount of travel which has hitherto gone over these 
blocked streets. The commissioners were at one 
time in favor of fifty feet for Federal street, but on 
account of the great pressure, a delay was occasioned, 
and now if no changes are required they would he 
prepared to lay these plans before the City Council 
within forty-eight hours. 

The delay occasioned in ^.iving lines was not on 
account of the Street Commissioners, as had been at- 
tributed, and when their plans were matured, they 
generally obtained the approval of the Committee on 
Streets, "to prevent delay in the City Council. No 
matter which side of the street the widening should 
be made on, there would be the same objection, and 
the opposition now made to the plans of ihe commis- 
sioners were almost entirely by theparties interested. 
To Alderman. Stebbins he said the widening as 
proposed, partly on both sides, was for the purpose 
of straiglitening the street as far as possiRle. 

Alderman Hulbert wished to correct the commis- 
sioner by saying the Committee on Streets were not 
entirely unanimous in favor of widening Federal 
street to sixty feet. 

Mr. Smith said to Mr. Ware that one cause of the 
blocking at the corners specified was that Milk street 
was narrower at Federal street than above or below, 
but that difficulty would be remedied in the widen- 
ing of Milk street. He did not believe there would 
be so much obstruction to travel at the corner by 
turning at an angle as there would be in crossing di- 
agonally from Federal to Congress street. 

Mr. Talbot, commissioner, agreed with Mr. Smith 
as to the relief which would be afforded by the wid- 
ening of Milk street, and this would he aided by the 
exteinsion of Pearl street. The expense of street 
widenings it was hoped would come within $3,000,000, 
yet with the widenings to be presented tomorrow, the 



cost to the present time would amount to $2,700,000. 
He was satisfied with the action of the commissioners, 
and was willing to rest their reputations upon it in 
the future. 

General Burrell, Commissioner, agreed with the 
other Commissioners in relation to the action of the 
Board. 

Mr. Richardson was called in relation to some state- 
ments made, and stated that the project of the addi- 
tional widening of ten feet was not a matter in hear- 
ing, the chairman having repeatedly stated that while 
there were two lines on the plans, it was not expect- 
ed that the widening would be more than fifty feet in 
width. 

Mr. Smith replied that it was true he did not believe 
more than fifty feet in width would be required, but 
in that the Commissioners were overruled by the 
public, but the lines were each on the plans, and in 
relation to these lines, Mr. Talbot concurred with 
him that both of the lines were matters of hearing 
while Mr. Richardson was present. 

Mr. Ware concluded the hearing in remarks upon 
the testimony of the petitioners, in which he urged 
rhat the petitioners were not heard in relation to the 
proposed widening, and as the action of the Com- 
missioners was not conclusive he entreated the 
Board to take such measures as may he necessary in 
providing convenient, suitable, proper streets for the 
transaction of business. The loss of minutes was a 
loss of time, a waste of wealth, and it should be the 
object in street improvements to prevent delay in 
travel, by making streets as far as possible contin- 
uous lines of travel. 

Mr. W'are referred to the various plans which had 
been considered, some of which were to make con- 
tinuous streets to State street, and this had reference 
to direct travel, without obstruction ; and while the 
programme had been carried out to a great extent, it 
had been departed from in this most impartant thor- 
oughfare, much to the surprise of the petitioners. 

It could be carried out with but little sacrifice, of 1500 
to 2000 feet of land, which would secure continuous 
travel from Federal to Congress street. There had 
been six conflicting lines of travel at the point of 
blockade, but, as proposed by petitioners, these lines 
would be reduced to four. Every argument in favor 
of the extension of any streets was equally favor- 
able to a continuance of Federal street to make the 
travel easy to Congress street. 

Upon the conclusion of the remarks of Mr. Ware, 
the question was raised as to what should be the dis- 
position of the petition. 

A motion to lay the petition on the table was ob- 
.jected to by Alderman Power, who thought it should 
be referred to the Committee on Streets. 

Alderman Clark said there would have been no 
hearing if the matter had been for the committee to 
act upon. 

The Chair stated that the petitioners had obtained 
their object in a hearing, when the petition was laid 
on the table. 

An order was read once to change certain assess- 
ments for sewers. 

On motion of Alderman Gibson, the Board ad- 
journed to Thursday, twelve o'clock. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



81 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ProcoediTig's of the IJoard of AlderiiHMi, 

FEBRUARY Ml, 1873. 



An adjourned meeting of the Board of Aldermen 
was hold at noon, today, Alderman Cutter, the chair- 
man, presiding. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Mr. N. Hubbard, for leave to occupy a wooden sta- 
ble for one horse rear of 24 Sherman street. Referred 
to Committee on Health. 

-Tolin II. Kelly and others, that Daniel Crockett be 
confirmed as foreman of Hook and Ladder Company 
No. 4. Referred to Committee on Fire Department. 

Leander H. Jones and others, that a street in con- 
tinuation of Foundry street be called Alfred street. 
Referred to Connnittee on Paving. 

Patrick t'ampbell, to be paid for damages caused 
to his sleigh upon Broadway Bridge. Referred to 
Committee on Claims. 

Nehemiah Berry, for leave to furnish water to East 
Boston from Flax Pond, in Lynn. Referred to Co- 
chituate Water Board. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were severally read a second 
time and passed: 

Order to ])ay John L. Bird %iS^i?, 70, for land taken 
to widen Cottage street. 

Order to pay Jane Montgomery $8980, for land 
taken in the name of heirs of Thonias Montgomery, 
for the widening of Summer street. 

Order to pay James M.. Beebe $8080, for land taken 
for the widening of Devonshire street. 

Order to pay heirs of Joshua Bennett .$1940, for 
land taken for the widening of Bedford street. 

Order to pay heirs of Chlirles O. Rogers $4040, for 
land taken to widen Devtmshire street. 

Order to pay Elizabeth and Ann M. Moore $.500, for 
land taken and damages in the widening of Emerson 
street. 

Order to pay Metropolitan Railroad Company 
$138045, for land taken for the widening of Stoughton 
street. 

Order to pay Metropolitan Railroad Company for 
land taken towiden Pynchon street. 

Order for the change of certain sewer assessments 
on Vinton, Laurel, Ottawa, Hammond, Beacon. Tren- 
ton, Bellevue and Warren streets. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Power, from the Committee on Steam 
Engines, reported in favor of the petition of Bartlett 
& Richardson to locate a steam boiler at 389 Broad- 
way. Accepted. 

Alderman Say ward, from the Committee on Health, 
reported in favor of stables as follows: George S. 
Howe, to occupy a wooden stable for sixteen horses 
on Hunnema* street; Richard Woodsome, to occupy 
his stable for seven more horses rear of (i54 Sixth 
street; Joseph D. Crowell, to occupy a wooden stable 
for three horses on Eastern Packet pier. Severally 
accepted. 

The same committee reported leave to withdraw on 
petition of Henry Spilken, for leave to occupy a 
wooden stable for one horse on marsh near Ward 
street. Accepted. 

Alderman Cutter, from the Committee on Claims, 
reported leave to withdraw on petition of Holohan & 
Maguire, to be paid for plumbing work performed on 
the smallpox hospital on Sweft street, which was 
destroyed by fire. 

On motion of Alderman Sayward, the report was 
laid on the table. 

Alderman Cutter, from the same committee, re- 
ported leave to withdraw on petition of Smith & Mc- 
Garagle to be paid the full amount mentioned in their 
contract with the city for the erection of the small- 
pox hospital on Swett street, which was destroyed by 
fire. 

Laid on the table. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman Qnincy— 

Ordered, That the armory of Company A, Ninth 
Regiment of Infantry M. V. M., in the hall on the 
corner of Causeway and Leverett streets, be and the 
same is hereby approved as a suitable place for the 
deposit and safe keeping of arms and equipments. 



STREET WIDENINGS. • 

The following communication was received from 
the Street Commissioners, covering orders for widen- 
ing several streets, as specified : 

The resolves and orders adoi)ted by the Board of 
Street Commissioners, today, anrl sent to your hon- 
orable body for concurrence, are for the widening of 
Milk street, between Washington and Batterymarch 
streets, to fifty feet, in all biit that portion between 
Devonshire and Congress, where the width is increas- 
ed to sixty feet; the widening and extension of 
Franklin street, from Devonshire across Federal and 
Congress streets to Pearl street, at Stnrgis street, as 
a forty foot street, and making a continuous avenue 
from Washington street to Atlantic avenue in a direct 
line, and by an easy grade; the widening of Federal 
street to sixty feet, by takings upon both sides of the 
street to produce a perfectly straight street from 
High to Milk street; the widening of Congress street 
by takings upon both sides to sixty feet until the 
vicinity of Milk street is reached, when the new line 
is carried cm the easterly side above, increasing to a 
width of seventy feet opposite the proposed Post 
Office site to Water street — the intention being to 
complete the widening of the street thence to State 
street when the surveys shajl be completed; the fifty 
feet wide extension of Pearl street, from Milk street 
to Water street, at Congress street, about eighty feet 
north of the corner of Milk and Congress streets, 
leaving an open space or square soine ItiO feet in 
width from the westerly side of Pearl street; and the 
extension of Oliver street from Milk street to Liberty 
square at fifty feet width. 

The interdependence of these streets has led the 
C'ommissioners to treat these several widenings and 
extensions as parts of one whole improvement, as in 
their judgment this course will result in less expense 
to the city in the payment of damages, and greater 
benefit in the future assessments for betterments. 

The Commissioners beg leave to represent to the 
Honorable Council thattjie labor uiion the necessary 
surveys of these streets, after the lines had been de- 
cided on, was tlie principal cause of the delay attend- 
ing the presentation of the accompanying orders. 
They were, however, happy to say that the surveyors" 
work upon the remaining portion of the streets in 
this part of the city in which changes are contemplat- 
ed is in such a state of forwardness as to insure its 
completion within a few days. 

WIDENING OF CHAUNCY STREET. 

Resolve and order for the widening of t'hauucy 
street, at the corner of Summer street, at a cost of 
$43,520, by taking land, as follows: 

Osborn Howes and Richard J. Monks, trustees, 1384 
feet, $:30, $41, .520; damages $1000— $42,.520. 

Alderman t!lark stated that this measure had been 
before the Committee on Streets, and they were in 
favor of its approval. 

Passed iii concurrence. 

WIDENING OF FEDERAI., STREET. - 

Resolve and order for the widening of Federal 
street, by taking land of the several persons therein 
named, at an exi)ense of $:i41,869. 
The several items of cost are as follows: 
Georj^e Lawton. corner of Broad street. 602 feet. 
$18, land total costs damages $11,110. E. M. Cate 
and W. ANickers(m, .588feet. $18; total $10,960. J. 
M. Roberts, corner of Purchase sti'eet, 78(l,feet, $22 — 
$17,660. Ariel Low and (;., W. Hersey, Purchase to 
High street, 517 feet, $15— $8,555. Edwin H. Sampson, 
corner of High street, 112 feet, $-M— $;J038. G. W. & 
F. Smith, 164-166 High street, 95 feet, $15— $1575. 
Charles A. Welch, trustee, No. l.'iH do, 91 feet, $15— 
$1500. Catherine Ford, 156 do. 97 feet, $15- $1600. 
Theodore Harrington, 1.54 do, 111 feet, $15— $1800. 
Martin H. P.ancroft, 1.52 do, 124 feet, $1.5— $2000. 
Charles H. Dodge, ;M7 feet, $11— $:i9S0. Natlian 
Matthews, 128-136 do, 674 feet, $1.3— $9300. David 
Snow, 114-108 do, 1143 feet, $12— $M,.516, John Col- 
lamore, 100-102 do, 421 feet, ,$11— $lil31. H. & F. A. 
Whitwell, execut;ors, 94-98 do, 502 feet, $12— $(B50. 
Heirs of Mary Powers, 84-92 do, 7(il feet, $12— $11,9.50. 
William Slieafe, 80-82 do, 770 feet, $15-$12,000 
Ricliard Baker, Jr., 78 do., 251 feet, $13— $;M70. Wil- 
liam F. Weld, 72 do., 121 fec^t, $14— $18:i0. E. M. Ab- 
bott and E. S. Bangs, 61-70 do., 75(i feet, $16— $12,496. 
Heirs of Nathaniel Snow. .58-6(1, do., ;|10 feet, $16— 
.$5(i40. William Minot, Jr., trustee, 5t-.56do., 317 feet, 
$16— $5272. Vk (!. Boardman, 4(i-.52 do., 510 feet, $18 
—$9,500. John P. Oilman, 42-44 do., 3.59 feet, $18— 
$6:!70. Edward 1 ). Peters, ;-!2-;^6 do., 406 feet, $18— 
.$7650. Andrew T. Hall, 26-.30 do., 310 feet, $18— $64.50. 
S. H. Russell, trustee ,;i 1-21 do., 473 feet, $20— $10,(K)() 
V. (i. & L. A. Shaw, trustees, corner of Milk street. 
1.S5 feet, $25— $.5,300. Jose])li L. Cunningham, corner 
of Milk street, 884 feet, $.35— $31 .:«). Charlotte A. 
Johnson, 7-19 Federal street, 1:^44 feet, $20— $27,555. 



83 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



Jameis H. Beul, 21-25 do., 582 foct, $18— $10,850. 
Oeoro-e C. RielKivdMoii, 27-89 do., 910 feet, f 18— $17,()00. 
James Lawrence and othors, trustees, -11— 19 do., 589 
feet, $16— .'J;9201. Oardner Brewer, 51 to corner of 
Franklin street, 821 feet, $20— $7080. -lolin Riteliie, 
John KitcJiie, 2d, and Klizaheth Lewis, corner of 
Franklin, 48 feet, $17— $1100. John Kilchie. 2d, and 
Elizabeth Lewis, 09-71 Franl^lin, .57 feet, $11— $1040. 
John Starrett, No. 78 do., 07 feet, $14— $1180. Georoe 
T. Bigelow and otlier.s, trnslces, 91 do., 115 feet, $10- 
$1850. Danid Snow, 108-107 do., 71 feet, $1.8— $1800. 
Nathan Matthews, 111-115 do., 87 feet, $13-$731. 
Isaac Pratt, Jr. and T. F. Tobey, 117-121 do., 5 ft. $18 
-$130. H, H. Hnnnewetl, 127-131 do., 15 feet, $18— 
$345- Heirs of J. G. Torrey. I33-141 do., 140 feet, $12 
— $2150. D. L. and J. G. Webster, corner of Milton 
place, 124 feet, $15— $2100. H. F. Smith, 1.5.5-1.57 do., 
209 feet, $18— $.5217. S. B. Spanlding, 1.59 do.. 308 
feet, $27— $10,201. Leonard Ware, corner of High 
street, .590 feet, $19-$11,910. Charles B. Cook, 181- 
183 do,, 93 feet, $22-$2800. Total, 18,408 feet, at 
$324,.592; damages, $17,277— $341,809. The several 
items of damages range from $65 to $800. 

Alderman Claik stated that all of these widenings 
had been before the Committee on Streets, who had 
given them fnll consideration and were in favor of 
them all. There was no occasion for delay, and it 
was desirable to send them at once to the Common 
Council. They were satisfied that they were the best 
widenings wlii'cli could be made for the benefit of the 
Government. 

In the matter of land damages, it was believed to 
be better to have all these measures passed at the 
present time, and that none of them should be laid 
over. 

Alderman Clark moved that the order take its sec- 
ond reading at the present time. 

The second reading was ordered, and the question 
was on its passage. 

Alderman Power hoped the order would not be 
passed, as it was an important departure from the 
plan first drawn up by Mr. Davis, City Surveyor, 
which was generally accepted. Federal streel was 
an important thoroughfare, and it should he widened 
so as to prevent the blockade at the corner of Milk 
and Congress streets. It was more important than any 
other measure which will come befoie the Govern- 
ment, and this had better be carried out rightly if all 
others had to he abandoned. He was surprised at 
the remarks of tlie Street Commissioners, and be- 
lieved the improvement was as nnuli needed as was 
the extension of \\'ashingtou street or Devonshire 
street. 

Alderman Qiiincy believed the petitioners yester- 
day made oiit a good case, and he was in favor of the 
change proposed, believing that it would he better to 
have delay than to make a mistake in the widening of 
the street. 

A petition was presented from Michael F. Lynch, 
asking for a delay in the widening of Federal street, 
and asking to be heai'd on the snb.iect. 

Alderman Clark stated that the little plan before 
them, made by Mr. Davis in about a week after the 
fire, was of a general character only, which gave a 
favorable inii)ressi(iii. l)ut upon mature rcllertion it 
was believed that imijoi-tant changes should be made. 
Some of these changes he indicated ; and in relation to 
the blockade in question, he said it was not neces- 
sary that testimony slio\ild be introduced here to 
show it, for they were all awari' of it. Yet that 
blockade was not greater than in many other places, 
and the various extensions ot the streets would 
greatly relieve that i)ortion of the sti'eet. 

The Street Commissioners,he said, had had this sub- 
ject under consideration for nearly three months, 
and in the various hearings which had taken place it 
was believed that threc-foniths of those who had paid 
attention to it were in favor of the plans of the Com- 
missioners. The additional expense of the widening 
as wished by those who asked for the widening on the 
easterly side, would cost $200,000 more than that of 
the plan of the Connnissioners. No widening could 
be made satisfact(H-y to all persons, and in regard to 
the width, some of those who are o])))osed to the 
plan of the Commissioners agree that the street 
should be si.xty feet in width. 

In i-egard U> the importance of immediate action, 
he said,"if the order should not be jjassed, as pro- 
posed, it would cause a delay of at least four weeks, 
and that to the great inconvenience of o«iiers of 
property, who would have not less than 1.50 buildings 
nncler construction at the end of the period named if 
they could have their lines at once. 

Aldeiman Power did not questiim that the Com- 
missioners had consistently discharged their duty, 
yet they had changed their miiuls, as it appeared. 
The change of the lines of Federal street to 
connect more fully with Congress street, would 
be more important than the widening of the street. 



As to blocks elsewliere there could be no doubt that 
if the territory where they occur ^vas burned over, im- 
provements would 1)0 made to prevent such blocks. 
In relation to the perscnis who have taken part in the 
matter, those who asked for a change had no per- 
sonal interest, while there wen^ interests involved in 
favor of the plans of the Commissioners. 

Alderman Clark said he had not intended to allude 
to interests of ))arHcs who appeared here, yet it was 
in evidence that some of those who favored a change 
were interested. It would he impossible to make 
Federal street a straight street, and although the 
Commissioners did noi, at first agree in all matters, 
they did so finally. There is now no difference of 
opinion as to the manner of widening. 

Alderman Power said, in regard to Eastern avenue, 
which had been alluded to, there was no positive de- 
termination as to where it shall come in, and it may 
as likely to be at Federal as at Congress street. Xt 
any rate, Federal street woidd always be a largely 
travelled street, and it would be better to widen that 
properly rather than put a foot Of widening on Con- 
gress street. 

Alderman (Juincy said he did not doubt that the 
Street Commissioners had conscientiously discharged 
their duties, but he believed the petitioners of yes- 
terday made out their case, and it was now a matter 
of responsiliility upon this Board how it was best to 
make the widening of Federal street. 

Alderman Clark called attention to the fact that in 
the negotiations last year t was determined that the 
Eastern avenue would come in at Congress street, 
and it would not be many years before the improve- 
ment was made. 

Alderman Power said that his belief of the matter 
was that the Eastern avenue would not come in at 
Congress but at Federal street, and he did not be- 
lieve the city would agree to the terms of the Boston 
& Albany Kailroad Company, and under such cir- 
cumstances it was not likely that the improvement 
would be made short of ten years. 

Alderman Gaffield stated that the improvements 
made were not f(U' temporary purposes but for all 
time, and while some peisons weie in favor of very 
wide streets and others were opposed to any widen- 
ings, the Commissioners had taken a golden mean. 
In relation to the Eastern avenue he had been assured 
that it must come in .at Congress street. If there had 
been no detei'mimition to go beyond a fifty-foot 
street, he did not believe there would have been any 
oppo.sition. It was due to the Commissioners and to 
all parties interested that this matter should be set- 
tled at once. 

Alderman Hnlbert defined his position as a member 
of the Committee on Streets. He was in favor of 
fifty feet both for Federal and Congress streets. 
Federal street could never be as it was. because otiier 
avenues had been oi)ened, which would relieve thai 
street. On the grounds of business and of business 
interests he advocated the widening of the streets to 
fifty feet oidy, and he believed it would be an injury 
to business by having wide streets. Wool dealers did 
not seek Congress street because it was wide; on the 
contrary, they sought to be in crowds, where it was 
busy, and that was the policy of the best business 
men. It was not desirable to have wide streets for 
business, except to get room for tlie business. The 
crowdiug of streets was not an unmitigated evil, and 
the widening of th(«n was not .-dways for good. 

If Federal sti'eet was to be fifty feet wide, it should 
he on the easterly side, and he should prefer not to ha^'c 
it any wider than that. Thebusiui'ss would be distrib- 
uted much more by theother street changes, and Frank- 
lin street would b(^ much better for business should it 
be narrowed up. Sliould the crowded streets be much 
widened, the crowds would seek business quarters 
elsewhere. As ti> the Post(.)tlice being acomnuui cen- 
tre of business, hi^ denied it, for it could iu)t be. As 
to the cost, the dilfiu'enoe between fifty and sixty feet 
streets for Feiha-al and Congri^ss streets would be 
$l,tH)0.O0O, which would add $100,000 yearly to their 
tax bills, and the whole cost of the street widening 
on the burnt district, with the paving, would not be 
less than $(;,O0lt,(ll)0. For these reasons he could not 
favor the proposed widening.s. 

Alderman Clai-k beliieved the Alderman to be incor- 
rect in his calculations, for the whole expense of 
widening Federal and Congress streets, as estimated 
by the Commissioma's, was but $850,000. 

Alderman Hulbert, in reply, stated that the es- 
timates before Ihe Board did not include the widen- 
ing of Congress street, from Water sti-eet to State 
street. His figures would make about a million of 
dollars when ihe bills wei-e all paid, mni-h allowance 
being necessary in settling u)) damages. 

Alderman Clai'k (juestioned the figures of Alder- 
man Hnlbert, ami stated that he knew something of 
the reasons why wool dealers went to Congress 
street, which was for cheap rents and abundance of 



FEBrtU ARY 37 



1873. 



83 



loft I'ooin. Ill that stroet lantl hnd sold williiii three 
yi'iirs l'or$12 a loot wilh good granite biiiUliiigs ii])ob 
ir, iiiul since tlie tire sah'S had been made of hind in 
tlial stieet at JIT) a foot. The Aldei-man practieallv 
faAdred wide sli-eets wliile lie was in business, re- 
ino\ iiiL^- from narrow to wide streets. 

Alderman lliill)ert, in further statements, said liusi 
iiess mtMi wonhl go where tlien^ was room, and whe.re 
there was a crowding in tlu^ kind of business done. 
In his own case, he removed from oilier considera- 
tions than a wide street. In regard to the costs, he 
made additional statements, citing the chairman of 
the Strc<'t Commissioners as I'stimating the cost of 
the widening of C'ongress street to State street. a(hli 
tional, to be fdriO.UOO. 

Alderman Clark declared the Boston Post OfBce to 
be the centre of l)nsiness, not necessarily, but in 
fact; for the value of land was much more within a 
radius of half a mile of the Post Ollice than it was 
beyond, lie was not satislied witli the tignres of the 
Alderman, and conld not agree to tlieni. 

Alderman Qiiincy agreed with Alderman Hulbert 
that it was better to have streets of a moderate 
width than to have them wide, iirovided there was a 
pulsation In the How, and he had been assured by a 
dry-goods dealer that Federal street would be w'ide 
enough at fifty feet, with a rounding olT at the corner. 

Aldermen ihilbert and Clark made fuTther state- 
ments in sustaining their respective positions, the 
last named stating that a portion of Federal street 
had been tifty feet wide, and that portion was often 
blockaded. 

Alderman Gibson said he was at first disposed to 
agree with Alderman Hulbert. but on looking at the 
plans he conld do no other than agree that the 
Commissioners had done the best wliich could be 
done, taking the connections through from depots to 
depots. He was willing t<) compromise in width at 
tifty-live feet, and would agree to making Federal 
street sixty feet and Congress street lifty feet. 

Alderman Gatlield said the committee had beeu 
importuned to give a width of at least sixty feet to 
this street, and it was a happy mean, for many per- 
sons advocated a much greater width. Reference 
was made by hiin to the various proposed changes, 
and he believed the expense of improvements, al 
though great, would l)ring hack revenue to the city 
in betterments. It was not true, that widening 
streets diminished their vahie, as he knew from the 
charge of an estate on Hanover street, which rented 
for 3;J per cent, more with diminished room from the 
widening. 

Alderman Clibsoii made some further remarks upon 
the effect of the extension of Washington street, and 
the opening of more direct routes of travel. 

Alderman Hulbert moved to amend by making the 
proposed widening fifty feet instead of sixty feet. 

The t'hair ruled that the amendment could not be 
entertained, the question being upon concurring or 
non-concurring with the Str<'et Commissioners. 

Alderinan Hulbert moved to recommit, with in- 
structions to the Street Commissioners to provide 
for the widening wf Federal street to fifty feet. 

Alderman Clark opposed the motion on account of 
the delay which would be occasioned by recominit- 
tiniJ, the loss to the community being not less than 
$50,000 a day. 

Alderman Quincy said he would vote for the mo- 
tion could it be moc ified to provide for a widening of 
sixty feet from ('banning street to Milk street on 'tlie 
easterly side. 

Alderman (Jaflield opposed the motion, and he be- 
lieved that if all the members of the Board had beeu 
on the committee they would liavo agreed with them 
generally. 

Alderman Sayward opposed delay, stating tliat he 
was prepiired to vote at once, and was wiuui he came 
to the Board today. 

Alderman Kniery opposed delay, and the reductioa 
of the street to fifty feet. If the width was to be but 
fifty feet, the widening shoulil be on the easterly side. 
With the widening to sixty feet, he l)elieved the pill) 
lie would be generally accommodated. Congress 
street and Federal street, both at sixty feet, mus^t ac- 
commodate travel at present and prospectively. 

AlfJerman (Jibson believed it would be better to 
widen on the westerly side, as leading the travel 
neare. to Devonshire street, which would be the 
most desirable street to travel in. The termination 
would be much better through Devinishire street than 
through Congress street. 

Alderman Kniery stated further that he favored 
the plans of the Commissioners. 

The question was taken on recommitting, which 
was lost, by a vote of 2 to 10, as follows; 

Yeas — Hulbert, Power. 

Nays — Bigelow, Brown, Clark, Cutter, Emery. Oat- 
field, Gibson, (Juincy. Sayward, Slehbins. 



The concnrronce in the passage of tlie order was 
agreed to liy a vote of 8 to 4, as follows: 

Yeas— Bigelow, Clark, Cutter. Emery, Gaffield, 
Gibson, Sayward, Stcbbins. 

Nays— Brown, Hulbert, Power, Quincy. 

WIDENING OF MILK STRBKT. 

Resolve and order for the widening of Milk street, 
by taking land of (lie several parties therein named, 
at an expense of .f-2(l7,4()2. 

The resolve and order were passed, under suspcn 
sion of the rules. 

The several items were as follows: 

Heirs of Samuel Davis and others, No. 3 Milk 
street, (1.5 feet, *H.'3— $807.5. Nathaniel L. Willliams, 
Nos. 5-7 do., ;«5 feet, $50— $17,250; damages, $;«e 
—$17,(100. Heirs of Joseph Bumstead, CJharles Pope, 
triislee, ]1-1:J do., 205 feet, .$45; damages, $1000— to- 
tal, $10,22.5. Owner unknown, jiassage, 141 feet, 
Charles M. Parker, 15-17 do., 400 feeet,, $25; dam- 
ages, ,$200— total, $10,425. Mary T. (Joddard, 19-25 
do., 578 feet, .$25; damages, $200— $14,900. Jacob 
Sleeper, 27-35 do., 193 teet, $20; damages, $400— 
$4;:110. Owners unknown, Morton place, 107 feer. 
William Dwight and others, triislees. ;J7-13 do., 192 
and 205 feet, .$25; damages. 400— $11,825. George P. 
Upham, 4.5^7 do., .5;« feel, $(((; damages, $300— $21,- 
580. Heirs of T. B. Lawrence, .55-(il do., 481 and 495 
feet, $32 50; damages, $500— $;i2,220. D. W. Wil- 
liams and Jona. French, trustees, (i;M)5 do., 3()4 feet, 
.$:«; damages, $250-$l 1,898. R. T. Paine, Jr., and 
others, (;7-ti9 do. , 1:^0 feet, .$29 ; damages, $2.50— $12,720. 
Jos. L. (,'unningham, 71-75 do., 4:^0 feet, $29; dam- 
ages, $400— $2(i,090. F. G. & Q,. A. Shaw, trustees. 
77-79 do. (i(i2 feet, $27; damages, $350— $18,224. Levi 
L. Tower, 81-83 do., 572 feet, $25; damages, $14,000. 
Jos. G. Russell, 8.5-87 ds., .5.55 feet, $31); damages, 
$.350— $17.0110. Heirs of Jos. Whitnev, 91 do., 404 
feet, $20; damages, $250— $8380. Win. S. Dexter. 
318 feet, $20; dainages. $2.50— $0(110. Heirs of John 
P. Gushing, 9.5-97 do., I8(i feet, $23; dainages, .$2.50— 
$11,078. Moses Williams, 92-9-1 do., 70 feet, $23: 
damages, $250- $18(i0. Heirs of Thos. Cordis, 9t)-98 
do., lU feet, $18; damages, $200— $2til2. Robert C. 
Waterston, 100-102 do., ;i08 feet, $18; damages, .$:350 
—$.5894. Samuel Atherton, 104 do., 510 feet, $23; 
dainages, ,$40lt— $12,1:W. Liberty-sipiare Warehouse. 
112-110 do., 991 feet, $10; dainages, $800— $16,056. 
Total, 10,576 feet, $288,912; damages, $85.50— 
.$297,4(i2. 

WIDBNINCi AND EXTENSION OF rEARI. STREET. 

Resolve and order for the extension of Pearl to 
Congress street, at Water street, at an expense of 
$170,300. 

The resolve and order were passed in concurrence. 

The several items of expense arc as follows: 

Heirs of John Tappan, 99-101 Milk street, 168 feet. 
$20, $m<0: damages $.540— ,$;3900. Moses Williams; 
88-90 do., 617 feet, .|:M, $18,510, damages $49()-$19.- 
000. Ellen Stearns, 84-86 do., 2040 feet, $23, $46,920: 
dainages $880— $17,800. James Lawrence and others, 
trustees, 2 to 5 Bath street, 14.57 feet, $13, $18,9 11 : dam- 
age, $:M9~$19,250. James Lawrence, 80-82 Milk street, 
1785 feet, $19, $;«,915; damages $.5;i5— $;«,450. Heirs 
of James A'ila, 1 Bath street, 2(W3 feet, $13, $:H,:i59: 
damages, $891— $;«,250. Unknown owners, passage- 
way 1203 feet. J. C. Howe and J. J. French. 67 
Water street, :i44 feet, $30— $10,:«0; dainages, $:«0— 
$10,(i.50. Total 10,2.57 feet, $166,325; dainages, $:»75 
— $170,;»0. 

EXTENSION OP OEIVEK STREET. 

Resolve and order for the extension of Oliver 
street, at an estimated expense of $131,220. 

Alderman IluUiert ojjposed the order as unneces- 
sary, and it was advocated by Alderman Clark as an 
important improvement. 

Alderman (Jaltield, as an additional reason for the 
order, said the city owned fifty thousand feet of land 
on Fort Hill, which would be greatly ln4tered by this 
extension. 

The order was passed in concurrence. 

The several items of expense are as follows: 

Liberty-square Warehouse Company, 108-110 Milk 
street, 4772 fei-t, $18, $85.89(;; damage's, $1500— total. 
$87,39(i. Heirs of John Belknaj). 66-64 Kilby street. 
779 feet, ,$20, $15,.580; damages, $100— $1.5,98("). Dan- 
iel P. Stone, ()2-60 Kilby street, .5.53 feet. .$20, $11,060: 
damages, $:i50— $11,410. Benjamin F. White, .58 Kil- 
by street, 592 feet, $27, $15,984; damages, $450- 
$1(i,4:W. 

WIDENINO OF C'ONCiRESS STREET. 

Resolve and order for the widening of Congress 
street Ix'tween Water and Broad streets, at an esfi- 
maled expeiisi' of $514,795. 

The order being on its passage. Alderman Power 
opposed the widening beyond a widlli of fifty fret, as 
unnecessary, never to be a greatly travelled thorough- 



84r 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



fare, and not to connect with Eastern avenue, at 
least for many years, If ever. 

Akternian C'lark advocated the order as called for 
by business men. and an improvement which will be 
very imjiortant in the fntnre. He believed the ex- 
])ense of connectini; with Eastern avenne would be 
much less by vyay of Congress street than by Federal 
street, and an appeal to the City Surveyor assured 
him that such was the case, on account of conflict 
with the Hartford & Erie Railroad Depot. 

Alderman I'ower denied that there would be any 
conflict with the Hartford & Eric Kailroad. On the 
contrary, it would be in harmony with that railroad, 
and they wished the connection there. 

Alderman C^lark reiterated his statement in relation 
to the Eastern avenne. and the building of a bridge 
at the Hartford & Erie Depot would interfere with 
then- bridge. 

Alderman Hulbert agreed injrelation to the location 
of Eastern avenue witli Alderman Clark, yet he did 
not believe the street should be more than fifty feet 
in width. 

The order was passed, by a vote of 10 to 2, as fol- 
lows: 

Yeas— Bigelow, Brown, Clark, Cutter, Emery, Gaf- 
field, Gibson, Quincy, Say ward, Stebbins. 
Nays — Hulbert, Power. 
The several items were as follows: 
Rnfns G. Norris, Nos. 2.5.'5-2.'57 Congress street, 634 
feet, $11, with damages, S'T.'iUO. S. R. Spanlding, 251. 
25:3 do., 2:3!) feet. .*'.)— |2:30O. J. P. Preston, 24:3-24!» do.. 
5:38 feet, $11— ^ra.""*. James Hyndman, 2:K-2:37 do.. 
228 feet, 11:3 -$;3200. Heirs of Benjamin Willis, 2:31- 
2.33 d©.,220 feet, $10— $2450. L. L. Fuller, 227-229 
do., 220 feet, .f 10— $24.50. E. C. Milliken, 2:3:3-2:35 
do., 225 feet, $10— .f2500. S. R. Spanlding. 219 do.. 
749 feet, $15— $11,800. Joseph B. Moors, 201-209 do., 
817 feet, $l(i— $14,500. Henry Poor ^t Son, ]8fH99 do., 
755 feet, $10— .piOO. B. G. Boardnian, 181-187 elo., 
753 feet, $9— .$7:310. W. B. Spooner. l(i:3-173 do., 813 
feet, $11— .$9600. Heirs of George Parkman, 267 feet, 
$13- $:3600. Ale.xander H. Reed, 1.55 do., 175 feet. $1:3— 
$2400. Sampson and Davenport, 153 do., 4 feet, $1.5— 
$60. H. H. Hunnewell, trustee, 145 do., 242 feet, $10— 
$2600. James M. Cook. 131-1:37 do., 710 feet, $10— $7600. 
B. G. Boardnian, 123-129 do., *41 feet, $10— $2410. 
Heirs of Peter Coffin, 117-21 do., 51 feet, $10— $510. 
P. H. Stimpson, 60-62 do., 1498 feet, $33— $.50,3,50. 
James Parker, 64-66 do., 2385 feet. ,$28- $65,000. James 
Leeds, 68-76 do., 26:36 feet, $:3:3— |8S,000. Joseph G. 
Russell, 86-88 do., 1491 feet, $.30- .$45,400. Heirs of 
Joseph Whitney, 90-94 do., S:37 feet, $18-$15,700. 
Heirs of John Pleatt, 96-102 do., 9:36 feet, $16— $15,400. 
H. J. Plafl, 106-16 do., 1441 feet, $14— $20,800. Heirs 
«>f J. W. Fenno, 118-20 do., 406 feet. $14— $6000. An- 
drew J. Morse, 122-26 do., 6:34 feet, $11— $7:300. James 
Lawrence and others, trustees. 1:30 do., 6:33 feet. $11 — 



$7370. Heirs of George H. Blackburn, 136-40 do., 
449 feet, $10— $4900. F. R. Sears, guardian, 144-^8 do., 
386 feet, $10-$-l200. Heirs of F. Allen, 1.50 do., 71 
feet, $10— $800. Heirs of F. S. Carruth, 160-62 do., 
:3()7 feet, $11— $:3600. John S. Potter, 164-66 do., 
245 feet, $12— $:3200. W. B. Spooner, 168-174 do., .523 
feet, $12— .$6700. F. M.Johnson and A. Thompson. 
176-82 do. , 628 feet, $1 1— $7:350. Ebon B. Phillips, 18-1-86 
do., 295 feet, $1 1—$:3500, Edward Brooks, passageway 
174 feet. E. B. Phillips, 188-94 do, 474 feet, $11— $.5600. 
JamesO.Safford,196-98do.260feet,$ll— $3100. Thomas 
E. Proctor, 200-ti do, 872 feet, $15— $13,750. E. B. 
Phillips, 210 do, 6:37 feet, $15— $10,000. James Tut- 
tle, 471 feet, $10— $5050. Heirs of Samuel May, 2:30- 
:34 do, 824 feet, $10— .$8240. E. B. Phillips, 246-.52 do, 
531 feet, $11— $6,300. Heirs of F. S. Carruth, 2.54-.56 
do, 241 feet, $9-2:300. William F. Weld, 258-60 do, 
649 feet, $11— $7(il5. Total, 28,779 feet, $496,922; 
damages, $17,87:3— $514,795. The items of damage 
varied from ,$90 to ,$1020. 

WIDKNlNi; AND EXTENSION OF PRANKMN STREET. 

Resolve and order for widening and extension of 
Franklin street, by taking land of the several persons 
therein named at an expense of $314,892. 

The order was passed, in concurrence. 

Tlie several items were as follows: 

Heirs of Isaac Rich, Nos. 81-83 Franklin street, 517 
square feet, $28, $14,476; damages $4.50— total $14,926. 
John Rilchie and others, Nos. 8.5-91, 1084 feet, $18. 
$19,512; damages $800— $20,312. William F. Weld, 
Nos. 72-74 Federal street, :3116 feet, $14, $4:3,624; 
damages $4.50— $44,074. Richard Baker, Jr., Nos. 76- 
78 do., 1997 feet, $13, $25,961; damages $450— $26,411. 

E. M. Abbott and E. S. Bangs, No. 70 do., 2 feet, $13, 
$26. James M. Cook, Nos. 1:31-1:37 Congress street, 1 
foot, $8. H. H. Hunnewell, trustee. Nos. 145-1.51 Con- 
gress street, 4:358 feet, $10, .$43,580; damages $400— 
$43,980. Heirs of George Parkman, Nos. 8-11 Channing 
street, 21 feet. $7, $1-17. Sampson & Davenport, 153 
Congress street, 485 feet, $15, $7275; damages $250— 
$7,525. Alexander H. Read, 1.55 Congress street, 7 
feet, $1.5, $10.5. Heirs of F. Allen, 1.50-1.5-1 do., .3925 
feet, $10, $;39,2.50; damages $600— $:39,850. Heirs of 

F. S. Carruth, 156-162 do., 1544 ft., $12, $18,.528; dam- 
ages $400— $18,928. Wales Tucker, 51-49 Pearl .street, 
1474 feet,, $15, $22,110; damages, $550— $22,660. 
James Leeds, Nos. .5:3-55 do., 2:306 feet, $17, $:39,202; 
damages .$850— $40,0.52. Heirs of Freeman Allen. 57- 
59 do.; 2517 feet, $14, $:35,2:38; damages $650— $;35.888. 
Total, 2:3.;3.54 feet, $309,042; damages, $.58.50- $314,892. 

Alderman Clark moved a reconsideration, with a 
view to sending the several orders to the 'Common 
Council, hoping the motion would not prevail. 

Alderman Power wished the question to be taken 
an each separately, which was lost, when the recon- 
sideration was lost. 

Adjourned. 



OOMMOlSr OO IT NOIL. 



85 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 
••'injiajyVKY y7, i87o. 



The regular weekly meeting of the t'ommon C'oun 
ell was held this evening, at IX o'clock, E. O. Shep- 
ard, tlie President, in the chair. 

PAPERS PBOM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The petitions of Whitcomb & Potter, Patrick 
Campbell, Winchester & Hight, Nehemiah Barry and 
the communication of the First BaiJtist Society of 
Boston were severally referred, in conenrreuce. 

The annual report of ■ the Inspector of Buildings 
was ordered to be placed on file. 

The following reports were accepted, in concur- 
rence : 

Report of reference to the Water Board of the sub- 
ject of establishing a drinking trough at the corner of 
Tremont-aud Cabot streets. 

Heport (no action necessary) on remonstrance of 
S. S. Perkins and others, against proyjosed erection 
of an engine house on Uplon street. 

Reports (leave to withdraw) on petitions — 

1. Of Elwnezer E. Hill, to be paid for loss on ac- 
count of use of his house, (ifi Hudson street, as a 
smallpox hospital. 

2. Of Jane Logue, for compensation as a smallpox 
nurse. 

The order to pay bills of certain police cfflcers for 
extra services was read once. 

The non-concurrence in the referrence to the Com 
mittee on Engineer's Department, and passage of the 
order for City Engineer to inspect the arched en- 
trances for towers of Boston & Lowell Depot, came 
np for action. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward (i said that the Council would 
perhaps concur in the passage of the order, should 
t'le gentleman who offered the order give some rea- 
sons for its passage. 

Mr. Jones, of Ward 14 moved that the Conncil re- 
cede from its reference. 

Mr. Perkins repeated that no reason had yet been 
given for the passage of the order. 

Mr. Dean of Waid 1-2 said that from the character 
of those who were engaged in the construction of 
the building, it was prima fade evidence that it was 
properly constructed, as much so as any in the city. 
Before they meddled with the matter, they should 
know something about it. 

Mr. Pease said it would appear to be the object of 
the other branch to send the order immediately to 
the Engineer. In answer to an inquiry of Mr. Per- 
kins, the occurrence of today, he said, sliowed the 
necessity of looking after all buildings believed to be 
unsafe. 

Mr. Jones said it wonld be a matter of courtesy in 
any event, if the committee reported in favor of it, 
to refer it to the City Engineer, and it might as well 
go to him to be looked after at once. Many people 
believe these arches to be unsafe, and it wonld be as 
well to have them examined. 

Mr. Mahan of \^''ard 5, of the Committee on the 
Engineer's Department, said the committee would 
make no objection to scmding the order at once to the 
Engineer. 

Mr. Perkins objected to acting upon orders without 
knowing reasons for them, otherwise they would be 
constantly sending the City Engineer from Dan to 
Beersheba. 

Mr. Jones said there were many who believed the 
arches in ([uestion to be unsafe, being merely tied 
together, and the sooner the security of them was 
looked into the better. 

The Clouncil receded from the reference, and con- 
curred in the passage of the order. 

ELECTION OP PIRST-ASSISTANT-ASSESSOR. 

The certificate of the election of James Dennie as a 
First. Assistant-Assessor in place of Artemas R. 
Holden, chosen by the Council, was read, when the 
Council proceeded to an e!ecti(m, which resulted as 
follows: 

Wliole nam her of votes 5G 

Necessary to a choice a9 

Artemas R. HolUc^n a» 

James Dennie Vi 

James K . C'rovvley (i 

H. N. Holbrook 5 

Theopilus Burr 4 

Mr. Holden was declared to be again elected, in 
nonconcurreuce. 



STREET WIDENINGS. 

The Chair stated that he would take up first the pa- 
l)ers received from tlui Board of Alderiuen 1oday, lie- 
fore taking action upon the Salary bill. 

WIDENING OP OriAlFNCY STREET. 

The resolve and order for the widening of Cnumncy 
str(!et was read once, and Mr. Pease of Ward 1 moved 
a susi)ension of the rules for the passage of the order 
tonight. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward (i said it was the opinion of 
members of the Committee on Streets that it would 
b(^ better not to pass the various street widenings to- 
night. 

Mr. Pease said it was known to every one that the 
owners of land in these streets were very anxious to 
build, and the Street Commissioners and the Com- 
mittee on Streets had given the matter very careful 
hearings, and the sooner they were disposed of the 
better. 

Mr. Perkins replied that the gentleman might have 
authority to sjioak fin- others, but not for the Com- 
mittee on Streets. The Street Commissioners were 
of opinion that all of these cu'ders should l)e passed 
at once, and for that reason they did not wish to have 
action upon two when there were half a dozen con- 
nected together. Rather than compel the city to pay 
more for land in consequence of the passage of any 
oni^ of them, they should all lie over. 

The original and favorite plan was to have Federal 
street run into t'ongress street, thus making it a con- 
tinuous street. The plan was changed to allow the 
enlargement of the Post Oflice, to which it was be- 
lieved the (ieneral Government was inclined. At the 
last meeting of the committee, a communication was 
laid before them from Hie Secretary of Hie Treasury, 
relative to the widening of the streets opjiosite the 
Post OBice, and the House of Representatives was 
in favor of the plan of the Postmaster to have a space 
on Congress street of eighty feet. The plan before 
the Senate was to lay out the whole triangular piece 
of land between Congress and Pearl streets, and as it 
is believed they are opposed to further aiqiiopriat ions 
for public buildings in Boston; theCityCoiincil should 
not act until the action of Congress was definitely 
settled. It was desirable that the course of the Gov- 
ernment should be known, and if the additional piece 
of land is not to be taken then the origuial plan of 
Federal street should be carried out. Nothing would 
be lo.st, then, by a delay of one week. 

Mr. Pease said his object was to facilitate matters, 
and tliat ^^'as his reason for the motion made by him. 
He did not pretend to speak for the committee, and 
this measure was not connected with the otliers. 

Mr. Perkins said he understood that the committee 
would have no objection to the passage of the order 
for the widening of Chauncy street. 

The rules were suspended, and the order was 
passed 

WIDENINfJ op FEDERAL STREET. 

The resolve and order for the widening of Federal 
street was read once. 

Mr. Denny of Ward 9 said he did not fully under- 
stand the reasons of the g;entleman from Ward C for 
postponement. The subject had been under con- 
sideration nearly four months, and it was necessary 
for the owners of property to eommenee forthwith 
the rebuilding of their stores as so(m as their lines 
were fixed. After the deliberations of the Street 
Commissioners and the action of the Board of Alder- 
men, they could safely act upon the conclusions to 
which they had come, and unless there were serious 
objections in each instance, action could be taken at 
once in their passage. The owners of land were 
clamorous for action, and great blame would be cast 
upon them for any unnecessary delay. 

It was not the Street Commissioners, but others, 
who iiad caused the delay, and many jiersons were 
of ojiinioii that the Street Commissioners should have 
acted independeatly of what others might say, and fix 
the lines, whoever it might hurt. The damage had 
been very great from the delay, and there had been no 
hasty legislation and could be no objection to passing 
each one of those orders to which no objection could 
be made. 

Mr. Perkins said the Commissioners and the com- 
mittee were unanimous in their o])inion as to each of 
these measures except the widening of Federal street. 
They wore atfirst in favor of a through street, and if 
the Government does not want the additional land 
for the Post Oflice, Federal street would be laid out 
through that land. Otherwise it would be better to 
turn the travel down iiistea<l of uj) I'lom Federal 
street. It would he absolutely imiiossilile to comply 
with the terms of the iruit,ed States House of Repre- 
sentatives in the widening of streets, and befoi-e the 
next meeting of the C^ouncil the question must be 



86 



COMMON COUNOIL, 



.settled liy Congress. If it must be a cliDice l)etweeii 
that and the plan of the Street Commissioners, the 
last mnst be chosen, as reconjuiended. 

Mr. Denny said if il was a qneslion of lines merely, 
and not I he wideninj;; of Federal street, he did not 
see why tliey could not discuss it tojiinht. Reasons 
could be given why the easterly and not the westerly 
side of the street should be cut olf. The questicni of 
widening had been fully discussed in the papers, and 
was fully understood, and if the ijuestion of widen- 
ing on the easterly side could he disposed of, he did 
not see why it could not be seltled tonight. 

Mr. Perkins Slid the Council might talk all night 
if they chose to. Referring again to the original 
plans, he gave the reasons for a change, on account 
of the Post Oflice, and if the Government would not 
take the land on Congress street, he thought the city 
had better run Federal street straight through it. 

Mr. Wells of Ward 3 could not see why the subject 
should not go over, for it would take from three to 
five weeks i;o clean out cellars in that neigliborhood, 
and nothing could be lost by allowing the matter to 
lie over. 

Mr. Deau of Ward Vi hoped the matter would not 
be pressed tonight. The subject had .iusi coun^ be- 
fore them, and was one of tlie greatest importance 
which could be acted upon. The public had little 
idea of the importan(;e of Fedeml street as a thorough- 
fare. 

The Chair stated that there was no question before 
the Council, and the debate had been out of order. 

Mr. Harrington of Ward .S moved a suspensi(m of 
the rules for the i)assage of the order. 

Mr. Burditt of Ward IG, said the Mayor was now in 
Washington in relation to the action on the subject 
of the Post Oflice, and on thai action this order 
liinges. The mayor would be at hom(! on Saturday 
or Monday, and it would be better to lune the matter 
lie over. 

Mr. West of Ward 16 hoped the (uder would not 
be passed now, for much deijcnded upon the action 
of Congress. It would not do any harm to let it lie 
over one week. 

Mr. Benny said he bad no desire in the slightest 
degree except to secure right action. There was a 
necessity for action, and if no obji'cli<iu was made to 
any particular measure, thal^ might be passed, the 
should act on every one they can. 

Mr. Perkins said he had been unfortunate if he had 
not made liimself understood. The Street Counuis- 
sioners did not wish to have action on any one of 
these tonight if they could not all be jiassed. If 
action should be taken on any one, it would afl'ecl the 
land to l)e taken in other cases, and it was tlii' desire 
to keep down the prices of land nnlil they were all 
passed. It was obvious that one alone should not he 
passed. There could be no time lost in laying the 
subject over one week. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward T said it was agreed by the com- 
mittee that they should be passed altogether, and 
there was no reason why they sh<uikl be Iiui'ried 
through tonight. They should all lie over. 

The question on sMspension of the rules was lost. 

The several orders for the widening of Milk sli-eet, 
the extension of Pearl street, the extension of Oliver 
street, the widening of Congress street, and the ex- 
tension of Franklin street were read once and laid 
over. 

SALARY r.ILI,. 

The report and orders establishing the salaries of 
city oflicers for the year, beginning the first day of 
April next, with amendments of the l?oard of Alder- 
men thereto (Printed City Doc. No. 27, 18T8,) were 
considered. 

Mr. West of Ward 16 moved that the report and or- 
ders be laid on the table, to allow time to look through 
them. 

Mr. Flyini asked to have the motion withdrawn to 
allow liiin to give notice of amendmimts. 

The motion «as withdrawn. 

Mr. Flynn gave notice that he should propose 
amendments to make the salary of Chief-of-Police 
$4000, c.-.ptains of police !|fl.5()(),' lieutenants .fMtiO, 
sergeants $1800, and patrobnen $1^200 per annum; 
also on page 16 to amend by making the salaries of 
Chief-Engineer of Fire Depaitment |;I0()(), assistant- 
engineers ,fT00 in place of $'>(I0, secretary of the 
board .$200(1; section 4, foremen of companies $525, 
instead of $;ii25; assistant-foremen, etc., clerks, etc., 
sections, $500; engiuemen $:i 75 per day; firemen 
,$3 .50 per day. 

Mr. West of Ward 16 asked if it was designed to 
strike out the distinctions against the members from 
Ward 16. 

Mr. Flynn replied that he did so design. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 raised the question by what 
rule any thing could be struck out which was not be- 
fore the Council. 



Mr. Flynn replied tliat he gave notice only of what 
he proposed to do when the subject should come up. 

Mr. Shaw wished to know where could be found 
sections 5 and 6 relating to firemen, because if he 
was called npou to act he should wish to know 
whctlu-r sMi-h seclious were before tht' board, and he 
would call for the reading of them. 

The Chair said there was no motion i)ending, and 
he stopped the reading of the report on a proposed 
queslion. There was nothing but the reading of the 
report before the Council, and the discussion was 
wholly irregular. 

Mr. West renewed his motion to lay the subject 
over. 

Mr. Flynn said if the gentleman from Ward 5 had 
put on his specs he wmild ha\e found the sections in 
question. 

Mr. Shaw called for the reading of the sections. 

The Chair stated thai he was going on to read the 
whole order wlicn he was slopped. 

Mr. Shaw said he only wished for the reading of a 
part of it. 

The Chair proceeded to read the orders. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 6 moved that the reading be 
dispensed with. 

Mr. Shaw claimed that under the rules, when any 
member called for the reading of an order oi' report, 
it was not conq)etent for any one to ask to dispense 
with the re.-iding. It was the right of any one that 
when he asked it should b(^ read. 

The Chair staled tbaMt was ccmipetent to call for 
(he reading, or that il be dispensed with. It was 
counx'tent to ask that a document be read by its title. 
In this case the Chair was sto])ped in his reading, and 
he should go on. The Chair should have proceeded 
to read. 

Mr. Perkins moved that the bill be read by its title, 
and the motion was carried. 

Mr. Shaw said he still had the right to call for the 
reading of the ordei- in full, or in detail, and he call- 
ed for the reading. He wantedio know what he was 
to vote upon. It was his right to have the order 
read, and it must be I'ead. 

The Chair said he would first decide on the q,ues- 
tiiui of order, and stated that as a general principle 
it was (•orr<Tl that a member had a right to have a 
document read, at any time. Vet a motion might 
also be made to have the reading by its title. 
The order would first be read by its title, and he now 
read it by title. 

The . 'hair then stated the question to be upon giving 
the orders a sec(md I'eading. 

Mr. Blackmar inquired if a motion had not been 
made lo iay the orders (ui the table; if not he would 
make th<' motion. 

The motion was put and carried. 

The Chair stated that there was a communica- 
tion from the Board of Aldermen, stating that se(;- 
tions I, 5. 6 and 7 of the orders relating to pay of the 
Fire l)e])artment had been stiicken from the orders 
and referred to the Committee on Fire Department. 

Mr. Wells of Wai'd 3 moved the further considera- 
tion of the subject he refer, ed to tlie next meeting of 
the Council. 

Mr. Blackmar of Ward 11 inquired if the refer- 
ences were not in the nature of an amendment of the 
oi'ders. 

The Chair ruled that they were not. 

Mr. Jones of Ward 14 inquired if the sections were 
not those stricken from the orders by the Boaid of 
Aldc^nnen. 

Mr, Sh.iw rose to a point of order, that the gen- 
tlema'n had no right to refer to the action of a coor- 
dinate branch of the (lovernment. He had a right to 
refer to whal was before them for their action, but 
not to crit<ise or lefer to any action of the other 
branch, which was out of order. 

The Chair said he did not understand the point of 
order mad(' by tlie uH>mb(!i- from Wai'd 5. 

Mr. Shaw replied Ihat the gentleman had no right 
to refer to any matter on the table, or that had been 
referred by the Board of Aldermen. 

The Chair did not understand what tlu^ gentleman 
considered as not in order. 

Mr. Shaw said he was stating his point of order. 

The Chair asked him to state it, there being nothing 
before the Council tiebatable. 

Mr. Shaw proceeded to state that sections 5, 6 and 
7 w ere laid on the table by the Board of Aldermen, 
and his friend had spoken of them as having been 
laid on the table or had been referred to a committee. 

Mr. b'lynn rose to a question of order, that the gen- 
tleman was not talking to the subject matter, and 
bad not raised any j)oint of order. 

The Chair stated as his understanding of the point 
of order, that the gentleman from Ward 14 was out 
of order for referring to the action of the Board ot 
Aldermen. He heard nothing improper in his all u- 



FEBRUARY 



2 



1873 



87 



siojis, and l.hero was nothing disrespectful in liis 
reference to tlie Board, which disrespectful allusions 
(done are not in order in cither branch towards tlie 
other. 

Mr. Jones said he was engaged when the commu- 
nication was read, and he made the inquiry for infor- 
mation. 

Mr. Wells seconded the motion for an assignment. 

Mr. Perkins inquired what the motion of assign- 
ment was. 

riie (hair stated that the Board of Aldermen had 
stricken out sections 4, 5, (i, and 7 of the order relating 
to the ijay of t,he Fire Department, and they were re- 
ferred to the Committee on Kire Uepartnient. 

Mr. Perkins moved that inasmuch as the others 
had been so disposed of, the communication and 
references be laid on the; tabic. Carried. 

XTNFINISHET) BUSINESS. 

The order that the Auditor of Accounts be autho.i- 
ized 1o allow for payment to the City Treasurer 
$1343 01, the amount paid by him on an execution In 
favor of Sylvester C-Jardner and Kosanna, his wife, 
for in.juries from a defect in a highway was read a 
second time and passed. 

I'ETlTnjNS PRESENTED AND EEPERRBD. 

Certain citizens and taxpayers, to be heard in re- 
lation to changes in the Building law, and for a stay 
of proceedings, the proposed changes not being feu- 
tlie good of the greatest number. Keferred to Com- 
mittee on Survey and Inspection of buildings. 

S. 1). Ci'une and forty-two others, for a steam fire 
engine in Ward 11. Keferred to Committee on Fire 
Department. 

RESOLUTIONS. 

Mr. Jones of Ward 14 offered the following resolu- 
tions, which were uminimously passed: 

Resolved, That the thanks of the City Council are 
hereby tendered to Captain Snow and the otlicers and 
men of the Boston Fusileers, Company (}, Third 
Regiment of Infanlry, M. \. M., f(u- promplly volun- 
teering their services and for tlie valuable aid they 
rendered to the police at the fire in Hanover street 
tills day. 

Resolved, That the sympathy of the City Council 
is hereby tendered to the families of those firemen 
and others who lo^t there lives at the fire in Hano\'er 
street this day, and to those who were in.iured in the 
discharge of their diitv, and to the other persons in- 
.iured and their families. 

The last resolution was passed by a rising vote. 

NOMINATION OP ENdlNEEUS OP FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Mr. Marston of Ward 10 moved to talce from the 
table the oixler for the appointment of a committee to 
nominate a Chief and Assistant Engineers of the Fire 
Department. 

Mr. Dean of Ward 12 said the appointment of the 
committee to make the nominations projiosed should 
be delayed for acti(ui on certain reconiniendations re- 
ferred in the report of the Fire Commissioners to the 
Committee on LiMre Department, in relation to the 
nomination of Chief and Assistant Engineers to be 
made by the Mayor and confirmed by tlie City 
Council. It was an important and very excellent 
change, and as the subject was now before a commit- 
tee of the t'ity Government it would not be well to 
false action upon making nominations. Until those 
recommendations were passed uiion or a report was 
made, he hoped the order would not pass, and moved 
that it lie over until the next meeting. 

Mr. Wells of Ward 'A hoped the motion to lay the 
subject over would not prevail, for sixteen members 
of this branch and twelve of the other were just as 
well qualified to make nominations as the Mayor 
could be. With all due respect to the; Mayor, he 
would not take tlie question of making the nomina 
tions from the City C'ouncil. 

Mr. West of Ward Hi said he had no doubt the 
Mayor would be delighted to be relieved of sncli a re- 
sponsibility. 

Mr. Jones of Ward 14 did not think there were any 
such suggestions in the report of the Fire Commis- 
sioners. The committee were in favor of some 
changes in the ordinances hereafter, to take place at 
some future time, by which the Chief and Assistant 
Engineers would be given more power than they have 
now. 

M r. Flynii hoped the matter would not b(^ laid over, 
for lie felt competent to judge for himself as to the 
nominations for engineers. 

Mr. Train of Ward 13 said with due deference to 
the suggestions made for a cliange, the nominations 
should be selected by the members of the several 
wards, who are more competent than others can be 
to judge of the qualifications of the engineers in 
their own secticmw. 

Mr. Dean said that after the Fire Comraission 
had presented a report, and certain recommendations 



had liocn referred to the committee, it is now said 
the Committee on Fire Department will sometime 
jiropose a change in the ordinance, but go on now, 
and commit tliemselves this year beyond the possi- 
bility of changes, which they say may be made at 
some future time. 

Now it would be the strangest thing, so soon after 
the fire, to tuni a deaf ear to' these recommendations 
of the Commissioners, and not try to have any im- 
]u-oveinents made in the Fire Department. The gen- 
tleman from Ward T moved that the report be laid on 
t he table, and, unless he had great leisure, he could 
not have read much of it. lie did not understand 
that it was giving up a prerogative, but it was a rec- 
ommendation to consider wliether ihe appointment 
of a Chief, and lie believed also of Assistant-En- 
gineers, could not be better made in a different way 
than it now is. If he was convinced that it could be, 
he would not object to giving up the prerogative of 
the Council, and would part with the power. There 
was not a member of the board who had the power 
to select independently, for it was always a foregone 
conclusion what the result would be from the meas- 
ures used to secure the nominations. 

He could understand that the members of the Fire 
Department and their friends desire that a change 
should not talie place, and they can make it difficult • 
to take place. They were not sure that there will be 
any change, but the committee should report prompt 
ly, and they should take a careful consideration of 
the subject, as to what shall be for the best interests 
of the city in the long run. It may be best not to ex- 
ercise the power proposed, or in a particular vvayyyet 
there should be no hugging of a prerogative. He 
hoped, therefore, the appointments would be laid 
over, and that the committee would take prompt ac- 
tion, which should prove to be for the best interests 
of the city. 

Mr. Jones said there was no design by the commit- 
tee to cover up anything. He could not say that 
there would be any change proposed in the manner 
of election, but it was believed an amendment would 
be recommended to give the engineers of the Fire De- 
partment more power. As an f)ld member of the 
department, he knew it \vas the feeling that thev did 
not have power enough. The committee would prob- 
ably soon report on the suljject. 

Mr. Dean was of the belief that the mode of elec- 
tion was before the committee as much as anything 
else; and before an election was made there should 
be a report on the subject. 

Mr. Wells of Ward 3 said he believed from what he 
could learn, the Fire Commissioners would be glad to 
get their report back again for tlieir own credit. 
They knew so little about the matter that they did 
not know what was meant by coupling or uncoupling 
hose. 

Mr. Mahan of Ward 5 said he had listened to the 
gentleman from Ward 12 for the purpose of learning 
his duty, whether they should or not postpone action 
on the subject of nominating officers for the Fire De- 
partment, and he failed to sec why the committee 
should not be appointed tonight. They were acting 
under the present ordinance and should act now. 

Mr. Jones, in justice to the Committee on Fire De- 
partment, said it should be stated that they would 
probalily rei)ort on the matter in their hands before 
the Commiltee on Nominations make their report. 

Mr. Dean said the gentleman had said they had 
heard from tlie committee, but it was not so, for the 
hearing from one member was not hearing from the 
committee. The matter was once laid on' the table 
for the purpose of hearing from the committee, and 
there could be no objection to looking into the mat- 
ter. 

Mr. Dacey of Ward 2 believed the gentleman from 
Ward 14 answered all the objections of the gentle- 
man from Ward 12, in the statement that the nomina- 
tions would not probably be reported upon before the 
committee made their report on the suggestions of the 
Commissioners. 

iVir. Dean believed there could be nothing lost by 
delay, and hoped the appointment of a committee 
would not be made tonight. 

Mr. Flynn said it was' true he made tlie motion to . 
lay the report of the Commission on the table, which 
report was laid before the Council on the 3(lth Janu- 
ary, since which time there had been abundant ap- 
portunity to consider the matter. 

Mr. Jones stated that there would be but a month 
before the new board should lie eUicted, failing in 
which the (■iigiiicers would hold over. 

Mr. West oi' Ward 1(i moved as an amendment that 
the comniiltee shall not report on the n(uniiiations 
until tlic icHiimiltee shall report on tlie reixirt of the 
Fire ( 'ominissioners. 

The Chair stated that the motion was not now in 
order, the question being on postpouemenl one 
week. 



COMMON COTJlSrCIL. 



The motion to postpone was lost. 

The question being upon the appointment of the 
committee, Mr. West offered his amendment again. 

The amendment was lost, and the order for the ap- 
pointment of the committee was carried. 

The Chair appointed as the committee on the part 
of the Council— Ward 1, Tower; 2, Dacey; 3, Wells; 
4, Powers; 5, Mahan; 6, Perkins; 7, Plynn; 8, Dar- 



row; 9, Prescott; 10, Marston; 11, Caton; 12, Dean; 
13,- Woodward; 14, Boardniaii; 15, Edwards; 16, Weint. 

Mr. Dean asked to he excused from serving on the 
committee, but the request was not granted. 

On motion of Mr. Page of Ward 9, Messrs. Page, 
Pickering of Ward fi, and Thacher of Ward U> were 
Appointed a committee, to be .ioined, to nominate a 
candidate for Commissioner on the Sinking Fund. 

Adjourned. 



89 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of tlie Board of Alderineii^ 

MARCH a, 1873. 



The regular weekly meetiug of the Board of Alder- 
men was held this afteruoou at four o'clock. Alder- 
man Cutter, the Chairman, presiding. 

JURORS DRAWN. 

Pour Grand Jurors were drawn for the United 
States District Court. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONTIRMED. 

Weigher of Coal and Weigher and Iii.spector of 
Bundle Hay— George A. Soule^ at Wale.* wharf. 

Undertaker — Alonzo T. Baxter. 

Commissioner on Cambridge Bridges — Frederic 
W'. Lincoln. 

Commissioner on Charlestown Bridges — Joseph M. 
Wightman. 

Special Police Officers, without pay — Joseph Til- 
mann, at the German Eoman Catholic Chuirh, Shaw- 
mut avenue; George \V. Blair, at the Old South 
Church ; Joseph Story, at the Bowdoin-sqnare 
Church. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND KEPKURED. 

Henry T. P^agen, for leave to occupy a wooden sta- 
ble for six liorses on K street, near First street. 

Samuel S. Kenney, for leave to build a stable for 
two horses on Saratoga street, corner of Putnam 
street. 

John Day, for leave to occupj' a wooden stable for 
one hoise on Eighth si reel , rear of 8.51 . 

George H. Homer for leave to occupy a wooden sta- 
ble for one horse on Gold sheet, rear of M()7 Pouith 
street. 

Severally refened to the Committee on Health on 
the part of this Board. 

George Atkinson and Moses Williams, Jr., trustees, 
for increase of damages on Washington-street widen- 
ing. 

Potter, White & Bayley. to be paid for extension 
of Franklin street through their leasehold estate Nos. 
56-57 Pearl street. 

Severally referred to Committee on Streets. 

Fearing, Rodman, Swift & Co. and others, for relief 
from the blockaded condition of North and South 
Market streets, caused by wagons, teams, etc. Re- 
ferred to Committees on Market and Licenses. 

Minerva W. Houghton, to be paid for grade dam- 
ages at 493 Tremont street. 

James Parker and others, for change of grade in 
Hawley street. 

Severally referred to Committee on Paving. 

Edward "Lang and others, for the removal of the 
elm tree in St. .lames street, near Regent sireet. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Common, on the part of this 
Board. 

Mary G. Pickering and others, for al)atement of 
assessment for c<mstruction of a drain in Otis place, 
Ward 6. 

S. N. Messer and others, for a sewer in St. James 
street. 

Severally referred to Committee on Sewers. 

Bernard O'Kane, for amendment of certain rules 
and regulations of the Police Department, to provide 
that no dednctions shall be made from pay of officers 
during sickness, aiul that provision be made for them 
to attend their respective places of worship on Sun- 
days. Referred to Commil tee on Police. 

Jacob Rand, for extension of time in which to 
build on East Dedham streel . 

Nathan S. Wilbur, for extension of time in which 
to build on Harrison avenue, corner of SpringfieUl 
street. 

Severally referred to Committee on Public Lands. 

Company B, Ninth Regiment, M. V. M., for in- 
crease of I'ent of armory at 577 Washington street. 
Referred to Committee on Armories. 

Alderman Clark presented a petition from snndry 
citizens of Boston, requesting that all departments 
of the Public Library may be open to the public on 
Sundays. Signed by John G. Loring, James Free- 
man Clarke, "Samnel G. Howe, H. D.Parker. Little, 
Brown & Co., Theodore Metcalf. A. K. Lormg. Jor- 
dan, Marsh & Co., Arthur Cheney. Otis Rich, James 
T. Fields, Crosby, Morse & Foss,' Charles G. Greene, 
Francis H. Underwood, George H. Chickering, Henry 
C. Badger, H. G. Otis, Patrick Donahoe, Edward E. 
Hale, Rufus Ellis, George E. Ellis, Daniel N. Haskell, 
P. S. Gilmore, and others. Referred to Committee on 
Public Library. 



RtOSiriNATION OP OFFICE. 

A communication was received fi'cmi John H. Cook, 
resigning his olKce as Cleric of Ward 11, under the 
order of the President of the Uniled States by which 
persons in Ihc employment of the GeiU'ral (iovern- 
ment are (lis(|iialili<(l from holding State or munici- 
pal oitices. Orderi-d to be placed on file. 

ANNIIAI, REPORT OP COMMISSIONERS OP CEDAR GKOVE 
CISMETERY. 

The lifth auiuial report of the Commissioi\er8 of 
Cedar (irove Cemetery states that the si'rvices of F. 
M. Safford were .secured as Snperinlendent on the 
first of May last, and he has performed the duties of 
the otlice to the satisfaction of the Connnissioners 
and the acceptance of Hiosc having relations with the 
cemetery. The work during the year embraces the 
raising and giadiug of a i)art of Linden avenue, 
changnig the location of another part of the same 
avenue, and of a parr of Cedar avenue and the grad- 
ing of the same: the grading in pait of the large tract 
of land lying bel wi'cn Ihesc two avenncK; the prepar- 
ation of I he oiiiamental sjiaces I'or planis and shrnb- 
bery; Ihe planling of Irees, i)lants and shrubs, and 
other woik of clearing the ground. 

Twenty-five of the lots previously sold have been 
newly graded and sodded at the expense of the pro- 
prietors; twenly lots were sold and twenty-si.x were 
graded in lS7-.i, .-ind the nnmlier of inlennents was 
forty. A pnblic lot large enough to afford room for 
one thousand single graves has been laid oui in an 
eligible location on Maple avenue, the grading of 
which will be ciu'ried on as occasion may demand. 
Under Ihe authority to expend $(il)00 in improving 
the gi'(unids, the e.Kpeiidilnres have amounted to 
f51.5(;b), of which ^^A'.K (15 was to Superintendent 
anil laborers, |511 4H for horses, carts, etc.. .^278 'JO 
for plants, trees and seeds, pi'.ii 51 for manure and 
loam, ^:200 to (4erk, $188 for tools, flM) for posts, . 
$ll:> 118 for |)rinling, engineering, removal of bodies, 
etc. Since the last ainnnd leport the Shawniut 
Brainh Railroad <'on)|iany has completed its track 
through a part of Ihe eenietei'y grounds, .-nid is run- 
ning its cars, but the railroad "oinpany has yet con- 
siderable work to do in the grounds to place them 
and the crossings of the avenues by its track in the 
condition riMjuired by law. 

Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 

IINFINISIIED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were severally read a second 
time and passed: 

Order to allow Company K, Ninth Infantry, $70 70, 
for repaiis on their armory on 'I'hird and Dorchester 
streets. 

Order to allow Company .^, Ninth Infantry, fliOO 
per annum for rent of .armoiv at the corner of Cause- 
way and Lowell streets, tron'i Feb. 1, ]87;l 

Order to .-dlow Company A. Ninth Infantry, $;M0, 
for repairs and furniture of armory. 

Order to pay Sidney B. Morse $.5fiOO, for land taken 
on Bedford streel. 

Order to pay Henry Willis $2985, for land taken on 
Purchase sti'eet. 

Order to i)ay William F.Weld $19,520, for land taken 
on Devonshiie street. 

Order to pay heirs of E. H. Robbins. $2.5t), for land 
taken on Sturgis street. 

P.\PEHS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

The petitions of S. D. Crane and others and of Wil- 
liam H. Blue and others, were referred, in concur- 
rence. 

The order for the apiiointment of a joint commit- 
tee to nominate a Commissioner on Sinking Funds. 
was concurred in, and .Vldei-men Gibson and Clark 
were joined to the committee. 

The apjioinhnent of one member of the Common 
Council from each ward, with such a.s the Board of 
Aldermen may join, as a conimittee to nominate a 
Chief and Assistant Engineers of the Fn-e Depart- 
ment, was concurred in, and the whole Board of Al- 
deimeii were joined to the ccmimittee. 

Tlie following votes were passed, in concurrence: 

Resolutions of sympathy with families of firemen 
killi-d or injured at the recent fire on Hanover street. 

A'ote of thanks to Boston Fusileers for military as- 
sistance rendered at the scene of the said fire. 

PIKST ASSISTANT-.iSSESSOR. 

The election of Artemas R. Holden as a First As- 
sistant-Assessor in place of James Dennie. chosen 
by the Board, came up, when the Board proceeded 
to an election with the following result: 

Whole nninber uf votes 13 

Necessary to a choice 7 

James Deunie had 9 

Artemas E. Holden 3 

Mr. Dennie was again declared to be elected, in 
nonconcurrence. 



M A I^ C H 



1873 



90 



RKPORTS OF COMMTTTEES. 

Aklcriiiiiii Sayward, from the Coininittec on Health, 
repoited tlial leave he granted to Thomas (". Pipev to 
oecupj' a ivooden stahle for (wo horses on West f'ot- 
ta-^'e street, ])roYided said stahle shall he located on 
the soiilhwesteily eonier of said lol. Aceepled. 

Ahleiinaii Culler, from the ( 'oiiiiniltee on Paviiig. 
to whom was recommilteed the ordei' of iiotiee rela 
live to the revoeaticm of the location of the Metro- 
politan Uailroad on W'alnul avenue, and petitious in 
favor of said revocation, made a report reeonimend- 
injj; tl>e passage of an (M'der revoking the right grant- 
ed to the Metropolitan Kailroad Company by the city 
of Eoxbury Novemher T, 1855, to lay a single track 
over Walnut street (now Walnut avenue), from the 
corner of Warren street to West Roxbiiry line. Read 
once. 

Alderman Cutter, from the Committee on Paving, 
reported leave to withdraw on the several petitions of 
Leauder H. Jones and others, that a street, in contin- 
uation of Foundry street be called Alfred street; 
William Hayes, to be paid for grade damages on Alav- 
erick street'; James J. Hogan,"to he paid for grade 
damages on H street, near Second street; and no 
action necessary on the several petitions of Maria 
D. Lockwood. to be paid for grade damages on Dorr 
street; Ebeu Jackson, to be compensatecl for grade 
damages in Broadway; and P. W. G. May, to be paid 
for grade damages on Dorchester avenue. Severally 
accepted. 

Alderman Sayward, from the Joint Standing Com- 
mittee on Public Buildings, to whom was referred the 
accompanying offer from the First Bapti.st Society, of 
apartments in their church for city oflices, macle a 
report that they have visited the premises and find 
they are not suitable for the use required by the city. 
They would therefore report inexpedient. Accepted. 

Alderman Clark, from the Committee on Streets, 
made a report on sundry petitions for apportionment 
of betterments on sundry estates on Harrison avenue, 
with an order for the apportionment into tlnee equal 
parts of the assessments upon Joseph Nickerson, Jo- 
seph GrifHn, Michael Connors, Canterbury Litchfield, 
Henry B. Chamberlin, John F. Newton, four es- 
tates; Henry Kelley, Mehitable Curtis, Daniel A. 
Sigourney, two estates; Hoi-atio G. Morse, three es- 
tates; heirs of Peter Goodnow, Caleb Dyce. 

The report was accepted and the orders were 
passed. 

Alderman Sayward, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of licenses as follows: J. 
Graham and others , to give a concert at Wait's Hal), 
March 5; W. S. Pike, to give entertainments of magic 
at East Boston, South P».ston, etc. ; T. H. Dunn, to 
deliver a course of lectures at the Meionaon; toR. H. 
Spalding, as an auctioneer; to fourteen newsboys; to 
certain persons as victuallers, a pawnbroker, wagon 
licenses, transfer of wagon license, to keep an intel- 
ligence office, for hack stand, dealers in second-hand 
articles. Accepted. 

The same committee reported leave to withdraw 
on petition of Flint Peaslee, for leave to sell candies 
in Bowdoin square. Acceptec. 

Alderman Gaffield, from the Joint Standing Com- 
mittee on Public Instruction, to whom was referred 
the order of the School Committee requesting the 
City Council to furnish additional accommodations 
for primary scholars in East Boston, made a report, 
recommending the passage of the accompanying or- 
der: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authoi'ized to procure plans and estimates for 
the erection of primary schoolhouses on land owned 
by the city in the Prescott and Chapman school dis- 
tricts in East Boston, said plans to be approved by 
the Committee on Public Instruction, and the ex- 
pense of procuring the same charged to the appro- 
priation for Public" Buildings. 

The report was accepted, and the order was passed. 

Alderman Quincy, from the Committee on Or- 
dinances, who were requested to report an ordinance 
providing that the Port Physician shall be the 
physician or assistant-physician, as t-he Board of Di- 
rectors for Public Institutions may elect, of all the 
city establishments which are or may be located at 
Deer Island, made a report recommending the pas- 
sage of the accompanying ordinance: 

Ordinance to amend an ordinance relating to the 
public health. 

Section 1. The ordinance relating to the Public 
Health passed the second day of December, 1872, is 
hereby amended by striking out Ihe twenty-tifth sec- 
tion and inserting in place thereof the following: 

Sect. 25. The Port Physician shall reside at Deer 
Island. He shall be superintendent and physician of 
the quarantine establishment at Deer Island, and 
either physician or assistant-physician, as the Board 
of Directors for Public lustitutions may elect, of all 



the city establishments which arc or may be located 
upon said island. He shall |)erform all sncii services 
as may be rc(|uired of liim by the Mayor or the Board 
of Health in relation to (iiiaiantine. 

The report was accepted and tlie ordinance was 
passed. 

SECOND ASSISTANT-ASSESSORS. 

Alderman Brown, from the Committee (ui Assess- 
ors' Department, made a report recommending the 
following named persons for Second Assistant As- 
sessors : 

Ward 1 (2 districts)— John Noble, Daniel J. 
Sweeney. 

Ward 2 (2 districts) — George W. Close, Dennis 
Cawley, Jr. 
W'ard S (1 district)— Charles H. Boardman. 
Ward 4 (2 districts) — Martiu Dowling, William S. 
Whitney. 

Ward 5 (2 districts)— Roger H. Scanuell, Daniel J. 
Courtney. 
Ward G (1 district) — Emerson Coolidge. 
Ward '? (2 districts)— Dudley Pray, Jeremiah Sul- 
livan. 
Ward 8 (1 district)— M. H. Enwright. 
Ward 9 (2 districts)— Francis R. Stoddard, James 
Standish. 
Ward 10 (1 district)— Charles B. Hunting. 
Ward 11 (1 district)— George W. Skinner. 
Ward 12 (2 districts)— Thomas Leavitt, Joseph R. 
Grose. 
Ward Vi (1 district) Edward W. Dolan. 
Ward 14 (2 districts)— Elbridge G. Scott, William 
H. Mcintosh. 

Ward 15 (2 districts)— Henry A. Drake, B. F. S. 
Bullard. 

Ward 16 (3 districts)— John Pierce, E. H. R. Rug- 
gles, George W. Conant 

The report was accepted, when the Board proceed- 
ed to an election, the re.sult of the ballot being as 
follows : 

Whole number of votes 13 

Necessai'v to a choice 7 

Ward l—Two Districts. 

John Noble 12 

Daniel J. Sweeney 12 

Ward2—Two Districts. 

George W. Close 12 

Dennis Cawley, Jr 12 

Ward o—One District. 

Charles H. Boardman 6 

E. W. James 3 

Artemas K. Holden.: 2 

Joseph Allen 1 

M'ardi — Two Districts. 

Martin Dowling 12 

William S. Whitney 12 

Ward 5— Two Districts. 

Roger H. Scannell 11 

John J. Gallivan 11 

John Donnelly 2 

Ward d—One District. 

John T. Prince 9 

Emerson Coolidge 3 

Ward 'i—Two Districts. 

Dudley Pray 11 

Jeremiah Sullivan 12 

James H. Magner 1 

Ward 8— One District. 

Ira D. Davenport 9 

M. H. Enwright 3 

Ward 'i—Two Districts. 

Francis E. Stoddard 12 

James Standish 12 

Ward 10— One District. 

Charles B.Hun ting 12 

Ward n—One District. 

George W. Skinner 12 

Waj'd n—Two Districts. 

Thoma.s Leavitt 12 

Joseph R. Grose 12 

Ward 13— One District. 

Edward W. Dolan 12 

Ward li—Two Districts. 

Elbridge G. Scott 12 

William H. Mcintosh 12 

Ward 15— Two Districts. 

Henry A. Drake 11 

B. F. S. Bullard 9 

Edward Kelley 5 

James H. Morrow 1 

Wat'd 16— Three Districts. 

John Pierce 12 

E. H. E. Ruggles 12 

George W. Conant 9 

Oliver Hall S 

By the returns it appears that there was a choice in 
aH the wards except Ward 3. 



91 



BOARI3 OF ALDERMEN. 



On the secoiid ballot tUo result in Ward 3 was as 
follows: 

Whole uunilier of votes 1^ 

Necessary to a clioicC' /? 

Joseph Allen li 

Charles H. Boardman J 

E. W. James 1 

Ai'temas R. Hoklen 1 

The third ballot resulted as follows: 

Whole number of votes I'-' 

. Necessary to a choice 1 

Joseph Allen i> 

Charles H. Boardman 3 

Mr. Allen was declared to be elected. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins — 

Ordered, That in addition to the amount of $26,000 
allowed for clerk hire in the Assessors" Department, 
in the salary order of the (!ity Council of 1872, a 
further sum of $1000 be allowed for that purpose, for 
payment of clerk hire in that department during the 
present salary year, ending March 31, 187-2; said sum 
to be chai'ged to the approjjriation for Salaries. 

On motion of Alderman (.'lark — 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be di- 
rected to take such measures as the Committee on 
Paving may from time to time deem expedient to 
keep the streets on the burnt district clear from ob- 
structions and safe for public travel; the expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation for the 
Burnt District. 

On motion of Alderman Sayward — 

Ordered, That the Committee on Paving report to 
this Board a series of rules to govern the persons 
authorized under section 41 of the ordinance on 
streets, to sprinkle the streets of this city. 

ORDERS OP NOTICE. 

On petition of N. C. Munson, for leave to cross a 
portion of Yarmouth street with a rail track. Hear- 
ing, Monday, March 24, 4 P. M. 

On petition of the Howard Watch Company, for 
leave to locate a steam engine and boiler on Eustis 
street, at the corner of Prcscott street. Hearing, 
Monday, March 24, 4 P. M. 

ORDERS READ ONCE. 

On motion of Alderman Clark — 

Orders to pay Jolui Foster $387.5, for land taken to 
widen Bedford street; to pay Caleb Stetson and Sam- 
uel Atherton !|1;2577, for land taken to widen Purchase 
street; to pay H. Hollis Hnnnewell $S(I21, for land 
taken to widen Devonshire street; to pay J. Henry 
Sears $786 90, for land taken to widen Cottage street. 

On motion of Alderman Power, that the street 
leading from Fourth street opposite Foundry street, 
and extending to Dorchester avenue near Sixth 
street, a portion of which has heretofore been called 
Foundry street and a portion Sixth street, be called 
and known as Foundry street. 

On motion of Alderman Quincy, an order to re- 
scind an order of April 12, 1872. making an allowance 
of $400 per annum for rent of armory of Company A, 
Ninth Regiment, on Hanover street, 

PAYMENT OF CLAIMS FOR WORK ON SMALLPOX HOS- 
PITAL. 

On motion of Alderman Sayward, the report "leave 
to withdraw" on petition of Holohan A: JMaguire to 
be paid for plumbing work on Smallpox Hospital 
destroyed by lire, was taken from the table, and con- 
sidered. 

Alderman Sayward ofEered an order as a substitute 
for the report, "to pay the parties $1024 for work done 
on said hospital. 

Alderman Gaffield stated as the grounds for the 
report, that the opinion of the City Solicitor was ob- 
tained, that as the work under the contract was not 
accepted, it would not be legal to pay for it, and, ad- 
mitting it to be a hard case, as they were not called 
upon to exercise charity, the committee could not 
report in favor of the payment of the claim. 

Alderman Sayward did not agree with the commit- 
tee in their conclusions, for he believed the contract 
to be virtually completed, there being but three or 
four extra hours" work to be done; and it would be a 
species of robbei'y not to pay them for their work. 
If the contract was fulfilled, the city ought to pay 
them. 

Alderman Quincy stated as the difference, that if 
the contract was nearly completed it was not fully, 
and it was a question whether they had a right to 
pay for work not delivered, simply because it was a 
hard case. He heartily sympathized with the par- 
ties, but they were not there to exercise pity, and 
should not vote for the order if it was illegal, as they 
were assured it was by the City Solicitor. "^ 

In answer to a question of Alderman Stebbins, he 
said the work was not at the time the city's, but to 



be delivered, and was at the risk of the builders. If 
completed and accepted, the city would have been 
liable; but at the time the building was owned by 
the contractors, and it was at their risk. 

Alderman Sayward declared that they did deliver 
their work to the city on their grounds, and on the 
sec(md contiact, after the fire, what was picked up 
as the remains of the fire were accepted by the city. 
If the contract was not admitted to be completed,why 
did the city accept the materials saved from the fire? 
Alderman Clark believed there could be no doubt 
there was an equitable claim. The circumstances of 
the case were pecuiiai-, and was for work in plumb- 
ing, not like that of a schoolhouse or engine house, 
to be completed and delivered. It was so far com- 
pleted that orders bad been given to put in the fur- 
niture the night on which it was burnt. All the 
work would have been completed if it had been 
thought necessary to use lights. Inasmuch as the 
city had given orders to its agents to put in furnit- 
ure, and it would have been done but for the storm 
on the night of the fire, and furthermore as it was in 
the charge of the city's agents, as watchmen, it might 
have been set on fire through the carelessness of 
these agents, it should be considered as a virtual ac- 
ceptance of the work, and an equitable claim for pay- 
ment. 

A precedent for the payment of this claim could 
be found in the case of Rockwell & Churchill, city 
printers, for work destroyed in their office during the 
great fire. In that case the City Solicitor believed the 
payment was not legal, yet considered it an equitable 
claim. Here was a case of mechanics suffering for 
the sum of $1000 or $1100 because they did not work 
till twelve o'clock to complete their work. If not 
legal it was an equitable claim, and it would be com- 
plete robbery and the greatest injustice not to pay 
every dollar of it. Inasmuch as the city did accept 
the old material, and it was deducted from the other, 
he had no doubt they could collect the claim legally. 
Why recognize the ownership of the material if not 
pay the claim for the work? 

Alderman Gibson inquired if the building was not 
insured by the parties, and if not, it was not the con- 
cern or loss of the city. 

Alderman Gaffield replied that there was no insur- 
ance on this work. 

Alderman Gibson wished to know then why the 
case was here when the city was full of insurance 
ofhces, ready to insure such property, and if it was 
not their lookout to get it insured it was not the city's 
fault. They paid a City Solicitor $10,000 for his opin- 
ion, and they should regard his opinion, or start him 
off. He pitied the men, but there was no reason why 
they should be paid a cent. 

Alderman Clark did not believe there was oiie 
plumber in a thousand who got an insurance on his 
work, and they could not afford to pay in such a case. 
It was a case of equity if not of law, and it was no 
more than .iustice that it should be paid. The cost 
of the building would be cheap enough with the 
payment of all the bills, and when improvements are 
made and additions made to it it will answer the 
purpose for which it was designed for many years 
to come. As to the salary of the City Solicitor, they 
did not pay him $10,000 but $5000. 

Alderman Sayward expressed a doubt whether the 
parties could have got an insurance. 

Alderman Gibson believed they were derelict of 
their duty if they did not, and it was none of the 
business of the city if they did not. In the face of 
the opinion of the City Solicitor, and he did not mean 
that he was paid $10,000, but that the office cost that 
sum, they ought not to pay that claim. It was the 
fault of the parties if they did not get insured. He 
could not see that it was a hard case, for if they had 
intended to bear the loss they would have got in- 
sured. 

Alderman Sayward replied that the parties agreed 
to do certain work and they had done it. The only 
contract they had was a verbal one, and as they were 
honest they acknowledged that they made such a con- 
tract, when they might have put in their work by the 
day, and got their pay for it. 

Alderman Clark referred to the case of the Girls' 
High and Normal School, as a precedent, in which 
the city paid for work destroyed by a gale of wind. 
In that case the contractors could have afforded the 
loss, while in this case the contractors could not. 

Alderman Gibson said it was news to him if the 
city was to be a gale, fire and accident insurance 
company. 

Alderman Sayward referred again to the fact that 
the contract was a verbal one, and that the parties 
might, if they had so chosen, put in a bill for their 
work by the day. There was a moral if not a legal 
obligation to pay the bUl. 

Alderman Gibson held the verbal contract to be as 
strong as a written one, and if the parties failed to 



MAnOH 3, 1873. 



92 



!i(^t. insiuvd, Hioy could not. conu! upon tlie cily for 
tlieir piiy. 'I'hcy coukl liiive gc't insured at Iwoiit.y- 
tive cents a nioiiMi upon $100. He did know of iii- 
snnmce c()niiijini<'S Unit wi'ilc on Ijuildinijs blown 
ilovvn, and the city had nothinsi' to do with thenogU^ct 
of others. 

Aldirnian (Juincy said the Committee on Claims 
were clear that the city was not liahU^ for the pay- 
ment of this claim, and if paid as a i)i'ece(leiit, what 
would followy In the cases of the blou iny-iip of 
buildings at the lire, they believed the city was not 
liable, and so reported, and there was no reason for it 
in these cases, so there was none in this. If it was to 
be paid it should be taken on the shoulders of the 
Boaid, and not on tl:ose of the committee. 

Aldei'man Sayward stated that the city received all 
the contractorsagreed to give it in work. 

Alderman Gafheld believed the payment of such a 
claim would open the door to a multitude of claims. 
The City Solicitor says it should not be paid, and 
that shonld be reason enough. In a recent case be- 
fore the committee, the party being asked his amount 
of claim, replied $3000; yet the committee reported 
leave to withdraw, because it would open the door to 
other illegal claims. If every unfortunate person 
who suiters by lire and accidents and comes to the city 
because his case is a hard one, to pay them all would 
make the city bankrupt. He was willing to use his 
purse so far as might be necessary to meetJiard cases, 
but could not vote to take the money of the city. 

The committee reported leave to withdraw in this 
case, because they did not believe the parties fulfilled 
their contract, yet the Alderman now says they might 
have brought in their bill for days' works. He did 
not believe in doing business in that way. It was in 
evidence when the building was burnt that when it 
was asked how much the lire would cost the city, the 
reply was not a dollar. The city was not liable for the 
work until it was delivered, and it was not in a condi- 
tion to be delivered up. 

Alderman Power said the payment of claims for 
accidents was not to be compared with this. Birt in 
the comparison as to the payment for broken arms 
and legs, is it an uncommon thing to continue to pay 
the wages of those in the employ of the city, who 
meet with such accidents? As in the case advocat- 
ed by him for the payment of the claim of Rockwell 
&. Churchill, he was in favor of this, and did not like 
to have the city take advantage of a legal quibble to 
cheat a poor man out of a few^ dollars under such cir- 
cumstances as this. There was not a voter in the 
city who would object to the payment. Rockwell & 
Churchill had not a legal claim, but in .iustice it was 
believed the claim should be paid. 

If these parties should now make out a bill for 
their days' work, they could not refuse to pay it. As 
to getting insurance on their work, he never heard of 
a mechanic doing such a thing under such circum- 
stances in his life. There were precedents for the 
payment, and in justice they ought to pay it. and 
should there he more claimsj and there was noth- 
ing worse than this, no citizen would find fault for 
so doing. 

Alderman Gibson said he had never heard of any 
mechanic not getting an insurance in such cases ; it 
was their duty to do it, and if they did not they 
should get nothing. The city was not a hurricane, 
fire or accident insurance company. There was no 
money due, and he considered it a put-up job to get 
their sympathy. The city had a lai'ge pocket, and 
long-armed men liked to get their hands down deep 
in that pocket. He movecl the previous question, but 
withdrew it on request. 

Alderman Clark denied that this was a put-up job. 
He had no doubt if the City Solicitor was familiar 
with all the facts in the case that he would agree that 
the city had virtually accepted the work, for they 
were putting in bedsteads, bedding and other articles 
that day. As they were putting in these things it was 
just as likely that our agents set the building on fire. 
He doubted whether the Solicitor knew it was virtu- 
ally accepted, by putting in supplies and provisions. 
In justice and equity, to the city and to the citizens, 
this was a fair case to be settled hy paying it. 

Alderman Gibson said the contract was not com- 
pleted, and the claim should not come here. Otlices 
were open to them for insurance, but they failed to 
get it, and ought not to come here for their pay. The 
work might be said to be well along, but it was not 
done. 

Alderman Clark said the work was virtually ac- 
cepted, and orders were given to occupy the building 
that day. If not accepted, then it was not right in 
the city to occupy the building. He doubted whether 
the Solicitor woiild have given Ihe legal opinion he 
did if he had known all the facts. But for the storm, 
furniture would have been placed in the building 
during the afternoon and evening, and an allowance 
had been made for the materials saved from the fire. 



Aldc^i'man Brown, in view of the difference of opin- 
ion, and fof tlie jinipose of ascerl .-lining whether the 
City Solicilor knew all the facts in the case, moved 
that the subject he laid over one week, but withdrew 
the motion. 

Alderman Gibson said if it was understood the 
work was compleled he would vole to pay for it. 

Aldernum Say ward replied that the work lacked an 
hour or two of completion. He could not understand 
what was meant by the Alderman's saying it was a 
pnt-np job, unless Ihe teiin api)lied to buying old 
steamboats, '^riie work was i)ut up in a building of 
the city, and lie belie\i'd it to Ix' a legal claim. 

Alderman Ciuiney stated I hat all the evidence in the 
case was before the City Solicitor, as to moving in 
articles. On the statement of the Alderman the con- 
tract was made with a mental proviso, that if not 
paid, it was to be charged as days' work. He had no 
right to say so. 

Alderman Sayward said he did not say that the par- 
ties claimed a right to charge for days' work. The ver 
bal contractwas held to be just as binding as a written 
one, and the parties meant to do right and acknowl- 
edged the contract. But it was believed that that 
was the cheapest way of doing the labor by days' 
work, and the Chairman of the Board asked why it 
was not done so. 

Alderman Gibson inquired whether the Alderman 
considered the work to be done according to con- 
tract y 

Alderman Sayward replied that the contract was a 
verbal one, for $1*10. He knew nothing of the words 
of the contract, but knew that it was all done but an 
hour's work, and this might have been on account of 
extra work. 

Mr. Stebbins wished to know of the superintend- 
ent of the work, who was present, whether the stoves 
put into the building were not put there by the city. 

M. F.Wells, by request of the Board,' stated in 
answer to questions, that the stoves were put in and 
run hy the city, and the w'ork was all done except in 
making connections with the boilers. It might have 
been done except for extra work. Beds, bedsteads, 
coal hods, etc., had been put in. 

Alderman Stebbins contended that on these state- 
ments the work had been virtually accepted, and the 
city was legally bound to pay for it. 

Alderman Gaffield said the statements in relation 
to the know ledge of the City Solicitor touched him. 
His sympathies were all in favor of the parties, and 
all the evidence which was reported was submitted 
by him to the City Solicitor. He got the evidence, 
and again and a^ain went to the City Solicitor with 
its details, told him all about the Superintendent's 
services, and the supplies, etc. But on this point ex- 
Alderman Jenks testified that the supplies were to be 
sent the next day, and were so ordered. Yet this 
did not alter the legal liability, in the opinion of the 
City Solicitor, unless the contractors protested 
against putting in the articles. 

Alderman Brown renewed his motion to recommit 
to ascertain whether the City Solicitor knew all the 
facts, and if so whether it was a legal claim. 

The motion was lost — 5 to 6. 

Alderman Clark, to relieve doubts as to the ques- 
tion of acceptance, stated that certain kinds of goods 
were ordered to the hospital to the amount of $200 or 
$300, under direction of the employes, and would 
have been there but for the storm. On account of 
the storm they were stored on the way. But a cer- 
tain lot to the amount of $100 was delivered. The 
work was virtually accepted, for the city had its own 
stoves, coal and the care of the building when burnt. 

Alderman Quincy stated that the work could not 
be accepted before delivered. The next day the keys 
were to be delivered, when the acceptance would 
have taken place. 

Alderman Sayward wished to know how it could be 
learned what was the language of the contract when 
it was not written. 

Alderman Gibson was sorry the motion to recom- 
mit did not prevail. There appeared to be a disposi- 
tion to choke off obtaining the opinion of the City 
Solicitor on the full facts in the case. They were 
guardians of the city's property, and .should look 
over matters to see that no illegal payments were 
made. 

Alderman Sayward said he knew something of the 
work. There- were' stoves in the building piit in by 
the city, but he never heard of stoves being put in to 
dry plumber's work. 

Alderman Gib.son reported that there was no claim, 
for the job was not done. It appeared to be only a 
put-up job. If one or two hours' more work was're- 
quired, it was not complete, and there was nothing 
here for us. It had no business here, and there was 
nothing to pay for. He moved the previous question 
and the yeas and nays on the motion. 

The order was lost by a vote of six to six, as follows: 



93 



BOARD OF ALDEE.MElSr 



Yeas — Brown, Clark, Emery, Power, Sayward, 
Stebbins. 

Nays— Bigelow, Clatter, Ga.ffielcl, Cxihson, Hulbert, 
Qitincy. 

The question reenrred upon the acceptance of the 
report, leave to withdraw. 

Alderman Ilulbert said he was going to move a re- 
committal, for no one wishes injustice done in any- 
thing. Every member of the Board desired to do 
right, and if the payment was to be made it must be 
made in accordance with the authority for doing it. 
It should be submitted to the City Solicitor, who is 
bound to know the legality of the measure. He 
should be glad to know that he was acquainted with 
all the facts, and if, after they were all stated, he 
should give a like decision, he should vote in accord- 
ance with that opinion. That it may be fully un- 
derstood by the City Solicitor, he hoped it would be 
recommitted to the committee to report again ui)onit. 

Alderman Quincy said he would vote for recommit- 
ting if there were more facts to be reported upon. 
There had been nothing said here that had not been 
told to the City Solicitor. He conld not see any ne- 
cessity for recommitting, and could not vote for it. 

Alderman Gibson would not pav the claim if not 
due, and the difference of opinion, (i to (i. called for 
another investigation. 

Alderman Gafiield had no ob.iection to the recom- 
mitment, yet all of the evidence had been given to 
the City Solicitor. The question was put to him rel- 
ative to the goods being sent to the hospital, and he 
replied that it made no difference at all, if there was 
no protest. 

The motion to recommit was carried. 

On motion of Alderman Sayward, the report 'leave 
to withdraw"' on petition of Stnitli & McGarragle to 
be paid the amount of their contract for erection of 
the Smallpox Hospital which was destroyed by fire, 
was taken from the table. 

Alderman Sayward asked for the reasons for the 
conclusion of the report. 

Alderman Cutter (Alderman Gibson in the chair) 
addressed the Board in defence of the report of the 
committee. He said there were a large number of 
witnesses before the committee, and everybody who 
knew anything of the matter was summoned. The 
report of the evidence was then sent to the City So- 
licitor, who gave it as his opinion that the claini was 
an illegal one, and it was their duty to report that it 
should not be paid. He would ne\ er report an ille- 
gal bill for payment if not required to. The powers 
of the city were created by charter, and they were 
not to vote away money in charity. By virtue of law 
money was raised and by virtue of law it was ex- 
pended. Most of the claims which are made against 
the city are illegal, and if the parties think .instice is 
not done them, they have their leinedy in the courts. 

He was surprised lliat this cl,-iim was advocated 
here, for all there was of it was sympathy, and they 
had nothing to do with it. In corroboration of his 
views he would cite from the opinious of the Mayor, 
while a member of this Board in 1871. The views of 
the Mayor were given in the House of Correction 
cases, in which a distinction was made between that 
of Freeland, Beard & Co., wlio re<|nired a receipt for 
all the goods delivered by them, and those of other 
parties who did not. In that Aklernian Pierce argued 
that the City Council must act within its corporate 
powers. 

Alderman Clark wished the Alderman would read 
the argument on both sides in those cases. 

Alderman Cuttei- said he wished to give the opin- 
ion of the present Mayor, which was that they were 
debarred the payment of illegal claims. So far as 
related to the furnishing of stoves in this case, they 
were for the convenience of builders as mneh as they 
were for the city. The contract was to be completed 
the next day, when the building was to be delivered 
at noon. It was in evidence ttiat the last thing they 
did at night nas to look after the stoves, and in less 
than half an hour after they left it was burned. The 
next morning, in answer to his question, the Aldei- 
man in charge of the work, said the city had not lost 
a dollar. He replied that if the city was not holden 
he liad nothing to say. If holden, he would have 
asked for an investigation. AA'hen this present con- 
tract was made, it was not given to the lowest bidder, 
for the reason, it was said, that the city did not own 
the piling. If the building had been accepted, then 
the city would have owned the piling. 

Alderman Sayward said, 1 call this report from the 
table at this time for the purpose of asking the com- 
mittee vvhat are the reasons for giving these petition- 
ers leave to withdraw. While I believe we have an 
able and discreet .judge in our City Solicitor on all 
legal questions, still he is human and liable to err. 
Now he says these parties have no legal claim for'the 
labor and materials furnished to the city of Boston 
in building the smallpox hospital on Swett street, 



which was destroyed by fu'e on the night of the 26th 
of December, ISTi. Now this may be so, but 1 think 
all will admit that they have a claim in equity. Now, 
sir, as to t,he legality of this claim, 1 have so much 
contldeiice in this that were it my own case and I 
conld not gel my claim allowed here I thould ask for 
a .iui'y to decide it. 

I think these parties have a legal claim, and I will 
endeavor to give my reasons for this, so that the 
members of tliis Board will see it in the same light in 
which 1 do. In the lirsl, place let us see what the con- 
tract says, and 1 will merely glance at some of its pro- 
visions. It provides for insurance when the roof ia on 
and the policy be made payable to the city of Boston. 
Why this precaution on the part of the city/ Does the 
city by the terms of this contract agree to pay at this 
time? or is there any evidence that the contractors 
made a demand for money at this time, and that this 
was the reason the city desired to be insured V No, sir ! 
the city knew that wlien the roof was ou thia build- 
ing, whatever labor and materials had been put into 
that building the city were bound to pay for, hence 
the request to insure. If this is not so, and it was 
the contractors' loss, in case of fire or any other ca- 
lamity, what right has the city of Boston to say when 
or how much insurance shall be effected on this 
building? Another provision in this contract is, that 
this smallpox hospital is to be completed on or be- 
fore the -iHth of December. 1872. These parties claim 
that it was completed the day before it was destroyed 
by tire. If this was the case, have they not fulfilled 
their contract? It may be said they had not deliv- 
ered it to the city. Is there an.y clause in the con- 
tract requiring them to make any formal delivery of 
this building to the city? But suppose there was 
such a clause. The city did not wait for such a no- 
tice, but took possession by placing furniture in the 
building, causing fires to be made, and placing watch- 
men there to tend fires, and I think firemen and po- 
lice to guard the building. 

But if what I have already said should fail to con- 
vince members of this Board that the contractors 
should be paid for the labor and materials furnished 
to the city for this hospital— for no one denies that 
the materials were furnished, and the labor per- 
formed—the only question is will the city pay 
for this? In the absence of a contract, these 
parties would get their pay. Now there is a 
contract, and that contract having been fulfilled 
on the i)art of the contractors, by completing the 
buildins on or before the 28th of December, 1872, the 
city of Boston is bound to pay the amount agreed 
upon. But, as I said before, if I have failed to con- 
vince this Board thus far, there are still other rea- 
sons. 

The first is, that the party who superintended the 
building of this hospital for the city of Boston has 
been paid in full for his services, namely, by the 
usual percentage for plans, specifications and super- 
intendence on the full cost of the building. If 
this is not proof that the city accepted this building, 
what other pioof is wanted? 

I presume it will not be denied that if the city 
owned any porti(5u or part of this building, it owned 
the whole. To show that it did claim to own the 
part that was not destroyed by fire, in asking for 
proposats the parties were told that the foundation 
was there and need not be included in the bids. Was 
this not saying the city owned this building? Then 
I ask why should we, as agents for the city, refuse to 
pay this claim? 

I ha\e but few words more to say on the subjec, 
and then shall leave the matter with the Board, hop- 
ing that they will believe with me that they are both 
legally and morally bound to pay these petitioners. 
If these parties had not fulfilled their contract at the 
time of the tire why did not the city insist that they 
should, instead of making a new contract? It may 
be said in answer that there was not time. Under 
the circumstances the time could have been extend- 
ed and a compromise have been made with the con- 
tractors to put up such a building as we now have, in 
place of the one they had previously contracted for. 
But everything that has been done on the part of the 
city goes to show that it was considered that this 
smallpox hospital that was destroyed by fire must be 
paid for. 

Alderman Cutter said they had but to discharge 
their duty in the refusal to pay an illegal claim, and 
take the consequences. 

Alderman Sayward replied that that was what he 
proposed to do, to discharge his duty, and he did not 
wish that any one should call his vote in question. 

Alderman Quincy referred to the clause in the con- 
tract in relation "to insurance as an acknowledg- 
ment of liability of contractors when the roof was 
on. 

Alderman Sayward explained that it had reference 
to the time when it was to be insured, and not when 



M A I^ O H 



1873. 



94 



clt'livci'cd lip. There was some extra work after tlie 
coiilract was (•()ini)lete(l. having nothing to do witli 
the eontrael. 

AkhMinaii (iailieid staled that the contraetors swore 
tlie coulract was not roinpU'led. Siii)|iose tlu^y slnnitd 
lalic the same course proposed in relalion lo school 
houses, in assiiiijJHi;' I hai llierewasau ol)lij;ation lo 
pay for conlracts before coiiipleled. Tliere would he 
a gri'at liahilit.v upon the eily in the anionnl of work 
always going on. 

Akiei'inan Sayward said lu; would pay in such cases 
if there was a similarity in Ihe completion of the con- 
tvat^t. 

Alderinai) Clark said he was clear about the oilier 
case, but he had not made np his mind about this, 
and he hoped it would go back to the coinmitlee. 
He wished to know positively as to whether the i)ut- 
ting in of goods, and stoves was nol a virtual ac- 
knowledgment of the acce))taiice of the work, and he 
moved a iveommilment. 

Alderman (^uincy bad no ohjection to recommit- 
ment, but believed there would be no change in the 
result, for the same evidence would be put before the 
City Solicitor, to receive the same answer. 

Alderman Sayward could see no reason for recom- 
mitting to the same committee, who had made np 
their n'linds, and did not desire lo change them. 

Alderman Cutter said there were no reasons foi' 
sending Ihe report back. The keys of the building 
were in the contractors' hands, and the City Solicitor 
had given his opinion that the city was not bound to 
pay the claim. The,\ stood in the place of the city, 
and should stand by (he treasury and not spend the 
money in an illegal and trilling manner. If they did, 
it would open a wide gate, and they could not get rid 
of a multiliule of such claims. It ill became them to 
pay illegal claims. 

Alderman Saywavd objected that the Alderman still 
says he has no "right to vote accordi..g to his convic- 
tions. ^Yhen he'voted as lie believed it to be right, 
he did not wish to ha\e the vole called in question. 

Alderman Power claimed thai all the citizens and 
taxpayers are the city, and it was a part of their busi- 
ness to defend the rights of citizens, to defend every 
claiui which was a just one. A claim might be just, 
although illegal. The City Solicitor was supposed to 
look at the question in one v,ay merely, as to wheth- 
er it is legal, while it was not their duty to compel 
parties to go to law to get ti.eir rights. If justly en- 
titled to pay, they should not hesitate to pay claims. 
Alderman Sayward said he knew that n'ot e^ery- 
thing was stated to the City Solicitor. There were not 
stated to him the fads in relation to the piles, or that 
the superintendent of the work on the buildings on 
the part of the city had been paid for his services, 
which were two important points. He moved the 
substitution of the order in place of the report of thie 
committee. 

The question was taken on the recommitment, 
which was carried. 

ADDrrn)NAL room for city offices. 

On motion of Alderman Sayward the report and 
order to hire the Missionary Building in Pemhertou 
square, at an annual rent of" $7fMtO, for city purposes, 
were taken from the table. 

Alderman Sayward said all the inquiries had been 
made which were required iii relation to rooms in the 
church on Somerset street, and another building had 
been looked at, but none of them had the conven- 
iences which were needed. With the adoption of the 
order, the building in question could be occupied 
with but trifling expense, and all Ihe accommodations' 
provided which would he needed for years to come. 

Alderman Gibson said he went witii the chairman 
,of the committee to look around, and found that the 
rooms ill the church w(Mild not answer at all. and the 
members of neither hoard would be willing to go 
there. Tbey looked at another house in Pemberton 
square, the rent of which was fy.MIO, which was illy 
adapted for the uses of the city. The building on 
the corner was very desirable if they needed so mu«h 
room. He did not think so much was needed, and on 
inquiry whether the City Solicitor's present rooms 
.could be given up. it was believed they could not. but 
they might be rented at a less rate than now |)aid. 

Alderman Clark believed the city must hire some 
rooms, and thought the rooms in the church might 
answer the purpose. It was thought, however, that 



they niighl make a shift, by removing the Lamp 
Depart ineiit and giving the room to the Board of 
Health. The Milk Iiispeclor iniglil also be removed. 
Willi sui'h cliauges tliey mighl get along for awhile. 
Alderman Brown iiupiired how many committees 
needed aeoniinodations":' 

Alderman S.ayward said the rooms wove not wanted 
for c(nnmittees but for oflice accommoeations for de- 
partmeuts. The Boiu'd of Directors for Piibii<' Insti- 
liitions. Assessors and olher departments had asked 
for more accommodMl ions, and if the Legislature 
does what they had suggesled, certain changes must 
be made reciuiring otiier rooms. If this opportunity 
should be lost, another would not be had so good for 
years. The hiiikliiig on the opjiosite corner rented 
for $10,000, while this could be had for $7000. 

Alderman (Juincy c(miI(1 not agree with the Alder- 
man as to the accommodations in the church, and the 
rent of the Missionary Building; was believed to be ex- 
orbitant at $7000. I'ntil convi'uced of the exigency 
he could not vole lor the order. 

Alderman Sayward believed the rooms in the 
church were not fit for (he Board of Health. 

Alderman Oibson estimated the cost of the rooms 
in the other bouse in Pemberton square, fitted up, 
would be *:3r)00. 

Alderman Sayward said he had tlie opinion of Mr. 
Bradlee, who had the house to rent, that the Mission- 
ary building al $7000 woi^d be cheaper than the 
ot ber at $;i00O. That was the opinion also of Mr. 
Kirby, Mr. Cotton and others. The other building 
was the house of Mr. Atkinson, the next above the 
State constable's office. 

Alderman Hulbert said he believed it to be desira- 
ble to have all the public offices in the City Hall, and 
it was his ccmviction that with certain changes all of 
the departments could be accommodated in a manner 
of which they could not complain. Such accommo- 
dations could be afforded as were better than four- 
flfths of the merchants of this city put up with. 

Alderman Sayward said he should like to know 
where the accommodations are which the gentleman 
si)eaks of, for he did not know of such accommoda- 
tions. 

Alderman Hulbert believed there was no occasion 
for the removal of the Board of Directors for Public 
Institutions, who were well enough off as they are. 
As to the matter of accommodations in the City Hall, 
he knew whereof he spoke. Should a consultation be 
made with the Board of Health, he did not doubt sat- 
isfactory arrangements could be made with them for 
their accommodations. 

Alderman Power referred to the large amount of 
room in the upper part of the City Hall, and the am- 
ple accommodations of the Superietendent of Schools. 
They had been debating a long time about saving 
$1-H)0 in the payment of a claim, and he thought 
they might as well save the rent of $7000. 

Alderman Gibson, in further remarks in relation to 
the Missionary Building, was of the opinion that with 
the taxes and repairs it would cost $10,000 a year. 

Alderman Clark said he had been waiting to get 
more light from the Committee on Pixblic Buildings, 
who were divided in opinion on the subject. He had 
looked at the rooms in the church, and believed such 
as were needed for the Board of Health and Public 
Institutions might be had for $1000 a year, the city 
making its own repairs. The rooms answered well 
for a high school for girls for ten years, and provision 
might be made for the care of them by the janitor of 
the building at a small expense. 

In regard to rooms in the City Hall, the Superin- 
tendent of Schools had large and magnificent rooms, 
and it may be that tbey were all needed. Of that he 
did not understand. Accommodations might be had 
up stairs for some ofHces, and the Superintendent of 
Lamps and the Inspector of Milk might perhaps be 
removed to the church. 

Alderman Sayward said in regard to the room ad- 
joining the Common Council chamber, that that 
could not he used for offices, and the Superintendent 
of Printing was placed in a corner of it because no 
quarters could be had anywhere else. 

Alderman Clark made" a few remarks upon the 
suggestions of Alderman Gibson, that some occu- 
pants of rooms should ilonble up, and he moved an 
indetinite postponement of the order, which was car- 
ried by a vote of six to four. 
Adjourned 



95 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



MARCH 6, 1873. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common Coun- 
cil was held this eveniiii;, .at 7',2 o'clock, B. O. Shep- 
artl, the Prcsitk'iit, in tiic chair. 

A call of the roll ^^lll>\v(-ll Ihefollowing-namecl mem- 
bers to be present, there being a quorum: 

Abbott, Adams, Barn(•^, Bicknell, Bleiler, Boai'd- 
man, Brackett, Brenuan, Burditt, Caton, Collins, 
Cudworth, Dacey, Darrow, Dean, N. Doberty, T. H. 
Doherty, Edwards, Flatley, Flynn, Hall, Harrington. 
Hine, Holmes, Hughes, Lamb, Loring, Madden, Ma- 
han, Marston, Martin, McCue, McKeuney, Morse. 
Page, Perkins, Pickering, Powers, Eisteen, Shaw, 
Thacher, Tower, Upham, \^'arreu. West, Weston, 
Whiston, Wood.s, Woodward. 

AUDITOR'S ESTIMATES FOR 1873-74. 

The Auditor's estimates were laid before the Coun- 
cil, in print, as follows: 

Office op the Auditor of Accounts, I 
City Hall, February 27, 1873. f 

Edivafd 0. Shepard, Esq.^Presitlciiloflhe. Cotnmon 
Cwncil: Sir — The .Auditor of Act-oiints has the hon- 
or of submitting to the City Council, as recjuired by 
the ordinance relating to liuance, the accomi)anying 
estimates of the money which will be needed to de- 
fray the expenses of the city of Boston and the 
county of Suffolk for the financial year 1873-74, which 
commences May 1, 1873. and terminates April ;30, 1874. 
and pay the State tax of 1873. 

The estimated expenditures for 1873-74 are. . .$10,932,147 00 
The estimated income for 1873-74 is 2,545,650 00 



To which add three per cent, for the amount 
of taxes which will not be paid into the 
treasury during the Uiiaucial year 



!^,386,497 00 



251,595 00 



We have a total which, in the ,1u(lgment of 
the Auditor of Aceouuts, should be the 
gross tax forlS73,say $8,638,092 00 

The amount to be raised by taxation this year, as 
compared with that of last year, shows a large in- 
crease, as follows: 

Tax of 1873 $8,638,092 00 

Tax of 1872 7,759,842 00 



Increase of tax in 1873 $878,250 00 

Taking the valuation of the city ;it a sum of $45,- 
000,000 le.ss than it was last year, which wa.s .f(i82,- 
734,:300, in consequence of the loss of property by the 
great fire of November 9, 1872, and other causes, over 
the gains from valuation of new buildings e.ected 
during the year 1872, and the increase of value of real 
estate in some portions of the city, it will require to 
raise the amount of the ta.x, as above stated, of $8,- 
638,092, and the percentage to be levied by the Board 
of Assessors to meet abatements, a rate of about $14 
per .*1000 of property. This is an increase of $2 30 
per $1000 over that of 1872, which was $11 70. The 
fallowing table exhibits the rate of taxation on each 
$1000 of property for the past ten years: 

1863 $11 50 1868 $12 30 

1864 13:30 1869 13 70 



1865 

1866. 

1867. 



15 80 
13 00 
15 50 



1870. 
1871. 
1872. 



15 .30 
13 10 

11 70 



The average rate for ten years being $13 52 per 
thousand dollars. 

The aggregate of the interest to be paid on the 
gross debt of the city, and the gold premium, shows 
an increase of $434,000. The debt was largely in- 
creased the last municipal year, and has already been 
increased $3,000,000, foi- street improvements in the 
burnt district, and it will require in all prolmbilitv 
$1,000,000 to .$2,000,000 nnn-e for that purpose. Wilii 
this large increase of the debt of our city, a large in- 
crease of the interest account must of necessity fol- 
low. 

The estimates show the introduction of three new 
standing appropriations as compai-ed \\ith those of 
1872-73: one for the Board of Health, a department 
created by an ordinance i-elating to health passed by 
the City Council of 1872, who have charge of the gen- 
eral health of the city, the abatement of nuisances, 
etc.; one for Cedar Grove Cemetery, to the Board of 
Trustees of which the City Council granted an ap- 
propriation after the passage of the general appropri- 
ation order of 1872; one providing for the registration 
of voters and election expenses. The expenses at- 



tendhig elections have, heretofore, been charged 
to Printing and Incidental Expenses; the latter 
appropriation has been decreased the amount 
ustuilly charged to il for that purpose. The amount 
for registration of voters is to defray tlu' expenses 
lobe incurred in ado|)tiiig the new uiothud of regis- 
tering voters, which will be enact(!d by the present 
session of our State Legislature. 

Several of the departments, it will be seen, ask for 
largely increased aiipropriatious. The increase for 
the Fire Di'pattineiit is $lU(i,31(i, asked for principally 
to increase the force of that department, lour steam 
engines, five horse hose carriages, and one hook and 
ladder truck. Foi- the carrying on of the schools 
$139,525, of which amount .$105,275 is for instructors, 
the salaries of the grammar and ])ii!nary school in- 
structors having been increased in 1872. For the 
Board of lleallh and Health Deparlunnt an increase 
of $104,874, the increase being wanted for the purpose 
of organizing a new gang of street sweepers, and the 
more thorough abating of nuisances. For the police, 
$:30.00l). I() meet the pay for an increase of the num- 
ber of policemen. For East Boston I'ei'ries. ,$50,000, 
for a new boat. P'or sewers, $,50,000, to meet the in- 
creased wants for sewerage. For water works, $95,- 
500, caused by the laying of new service pipes, and 
increased cost of carrying on the works in conse- 
quence of their extension into the Roxbury and 
iJorchester districts. Foi- the West Boston and Crai- 
gie's bridges, .$49,000, the city having to bear one-half 
the cost of rebuilding Cragie's Bridge. 

The above gives the largest items of increase and 
the causes for it, and the following tables show the 
appropriations of 1872-3, compared with the esti- 
mates for the financial year 1873-74, exhibiting the 
increase and decrease of each, and the table shows a 
comparison of the estinuited revenue of 1873-74 with 
that of 1872-73. 

The total amount asked for the carrying on of the 
schools, is ,$1,400,125, and for Interest and premium 
$2,;348,000. 



Advertising $4,000 

Annuities 512 

Armoiies 25,000 

Board uf Health..., 

Boston llailior 10,000 

Bridges 26,500 

Cedar Urove Ceme- 
tery 

Cemeteries 16,500 

Charles River and 

Warren Bridges.. . 42,000 

Chestnut Hill Drive- 
way 5,000 

CityHospital 107,000 

Common, Public 

Squares, etc 90,000 

Contingent Fnnils.. 10,000 

County o( Sutlolk. . 2iK),oao 

East Boston ferries. 240,000 

Engineer'.s Depart- 

ihent 20,000 

Fire Alarms and 

Bells and Clocks. . 44,650 

Fire Department. . . 445,000 

Grammar School- 
house, L street,, .. 

Health Department, :W5,000 

Inspector of Build- 
ings 10,950 

Interest and Premi- 
um 1,284,000 

Incidental Expenses 90,000 

Lamps ,370,500 

Lj-man Schoolhouse 15,000 

Markets 10,000 

Militia Bounty 45,000 

Mount Hope Ceme- 
tery 16,000 

0\'erseers of the 

Poor 69,800 

Old ClaiUiS 1,500 

Paving, Grading, 
and Repairs of 

Streets 1,(K10,000 

Police 670,000 

Printing and Sta- 
tionery 30,000 

Public Baths 40,(KX) 

Public Buildings 92,000 

House of Indus^try.. . 153,500 

House of Correction 88,500 

Lunatic Hospital 63.000 

Pauper Expenses.... 31,000 

Sleamlioat "Henry 

Morrison" ', • 13,500 

Office l<:\|ienses 8,000 

Coal Slieds at Deer 

Island 15,tX)0 

Wharf at Deer Is- 
land 12,000 





CO 

a 


o 
P 


$6,000 
512 
22,000 
86,274 
10,000 
28,000 


$2,000 

86,274 
1,500 


$3,000 


3,000 
15,700 


3,000 


800 


7,000 




35,000 


5,000 
110,000 


3,000 




80,000 

10.000 

325,000 

290,000 


35,O0fJ 
50,000 


10.000 


24,000 


4,000 




50,940 
551,316 


6,290 
106,316 




15,000 
383,550 


15,000 
18,550 




16,800 


5,850 




1,695,000 

87,000 

390,000 

10,000 
45,000 


411,000 
19,500 


3,000 
15,000 


15,000 




1,000 


73,400 
1,500 


3,400 




l,OtXI,000 
700,000 


30,000 




35,000 
40,000 
92,000 
180,000 
90,51X1 
60,IKK) 
31,500 


5,000 

26,500 
2,0W) 

500 


3.000 


16,000 
8.000 


2,500 


15,000 
12,000 



MARCH 6, 1873 



96 





is'ii'-v;-!. 


Kstim'd 

is'ia-'ti. 


Inc. 


Kdusc f(ir Kimiiicer 








;il DciT IsliiMil.... 


1,500 






I'iil)lic Laiiils 


lO.tHW 


O.OIHI 




riihlic IJbnirv 


!)1,C«)0 


90,000 




Qiiniaiiliiir Dcpai't- 








iiit'iit . . . 


25,1)00 


t9,250 




lU'KiKtnilioii 1)1' Vo- 




tcl'K 1111(1 Kli'Ctioii 








Exin'iises 




20,000 


20,tt)0 


Kes(!rv«l Fiiiiil 


:ioo,(iiKi 


300,IHI0 






lOO.OlHI 


1IH1,(KI0 


0,000 


S(--liuuls and st-liool- 




lumsi's \i/. 


1H'.I,000 


l,021,S'i5 




SflKMil liistnictors.. 


105,275 


SoliiHil Kxpcuscs, 








Scliool (.'oiiiiiiilU't'. 


'r:>.,ooo 


80,750 


13,750 


SiilMiics Ollicers 


2t,00U 


24,500 


500 


ScIiooUhuiscs, Pub- 








lic BiiiliJiiif{s 


235,tK)U 


255.000 


20,000 


Seak'Vs of Weights 




and Mi'asiirt'S 


'i'.OOO 


7,00t) 




Sewers 


150,000 


2a),ooo 


50,000 


Siiil'CiiiK l^'iiml Coin- 










a,5wi 

711,020 


2,800 
7;5G,J80 


300 


State Tax 




Surveyor's JJepart- 








iiieiit 


:5s,ooo 


40,0(X) 


2.000 


Water Worlcs 


211,000 


a3(i,500 


05,5tR> 


Water \\ DrlvS, liilei-' 








est and I'nininni. . 


(i:;o,0oo 


(;5:!,0(.Ki 


23,000 


West I'.osloii and 








Criigle's Bridges.. . 


5,0(XI 


51,000 


40,000 


Widening Btveets.... 


325,000 


300,IHI0 





Dec. 

7,500 
4,000 
1,000 

5,750 



10,540 



5,000 



Totals $9,861,032 $10,1132,147 $1,222,705 $151,590 

Tlie follownig table shows the estimated income 
of 1872-78 compared with that of 1873-74. with the 
increase and decrease in each: 



Dec. 



$2,500 



10,775 



KHtim'il l>;slinrd ,,,,. 

1k;2 73. tS73-74. ""- ' 

Armories $10,0|iO $10,000 

City Hospital 3.500 3,500 

Cliarles- Kiver and 

Warren iiridges... 3,000 500 

Coninion :!.000 3.,(Ml 

Corponlion Tax.... JOO.noo tOO.lWO 

County ot Siiftolk.. '.»K>W f.'O.oiXi If30,0ii0 

East B"oston terries. iso.lioo 217,000 ;V;,000 

Fees 5,1HI0 5,5(11 5(10 

Fire Department... I.OIHI 2,IKI0 1,000 

Interest! 10,000 50.000 Ol.lHiO 

Health Department. 4:5,355 2(i,(J0O 

Militia hoiinty 45.0110 45.000 

OulstandinL'ta.xes.. 400,1KXI 450,000 50,000 

Overseers of Poor.. 10,550 17,.550 1,000 

Paviu"- .. 20,000 20.000 

Police 8,000 8,000 

Public instiliitions.. ti3,0IHI 80,IKK1 17,000 

Public Library 1,200 l,5(Hi 300 

Quaranlinc Depmt.. 5,000 5,0(Hi 

Kciils 100,000 105,(«HI 5,(H10 

Sflioo'ls . 23,(K)0 :«.()IH) 1,()(HI 

Se\yers . ... 55,01H) (iO.OlHl 5.000 

UncUiiiiied iiratts... I,5(X) 1,500 

Waterworks 810,101.) 81)0,000 79,900 

Totals $2,327,205 $2,545,050 $2:57,700 $19,255 

Total increase of estimated appropriations for ^,,^„, 
187:3-74 $1,222,705 

Total decrease of estimated appropriations for 
1873-74 1 51,590 

Net increase of estunated apppropriations fur 
187:M4 $1,071,115 



fncmnc. 



Estimated income 187:M4 
1872-73 



. $2,545,050 
. 2,327,205 

. $218,445 



Increase of income 187:3-74 

Perceiitiiye of Tuxes. 
3 per cent, on amount required ($S,:386,497) in 

1873-74 «~^1 •5«^' 

3 per cent, on amount reiiuired ($7,5;i3,82i) m 

1872-73 220,015 

Increase in 1873-74 $25,580 

RciiilJiliiliitioii. 



Net increase of appropriations in 1873-74. 
Net increase of percentage in lS7:j-74 



Less increase of income in 1873-74. 



,.$1,071,115 
25,580 

$1 ,09B,695 
.. 218,415 

luci-ease of the tax as before stated • $878,250 

The accompanying commuiiicafions, wliich I liave 
receiveti from the several lioards, departments and 
commiltees, contain tlie details yyjiicli aggregate the 
amount required. 

All of vvliich Is respectfully snlimitted. 

Alfred T. Thiiner, 
Audilor of Accounts. 

Referred to the Committee on Finance, with sucli 
as the Board of Aldermen may join. 



PAfEKS FROM TUB BOARD OP ALDERMEN. 

The ])etitions of Company B, Nintli Regiment, 
John O. Loriiig and others, Nathan S. Willjur and 
Jaco)) Rand were severally referred, in concurrence. 

The following reports were accepted, in coiicur- 
reiici': 

llcport inexpedient to accept the ofEer of rooms to 
tlie city by the First Baptist Church. 

Recommitment of report of leave to withdraw, on 
petition of Smith & McGaragle, to be paid the bal- 
ance on contract for erection of smallpox hospital, 
di'stroyed by lire. 

K'ecominitment of report of leave to withdraw, on 
petition of Ilolohan & Maguire, to be paid for con- 
tract work on tirst smallpox hospital. 

The report and an ordinance to amend an ordi- 
nance relating to public health was read twice and 
passed. 

The following orders were severally read once: 

Report and order to aulhorizc plans and estimates 
for a new primary schoolhouse on city land in the 
Prescott and Chapman districts. East Boston. 

Order that measnres be taken to keeji the streets on 
Burnt District free from obstructions and safe for 
public travel. 

Order authorizing an additional sum of .flOOO, for 
clerk hire in Assessoi's' Deiiartmenf. 

Order to pay C(jmpany A, Ninth Regiment M. V. 
IM., iifliOO per annum, for rent of armory on corner of 
Causeway and Lowell streets. 

Order authorizing not exceeding $;i!00 to be ex- 
pended in repairing and fnrnishihg the armory of 
said company. 

Order that there lie allowed an additional sum of 
.'|;7(l 70, f(u- rejiairing and furnishing the armory of 
Company K, Ninth Regiment M. V. M., on corner of 
Third and Dorcheirter streets. 

FIRST-ASSISTANT-ASSESSOR. 

The certificate of the election of James Dennie as a 
First-Assistant-Assessor, in place of Artemas R. 
Holden, chosen by this Council, was read, when the 
Council jn-oceedecl to aii election, resulting as fol- 
lows: 

Whole number of votes 53 

Necessary to a choice 27 

Artemas R. Holden 26 

James K. Crowley 14 

James Dennie 10 

H.N. Holbrook 3 

A second ballot resulted as follows: 

Whole number of votes 56 

Necessary to a choice 29 

Artemas K. Holden 38 

James Dennie 10 

James K. Crowley 5 

H. N. Holbrook 2 

Theopilus Burr 1 

Mr. Holden was again declared to be elected, in 
non-concurrence. 

SECOND-ASSISTANT-ASSESSORS. 

The report nominating certain persons named as 
Second-Assislant-Assessors, was accepted, in con- 
currence, when the Council proceeded to an election, 
under a sus])ension of the rules. 

Mr. Mahan of Ward .5 gave notice of the declina- 
tion of Daniel J. Courtney as a candidate from Ward 
.5, a nominee of tlie committee. 
The result of the liallot was as follows: 

Whole number of votes 57 

Necessary t(j a choice 29 

Ward \—Tii'o Difitrictn. 

John Noble 57 

Daniel J. Sweeney 57 

WtO'd 2— Two DixlricU. 

George W. Close 57 

Dennis Cawley, Jr 56 

M. J. Harkins 1 

Ward 3— One DMrict. 

Joseph Allen ;33 

Charles H. Boardman 20 

E. AV. James 4 

^yllrd I— Two Dislricls:. 

Martin Dowling 56 

William S. Whitney 57 

Owen Howard 1 

}]'irrd 'S—Two Disirirtf.: 

Roger H. Scannell 50 

J . ,J . 1 1 ughes m 

John J. (iailivaii 24 

John Donnelly 3 

D. .1. Courtney 4 

Ward 6— One DisiricL 

John T. Prince 43 

Emerson Coolidge 13 

\]'a)'d I—Two DUtriclH. 

Dudley Pray 30 

Jeremiah Sullivan 53 

James H. Magiier 29 



97 



OOMiMOlSr COUNCIL 



Ward S—One District. 

Ini D. Dav(!iiport 34 

M. H. Enwrislit. 23 

Ward \)—Two Districts. 

Francis li. Stoddard 57 

James Standisli rrt 

Ward W—Oiie District. 

Cliarlos B. llimtiiig 5(1 

Daniel Fiiiiiigau : 1 

Ward \\—Oii.e District. 
George W. Slduner 57 

M'ard Vi~Two Districts. 

Thomas Leavitt 5(i 

Joseph R. Grose 5(> 

M. H. Keeuau 1 

Ward liy— One District. 
Edward W. Dolaii 57 

Ward U—Two Districts. 

Elbridge 6. Scott ^'2 

William n. Mcintosh ) • 

J . E Learnerd * 

Ward ir,— Tii:o Districts. 

Henry A. Drake ^•' 

B. F. S. Bullard •' 

James II. Morrow ii 

Edwaid Kelley -l^ 

Ward W— Three Districts. 

John Pierce 5'J 

E. H. R. Buggies -ij 

George W . Conant fi; 

Oliver Hall ^^' 

The whole iHimber of Assessors required was de- 
clared to he elected, Messrs. Hughes of Ward 5 in 
place of Gallivau, Kelley of Ward 15 in place of Bul- 
lard, and Hall of M'ard l(i in place of Conant, m non- 
concnrreuce. 

LINTINISIIED BUSINESS. 

The order to allow for payment sundry bills for 
extra services by certain policemen therein named, 
being under consideration- 
Mr. Page of Ward 9 inciuircd the nature of the ser- 
vices for which payment was asked. 

Mr. Martin of Ward 7 replied that lie was not 
aware that the matter had been before the Committee 
on Police. 

On motion of Mr. Page, the order was referred to 
the Committee on Police. 

WIDENING OF FEDERAL AND OTHER STREETS. 

The resolve and order to widen Federal street to 
sixty feet from Summer to Milk street (Printed City 
Document No. 31, 18T8,) coming up— 

Mr. Perkins of Ward (i moved to lay on the table 
the several orders for widening and extending 
streets, with a view to offeiing a resolution. 

The Chair stated tli<> i;|neslion to be on the single 
order undei- consideration .and the question being 
taken, the oi'dcr was laid on the table. 

Mr. Perkins oifered the following resolution: 

Resolved, That the resolves and orders now before 
the Common Council for the extension of Oliver 
street, the widening and extension of Pearl street, 
the widening and extension of f'lanklin street, and 
the widening of Milk, Federal aud Congress streets, 
except those parts of Federal aud Congress streets 
north of Franklin street extended, have the snpport 
of the Couuei], and that the Council hereby assures 
the property o\\ners affected by the contemplated 
changes in ilie lines of the foregoing streets, that the 
said resolves and orders, siibjecf to tlie foregoing ex- 
ceptions, will be adopted whenever a ilecision can 
be reached in regard to Ihe portions of those streets 
reserved in this resolution. 

Mr. Perkins stated in explanation of the resolve 
that there was no queslion in regard to Ihe proposed 
improvements, except (hat of widening Federal street 
between Franklin and Milk streets, and Congress 
street, noith of Milk street. The Street Commission- 
ers were not prepared to ask for the passage of the 
resolves and orders at the last meeting of the Coun- 
cil, and since then the text of the ai)])roi)riations by 
Congress had been sent by telegrapli requiring a fur- 
ther widening of streets in the neighborhood "of the 
Post Ottice and the removal of the buildings on the 
triaugulai- space of ground between Congress, Milk 
and Bath streets. This despatch he read, as contain- 
ing all the information known on the subject, and it 
was desired to ascertain the whole conditions before 
action was taken in Ihe matler. 

The C£Uestion to be decided was what should be for 
the best interests of the city, and whelher to concede 
to the United States Government in I'elation to the 
line of widening, to secure the expenditure of one 
and a half millions of dollars. The Street Commis- 
sioners had no recommendations to make, and the 
Council was called upon to indicate their choice as 
citizens and not as members of the Council. No ac- 



tion could be taken until further orders should be 
sent to the City Council in relation to the triangular 
piece of land, and the reason was obvious, that if the; 
present orders should be passed without providing 
for the taking of so much as will be left in the exten- 
sion of I'earl street, the value of the laud will be so 
increased that it cannot be had except at an exorbi- 
tant price. 

It was accordingly desirable that the resolution 
should be passed, so that all persons in the burnt 
district embraced within its provisions should bo re- 
lieved as. to the act ion of the City Government, and 
the property owners assured that those are the lines 
to be establish(!d just as soon as the question on the 
whole of these connected orders can be put to tlie 
Council. There will be no change; in the |)lans so far 
as relate to the extension of Olivta' street, the 
widening of Milk and fi'ranklin streets and the widen- 
ing of Federal and Congress streets as far as the 
northerly line of Franklin street, which are satisfac- 
t<.)ry to every one. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 iiu|nired what effect the action 
of the United States (iovcrnment w<nild have upon 
the widening of Federal street, at the C(n'ner 
of Milk sti-eel, for the gentleman from Ward (i 
had not explained it. Itefore he voted he wished to 
know what effect the action of Congress would have 
upon the widening of Federal street. 

Mr. Pei'kins replied th.at it would have no elTect at 
all. The resolution was ott'ered simply because, so 
far as l\\v contest was settled, there slu)uld be no de- 
lay. The reas in why the Sti'ci'l Coniinissioners do 
not send out the necessary orders for further taking 
of land is that they do no! wish to until there is an 
expression of oiiinion whether it is desirable to go 
into such an expense as k\ ill be re(iuired. 

Mr. Shaw said the geutlenian had not answered his 
interrogatory. Kvcrythiug was to be jiassed upon liy 
.■1 wholesale sweep of a resolutiiui exeejit in relation 
to the widening of Federal street, and when he asked 
the basis of the action, he was answered by reference 
to the action of Congress in regard to another mat- 
ter. Again he asked what, the acliiiu of Congress had 
to do with the widening of l<\'deral street to its junc- 
tion at Milk street. The gentleuian takes it for 
granted that at I the other mailers are agreed upon, and 
yet no votes have been taken to indicate any such 
feeling. 

It had been said that the re|H)rl of (he plan of the 
Street Commissioners received the unanimous vote 
of the CommiKee on S(r<'els. There had been two 
weeks' delay in (he acdon upon it, and the cry_of the 
citizens was, why this delayv And now (here' was to 
be another delay in regard to Federal street. It was 
an unusual thing lo pass such measures by a sweep- 
ing cl.ause of this kind, and if adopted it would be 
an extraordinary state of things. It was proper to 
consider t hese se\era,l streets in detail ami not by a 
wholesale I'esolutiou, important as were these meas- 
ures to the public. 

The city of l^.oston was competent to act in these 
matters without the dictation of Congress, or know- 
ing from whom or to whom it may come. The reso- 
lution ai)peared to be the result of the action of the 
<."omniittee (ui Sti eets, but noexjilanatiiui had been 
made to satisfy him. He did not wish to impede 
progress, but believed they were liere for the purpose 
of acting upon the order in the report of (he commit- 
tee. If he was not coi'rect he asked to he set right. 
He thought it would be boys' play to have the reports 
laid over or pass<'d by resolution. It might be his 
stupidity. l)ut lie had" yet to learn the necessity of 
passing llie lesolution. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 said the order was laid over 
from the last meeting to ascertain the action of Con- 
gres^J, and since then the Governuu'iit had called foi' 
the laving out of .a piece of land of fiiM) feet, at a cost 
of soiiie i|fJ(Jll,(lll(). It was believed thai a space of 
seventy feet in front of the Post OIVk'c was sutticieut, 
and he was not in favor of action to please the post- 
mastei' or anybody else. 

The I'esolutieui was i)assed — 3'.) in fav(U'. none in op- 
position. 

Mr. l,oring of Ward 12 offered the following order: 

Ordered, That the ri\«olve and (U'der for the widen- 
ing of Federal street from Summer to Millc street be 
recommitted to the Street Commissioners, with in- 
structions to report a resolve and oi'der for the widen- 
ing of Federal street from Summer to B'rankliu street, 
substantially in accordance with the plan made by 
vhe City Surxeyor, dated January "27, 1.S73. and adopf- 
eil by the Street Commissioners. February ■^7. 1873; 
also a separate resolve and cuder for th<' widening of 
Federal street between Franklin ami Milk streets to 
sixty feet by taking land on the easterly side. 

Mr. Loriug, in support of the order, said in view of 
the weight of teslimony, (he widening of Federal 
street from Fianklin street to T\Iilk street should be 
on the easterly side, so as to make, as far as possible 



MARCH 6 



1873 



98 



a conliniiDiis street, to Coiigi'css street, and ho had 
y(^t to hem- of the first good reason for the widening 
on tlie westei-ly side. Kor tlie i)nri)ose of s;ilisl'ying 
liiniself in regard to tr,ivel, lie wateliexl thi' e(nirse of 
it yesterday, and foinid that I In-ee-fourlhs of tlio 
ti'avel from Kedera) stri'et into Milk street was to 
Congress street; and of fifteen teams (n- earriages 
fourteen went down to one ill). One of the argn- 
nuMits for the widening on the westerly side was that 
the travel would go into Devonsliire street, ])evon- 
sliire street was extended for the purpose of reliev- 
ing Washington street, and Devonshire strck't was 
now erowded with travel. 

'I'he tcniiiiintion of Federal street at Milk street, as 
proposed liy the ('oinniissioners, was agiiinst thePost 
tiflice, and not, as it should be, a continuons street 
'I'lie etl'eet of it would be as in State street, where 
the travel seeking Court street goes np the northerly 
side of the Old Slate lloase, and if one portion of it 
should he closed it would be the southerly portion in 
preference to the other. 

Mr. VVidls of Ward :! said he had taken notice re- 
cently of the course of t ravel in that vicinity, with 
refernce to tile blocks in conse(|iienee, and he was 
of oiiinion i.hat the resolve and order should be re- 
ferred hack to the ( '(nnmissicniei's. 

Mr. Flyiiii replied that it should be understood that 
Milk aiui Congress streets were to be widened to sixty 
feet, which wonld greatly relieve the crowds at that 
portion of the streets, and it should furtlier be con- 
sidered that Congress street wonld be a great thor- 
oughfare to South Ijost(ni in the future. 

Mr. Barnes of Ward 11 inquired wliat would lie the 
difference in expense between the plans of widening 
on the easterly and westerly side. 

Mr. Loring replied that he put the question to the 
Chairnuni of the Street Commissioners, who s:iid that 
there would be no material diftercnee in the e\-pense; 
and in relation to grade he wonld like to know of the 
committee if the ditTerenee of grade had lieon con- 
sidered liy them, 

Mr. Plyiin replied that' his im]iression was that an 
order had been passed to make the grade the same 
through the territory of the burnt district. 

Mr. Loring Siiid he should .indge thnt the difference 
in H'rade was at least ten fcei lielween ('ongress and 
Devonshire streets. Federal street and not Congress 
street must be the thoroughfare to South Boston. 
The construction of the bridge to South Boston to 
connect with Congress street could not be within ten 
or fifteen years, and if he was to be governed liy self- 
interest rather t! an liy his judgment, he slionld pre- 
fer to have Congress street the thoroughfare. As 
an owner of seven acres of Hals he wonld give his 
check for flO.OUO could tlie new avenue be completed 
in ten years It was all nonsense to contend that 
Congress street is to be the great thoroughfare, for 
Federal street is and must be the thoroughfare to 
South Boston and out of town, 'i'he manner of agree- 
ing to the sireet wiilenings he olijeered to. in the 
Street Commissioners Indding conferences with the 
Committee on Streets, making it an ex parU matter. 
By looking to the naked facts in the case, the com- 
mittee would arrive at better opinions, 

Mr, West of Ward 10 said he was favorably im- 
pressed with the plan of the gentleman from Ward 
l(j when he first looked at it, because from his knowl- 
edge of the corner of Milk, Federal and Congress 
streets in the last twelve years in its being. ('onstantly 
blocked. In the widening it shcnild be considered 
that Milk street is to be widened, and the grade 
is to be raised, and by widening on the westerly side, 
the travel will be nior<' easily (livid 'd, jiassing into 
De\'.)nshire street .as eNteiided'as a tlioroiigiifare. 

Mr. Biirdittof Ward I(i said if it was jiossihle to 
have Federal street a direct street, running into Con- 
gress street, he would go with the gentleman from 
VVard 12, but it could not he without goinu' across 
the Post OlHce, It was desiralile, tlien, to divide the 
travel, and he believed tlie marginal streets would, 
in future, lake mucli of the heavy travel, 

Mr. Flynii, with refei'iMice to the building of the 
new avomie to Smith Boston, called attention to the 
indenture made last year, by which he believed the 
avenue would be made in fi\'e years, and lie could 
take the check of the gentleman on tliat conilition. 

Mr, Perkins ofi'ered Ihe following as a siibstil lite 
for the order of Mr, Loriiig: 

Kesolved, 'rii.al the Common Council ajiprove tlie 
plans of the Street Commissioners for the widening 
of Federal and Congress streets from Franklin street 
extended to Milk street, and hereby assure the prop- 
erty ludders on I hose streel s I lial I lie orders in which 
those plans are embodied shall be passed as soon as 
the otlier orders with which they are necessarily con- 
nected can be jii'epared ami considered. 

Mr. Perkins stated, in exiilanallon of the views of 
the Commissioners, that as it was not expected tliat 
Federal street would be a continuous street to Con- 



gress street, it would be better to take the travel so 
that it might be divided between Congress and Dev- 
onshire streets, the foot travel especially takuig the 
iqilicr side to Devoiishiri^ street. 

Mr, Hal! of Ward 10 lioiied the substitute would be 
p.assed, for the Street Commissiomn-s, after full con- 
siiUa-ation oj' tlu! subject, believed the widening of 
Milk street at this point would be ample to obviate 
the difficulty of blocking the street, and it should be 
considered that this street was but thirty-eight feet 
vvidi! previous to the widening, 

Mr, Wells stated that the travel downward was a 
continual stream, and with the widening of Federal 
street on the easterly side, there would be a chance 
to turn without blocking. Nineteen of twenty teams 
would take the down grade rather than the up one, 
and he failed to find any man who would drive up 150 
feet to turn a shar]) eorni'r. when by going ten or 
twelve feet he could make a better turn. He hoped 
the substitute would not jirevail. 

Mr. Brackett of \\an\ 10 hoped the substitute 
wonld prevail, for it would give the abutters the 
same assurance that those have on the other 
streets, thai, there is to be no further delay. The 
Street Commissioners gave three hearings on the 
subject, the result of which was that in their best 
judgment the widening should be on the westerly 
side of the street. These all were related to one 
whole, and if one was to be changed, it might neces- 
sitate the change of others. He would abide in the 
judgment of llie Commissioners rather than have 
more delay. During the debate in the Board of Al- 
tlermen, the Chairnian of the Committee on Streets 
stated that a recommitment would involve a delay of 
four weeks, at an exiiense of $.')0,000 a day. The re- 
port was entitled to their consideration and respect. 

Mr. Lorina' stated that those most interested in the 
widening oh the easterly side would be the greatest 
sufferers in case of delay, and the weight of te.sti- 
niony in favor of the widening on that side came 
from' these persons who were "to be affected by it. 
The question was how to make the w'idening to serve 
the public interest, and if there should be "any loss 
from the delay, those who wished this widening 
would be the sufferers. 

ftlr. Flynii stated that should there be a recommit- 
ment there must be fourteen days' notice after the 
action taken by the Board of Aldermen. 

Mr, Perkins said it was a mistake to say that the 
abutters on the easterly side ask for the widenmg on 
that side. 

Mr. Loring replied that the weight of testimony 
showed that they were in favor of it, although he 
would not claim that all the abutters were in favor 
of it. 

On motion of Mr. Perkins, the previous question 
was ordered, and the substitute was adopted for the 
order of Mr. Loring. 

The several resolves and orders for the widening of 
Milk street, the widening and extension of Pearl 
street, the extension of Oliver street, the widening 
of Congress street between Water and Broad streets, 
and the extension of Franklin street to Sturgis street, 
were laid on the table. 

Mr. Perkins offered thefoLowing resolution: 

Resolved, That in the opinion of the City Council 
it is expedient to take and lay out as a public way of 
the city, that parcel of laud remaining between the 
proposed extension of Pearl street to Congress street, 
at Water street. Congress street widened to seventy 
feet on the easterly side, and Milk street after the com- 
pletion of the said contemplated improvements, and 
also to widen Water street lietween Devonshire and 
Congress streets, on the northerly side, to sixty feet, 
by taking land from the estate of Edward A, White 
and others, trustees, and the estate of Beats, Greene 
& Company; and requesting the Sireet Commission- 
ers to report orders and estimates of the cost at the 
earliest pi'acticable moment, 

Mr, Perkins said the order was ofifered simply for 
the imrpose (d' obtaining the views of the Council on 
the subject. It was not one of those cut and dried 
matters of which the gentleman from Ward 13 had 
spoken, and did not come from the Committee on 
Streets. Yet If Water street was to be widened fui'- 
ther, it would be well to have an expression of opin- 
ion, and without it it is supposed there will not be 
the large expenditure on the Post C>llice which is 
contemplated. 

Mr. Plyiin of Ward 7 believed that the order would 
keep one we(Ov, and moved that it be laid on the 
table, which was carried. 

PETITIONS PRESKNTED AND REFERRED. 

John Lynch, for leave to construct an addition to 
his building on Foundry street, beyond the legal di- 
mensions. 

Edward Bryant, for leave to erect a wooden shop 



99 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



in Fninkliii comt, neai' Norfolk avciitio, Ward 1(1, 
beyond (he legal dimensioDfi. 

Severally referred to Cominitlee on Survey and In- 
spection of Buildings. 

AUDITOK's monthly EXIIir.lT. 

The Auditor's monthly exhibit was laid before 
the Council in print, it beina; an exliibit of tlie gen- 
eral and special appropriations for tlie present linan- 
cial year of ISTS-TS, as shown in tlie hooks in his of- 
fice, 'March ], 187:^, incliidinij; the Mareli draft, beins 
eleven months' payments of the linancial year, -ex- 
hibiting tlie ont;inal ai)propriat ions, the amount ex- 
pended', and the balance of each unexpended at that 
date. A recapitulation gives the following result:— 

Aijpropriations, 

Revenues, etc. ExpenOeil. Unexpended. 

General *'.i.9li),92B 41 $S,7tiO,8i5 GO i;i.210,110 SI 

Special 1(MIK.i,554 63 4,:;4.5,894 11 li,ir>4.05H '.»2 



$20,311, ISl 01 
Oidered to he sent up. 



$12,946,710 31 *7,364,770 73 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Blackniar ofAVard 11, from the Committee on 
Claims, repoited leave to withdraw sev<'ra]iy on peli- 
tions of William Whittaker lo l)e compensated for 
the death of his son caused by tlie discharge of fire- 
works at Independence square on tlie .'jth of July, 
1872, and of Philip McDoiiough to lie compensated 
for injuries received by his son fi-oni an explosion 
of fireworks at Independence square .5lh of July, 187'2; 
also of M. C. Murray to be conipi^nsated for damages 
to his property caused by an alleged defect in Tre- 
mont street. Severally accepted. 

The same committee reported leave lo withdraw 
on petition of -Joseph K. and Mary -T. Meleher to be 
compensated for damages caused to said Mai'y fl. 
Melchei- by her being si'iit lo the smallpox hosi>ital 
without c;'iuse, and on iietition of Lydin A. Edgecomb 
to be compensated for damages caused by the failure 
of the health ofiicers to removi; from her house a 
person sick with smallijox. Severally accepted 

Mr. Burt of Ward l(i, fronillie -loinl Standing Com- 
mittee on the Fire Department, to whom w.as referred 
the iietition of S.-imuel 1). CraiU' and forly-lwo others 
that a sti'am tire engine be loeati'd in Ward 11, .after 
a citreful consideration of llu' subject, reported that 
they find there is no steain lire engine located in thai 
section of llu^ city, while it conlains a taxable valua- 
tion of $-r),0()0,fK10; Kngine No. ;i, locMled on Wash- 
ington sheet, near Do\'er street. lOngine No. Vi. being 
the next netirest steamer, located on (he corner of 
Warren and Dudley streets, a mile and one-fourth 
from Engine No. :i. while across the city from east to 
west are a mile and thri^e-eighths. 

In this large area of territ(U'y there are some of the 
largest manufactories of the city, with many exten- 
sive lumber yaids. In view of all these facts, the 
eomniiltee are unanimous in the opinion that the 
prayer of the petitionei-s ought to be granted, and 
would therefore recommend the passage of the ac- 
companying order: 

Ordered, That the Chief-Engineer be authorii^ed to 
locate and equip ;i steam fire engine in the house now 
occupied by Chester llose No. 4 (Ui Nortlunnptou 
street, and the expense thereof to be chargeil to the 
appropriation for the Fire Depart meiit. 

The report was accepted and the order was passed. 

Mr. Flynii of Ward 7, from the .Joint Standing 
Committee on Streets, to whom was referred the or- 
der of the Board of Street (.'ommissionei's authorizing 
the taking by the city of I he estat<' of M. II. (ileeson 
on Summer street, at the cornel' of High street, made 
a repoi-t that the order ought to pass. They also 
recommend the passage of the accompanying or- 
der: 

Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Streets be and they are hereby authorized to sell in 
such manner, and upon such terms as they inav 
deem best for the interest of the city, the iiorlion of 
the estate taken from M. H. Gleeson on the corner 
of Summer and High streets, which is not required 
for Ihe impioveinent of said streets, the proceeds 
of said Side to be jiaid into I hi' City Treasury. 

Mr. Deiin of Ward 12 moved, as an amendment, to 
provide that the sale shall be by anctitm, but on tlie 
statement being made that the remaining land would 
be bill a small parcel, valuable only to the owner of 
the adjoining property, tlie amendment was wilh- 
drawn and the order was jiassed, together with the 
original order. 

Mr. Flynn, from the same committee, to whom was 
referred the order authorizing his Honor the Mayor 
to release to Samuel B. Pierce, upon certain terms 
and conditions, a parcel of land discontinued from 
Forest-Hills avenue, in widening the same, made a 
report that the order ought to jiass 

The order piovides for the release of 8880 square 
feet of land adjoining the estate of said Pierce, upon 



the conveyance to the city by him of a parcel of land 
auKninting to smil squarit feet, taken from an estate 
of his to widen said Fore;-t-Hill avenue, by an order 
of the Street Commissioners, December :lil, 1872. 

The report was aece\)red. and the order was passed. 

Mr. Flynn oliered the following order: 

Oi-di'red, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Streets lie authorized lo sell, in such manner and 
upon such terms as they may deem best for the inter- 
est of the cily, the poitiim of the estate taken from 
C. M. Wlu'elwright (ui the cornel' of Water street and 
Uroad street, which is not required for the improves 
ment of said streets; tlie proceeds of said sale to be 
paid into the City Treasury. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward .Amoved an amendment to pro- 
vide that this sale of land shall be by auction. 

Mr. Page <d' Ward !i stated that Ihi's case was simi- 
lar to that jnsi acled upon, Ihei'e being but a small 
piece of land of little value except to the adjoining 
estate, and it would save expense by making the sale 
private, while if it is i'e(|uired to b(^ public, and im- 
perative, there may lie no otlu^r bidder than the party 
immediately interested, whose luilicy would be to get 
it by as low bid as possible. 

Mr. Loring of Ward 12 wished to know the bouiiils 
of the land. 

Mr. Page stated that the width of the lot on Broad 
street was very slight, but quite deep on Water 
street. 

Mr. Blackniar of Ward 11 said there bad been no 
argument of .'iiiy foree why the lot should not be put 
np ti) llie highest bidder, which he Ihonght to lie a 
good policy which should always be followed. 

Mr. Holmes of Ward (i wislu'd to know if there was 
no mininium sum li.xi'd, otherwise in a public sale 
I.Ik^ land might be sacriliced. 

Mr. I'age slaled thai ill the case of a sale of a small 
lot of land on Smitli Market street, last year, the lot 
was sold less by public aiictiini than it would have 
br'oughl, at iiri vale sale. 

Mr. Loring moved that it be laid on the table, with 
a view, he was proceeding to say, when Mr. Shaw 
raised a jioiut of «rder that the motion was not de- 
batable. 

The iioini of order was sustained and the order was 
laid on Ihe table. 

Mr. Calon of Ward 11, from tlie Joint Standing 
Committee on the Survey and InspiK'tion of Build- 
ings, to wlumi was referred the jietiticm of P. Camp- 
bell & Son for leave to erect a wooden addition lo 
shed situated (Ui lieed street, lU'ar Swell '^tret't, made 
a repiu't recomuicnding Ihe passage of Ihe following 
ord<'r: 

Ordered, That the Inspector of Buildings lie au- 
thorized lo issue a pi'rmit to P. Campbell & Son to 
ereel a wooden addition to shed, situate on Reed 
si reel, near Swell, street, in acciu'danee wilh an aj)- 
jilicatiim im lile in the otlieeoflhe Deparlmeiit for 
Ihe Survey and Insiieclion of Buildings. 

The report was accepted and the order was passed. 

Ml'. Caton, from the same committee, to whom 
was referred the petition of Winchester A Might for 
leave to erect a wooden buililingim Doreliesler ave- 
nue and Koundry street, luiide a report recommend- 
ing the passage of the fohowing order: 

Oidered, That the Ins|)eel()r of lUiildings be au- 
thorized lo is.«ue a permil, to V\'inchi'ster & Hight to 
erect a wooden building in Dorchester avenue and 
Foundry street, in accordance with an application 
on lile in Ihe olticc^ of the Di'partment for the Survey 
and Inspecli<ni of Buildings. 

The report was aeceiiled, and the order was [lassed. 

Ml'. Caton, from the Comniil tee on Survey and In- 
spection of liuildings, made a reptu't that in their 
opinion the public safety demands that immediate 
measures should be taken to examine all buildings in 
Koston in which operativesare employed, for the pur- 
pose of ascertaining llieir sal'('ty and the means of 
escape in ease of fire. 

The destruction <d' the workrooms on the Iniriit 
district has necessitated the occupation of a large 
number of rooms which were not originally intended 
for siu'li purposes, and wliicli in most cases are lo- 
cated in the uiiper stonesof high buildings accessible 
only by hnig llights of narrow stairs. 

Should a fire occur in the lower stories of any such 
buildings while thr. operatives are therein emiiloyed, 
it wiuild be almost certain to cut off all means of es- 
cajif, and the loss of lif(^ would be fearful. The eom- 
niiltee already know t\\' one building, in which 22.5 
liersons, mostly females, depend upon a staircase .S,',j 
feet wide for means of esea|n' in case of lire. The 
eomniiltee feel the necessity of immediate action, and 
in order that there may be 'no delay in maUing the 
necessary exaniination,"tliey respectfully request that 
authority be grained to employ, temporarily, a suffi- 
cient number of ])ersoiis lo make such examinations. 

The commit lee therefore i'(^spectfully recommeud 
the passage of the following order: 



IVTAROH 6, 1873 



100 



Ordered, That the Iiispecl.or of Buildings be direct- 
ed to iiiniiedialely exiimine,;!)! linildin<;s in Boston in 
vvliieli operatives are employed, to aseertain wiielliei- 
tliey are provided with siiliicient facilities for eseajje 
in case of lire, and I hal lie he aulhori/.cd to emi)loy 
SMcli teniixirary assistanee as may be required lo 
make sMcli examinations, at an expense not ex(H'edinfit 
f 1(K)0; to he eliar;;-ed to l\\i'. appropriation for the In- 
si)eetion of I5iiildint,'s. 

'J'Ik^ (piestiou hi'ing upon the second reading;' of the 
order — 

Ml-. Shaw of Ward 5 ros(! for information, and 
wished to know how many assistants were now em- 
ployed. 

Mr. Caton replied that until today there were but 
three assistants, and they were not able to attend to 
the new work which required their attention, while 
it was designed to employ these to be provided for 
temporarily. 

Mr. Shaw wished to know if the persons to be 



ai)|)ointed were practical men, or were broken-do vvn 
policemen. 

Mr. Caton reiilit^d that all of the inspectors were 
practical men, master mechanics, masons or carpen- 
ters. 

Mr. Pease of Ward 1 stated that the law required 
them to be practu'al men. 

Mr. Shaw said thv. reason for his inquiry was that 
last year a police ollicer was appointed against whom 
sericius chari,'es were preferred. 

An amendnieul was proposed to require the ap- 
proval of the ('ominittee on Survey and Inspection of 
Buildings in the aiiiiointinents to be made. 

Mr. Ciitoii stated that the appointments of inspec- 
tors were made wit h the approval of the Mayor, and in 
answer to inquiries stated that there had been three 
assistant-inspectors, and three additional appoint- 
ments had been submitted to the Mayor today. 

The amendment was lost — 16 to 19 — when the order 
was laid over under the rules. 

Adjourned. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



101 



CITY OF BOSTON, 

ProcotMliuf's of the Board of Aldonnon, 

MARCH 10, 187a. 

The rcsniixr weekly meeting of tlic Bojirrtof Alrtcf- 
nien was lickl this afteniooii, at. tour o'cloclc, Aldev- 
maii Cutter, the chairman, presidiufj'. 

JIIBOliS DIIAWN. 

Six petit jurors were drawn for I lie United States 
District Court. 

ArrOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Sealers of Weights and Measures and Inspcu-tors of 
Charcoal Baskets— Wm. K. Ueed, Charles K. M, I'ratt. 

Measurers of Upper Leather— William Bragdon, 
William Powers, George W. Bragdon, Melville C. 
Bragdon. John W. Bragdon, .Tr. 

Sjiecial Police Otlicers, without pay— John Kenne- 
lie, at the coi'ner of Mount Washington avenue and 
Federal street; J. P. Kecfe, at the Boston Cathedral 
and Castle-stroct Church; William J. Coleman, for 
the luiriit district; George II. Maguire, at Bowdoin- 
squ.arc! Church; Joseph K.Thomas, atBerkeley-streel 
Stabk^ 

Weigher of Coal — George E. Frost. 

Weigher of Coal and Measurer of Wood and Jiark— 
Frederic H. Lewis, Frank M. Hatch. 

Constable— Jacol) T. lieers. 

Undertaker— Jiiliez B. (!ole. 

Mend)ers of the Fire Department— George W. 
Frost, I'oreman, and John M. Powers, assistaut-fore- 
man of Hook & l^addcr C<impany No. 4: John W. C. 
Prescott, foreman, and J. W. l>andall, assistant-fore- 
man of Insurance Brigade; James Sturks, to take 
effect from ft'ebiuary 2f, 187:!: Mark W. Ifayes to 
(ill the vacancy occas'ioned by the death <ir James 
Sturks, to tak('. effect March 1. Mortimer D. Gill, as 
a member. ,Iohn Kelly, hoseman, Charh^s W. llodg- 
don, driver, and Joliu F. Barber and Edward M, 
Grant as hosemcn, to take effect March 1. 

Police Otlicers -Martin Ij. White as a lieutenant and 
Albion Adams and Daniel M. Hammond to be ser- 
geants of police: James Mcljaughlin and Freeman 
Hanscom as police officers. 

Ki^ferred to Committee on Police. 

TETITIONS rilESBNTED ANT) REFERRED. 

Ann Welch, to be paid for grade damages atNo.jlSS 
Fourth street. 

Joseph Strt'ck, to be paid for grade damages on 
Cabot street. 

Albert Blaisdell, that a portion of Ha.wley street be 
closed during the reuwval of the walls of Trinity 
Church. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Paving, the 
last with full pouiu-s. 

Mary ,lane Sliedd, for abatement of assessment for 
a sewer in Bustis street. 

William K. Gray and others, against the proposed 
construction of a sewer in St. James street. 

Severally referrc^d to the Comaiittee on Sewers. 

Lafayetic M. Perkins for leave to occupy a wooden 
stable ' for two horses, near Iluntington-avenue 
bridge. , 

Joseph J. McCarthy, for li'ave to occupy a wooden 
stable for two horses on Cherry street, near Ijlue-Iiill 
avenue. 

Gctorge G. Poland, for leave to occupy a wooden 
stable for live horses on Harrison avenue, near Mai- 
den street. 

Thomas Conner, for leave to occupy a wooden 
stable for one horse on Cherry street, rear No. ail. 
Ward U. 

Sex'crally referred to CJommittee on Health on the 
part of tins Board. 

W. L. Lotbrop, lo be paid for loss of property dur 
in? tile lire by action of otlicers of the city. 

Sister Mary Kli/,abetli and Sister Mary Ilegiiia of 
St. Joseph's ilouse, to lie jiaid for injury to a horse. 

Severally referred to the Commit lee on Claims. 

Joseph Murdock and others and William R.Gray 
and others, against the jiroiiosed removal of a tree 
from K,egeiit sticel. H.efcrred to the Committee on 
Common on the part of this I'.oard. 

Thomas W. Carter, for leave to change the iiosilion 
of certain buildings on the City Hosi)ital lot recently 
let lo him. Kef erred to Committee on Public Lands 
on the part of this Board. 

Benjamin FrauUlin, for permission to erect a build- 
ing on I'almer sli-i'ct beyond the legal limits. Ke- 
f(M'red to ('ommittee on Survey and Inspection of 
Buildin;;s. 

BeaJs, Greene & Co., against the proposed widening 
of Water strei^t uiion llunr estate. L'ead .'ind sent 
down. 

The I'emoiist ranee is as follows; 

To tlie City Council of the f!ity of Boston— From 
our repoi'l of the proceedings of the Common Coun- 
cil at its meeting on Thursday (evening last, we learn 
that a resolve was offered t hat in the opinion of the 



CJity Council it is expc^dicnt to widen that part of 
Water street which lies bet\v(!en Devonshire and Con- 
gress streets, by taking land from our estate on the 
northerly side of Water street; that is to say, by tak- 
ing a part of the Boston Post building. The resolve, 
we observe, was laid on the table. We embrace the 
earliest moment possible, upon being informed of 
this contemplated movement, respectfully to remon- 
strutc against, the [lassage of the resolve. And we 
submit for your consideration some reasons personal 
to us, but in wliicli, nevertheless, as with other citi- 
zens in like circumstances, the community, we be- 
lieve, has also an interest, perhaps not altogether in- 
direct, and which are quite apart from the reasons 
usually urged against the expediency of such street 
widenings. The chief reason usually urged in 
such case is the cost. And where, as in this 
case, it is manifest that the cost must inev- 
itably be very large, with no urgent need of the 
widening nor reasonable expectation of a correspond- 
ing public benefit fr(,m it, this reason would seem to 
lie sufficient. We think, in any case of street widen- 
ing involving an appropriation of public moneys, it 
should be made to appear affirmatively that the pub- 
lic safety and convenience require such widening. 
But to us, one of whom, at least, has passed many 
years in business in the immediate neighborhood, 
and all of whom are familiar with the locality, and, 
we think, competent to form an opinion of some 
value uiKiu the question, it is, on the contrary, ap- 
parent, in this case, that no such want of safety or 
convenience exists. It is not true that travel is ever 
obstructed, unless, indeed, it be in some quite ex- 
traordinary circumstances, in this part of Water 
street. Nor do we believe it is likely_ to be so ob- 
structed in many years to come as seriously to im- 
pede travel. Our building was a costly one, yet it 
cost much less when built, a few years ago, than a 
like building would cost at the present tmic. It 
is occupied in part by ourselves. Other parts 
arc let to tenants, some of whom are entitled 
to hold for a term of years yet to come. The build- 
ing was fitted and furnished witli especial reference 
to our business. It has machinery and other costly 
llxtures and implements suited to our work and busi- 
ness. To cut off the building proposed wouM destroy 
it for our purpose. We should be obliged to remove 
from it when the cutting is begun; and when it is 
ended and the building repaired, it will be too small 
for and uusuited to our use. The machinery, fixt- 
ures and implements, so adapted to the building as 
it now is, would then lie of little value. Meanwliile 
the pulilication of our paper cannot be stopped. We 
must seek out somewhere, somehow, as best we 
may, another place. Our tenants' leases are not de- 
stroyed by the cutting. They have rights which we 
cannot Impair or cliange. Meanwhile, we may find 
ourselves, against our will and inclination, involved 
with the city and our tenants in a lawsuit, in 
which each will occupy and maintain, as best he 
may, at no little expense, one side of the triangle, 
witli the certainty on our part that we cannot he 
compensated. Altogether, such a complication is not 
pleasitnt to contemplate. We are aware that the an- 
swer to all this ordinarily is, "But the city must pai/ 
you." But this is the answer of the ill-informed or 
the unrefiecting only. Now the value of our building 
as it is to us is a very different thing from its market 
value. We did not build it to put on the market; nor 
altogether nor chiefly as an invc^stment; but we de- 
signed it especially to meet our own wants, and fitted 
it. to that end and purpose. We would not sell it for 
wdiat would be deemed by others to be a reasonable 
price. To occupy it, as it is, is of the first importance 
to us. Such, sketched in hurried outline, are our rea- 
sons for this earnest remonstrance. We are not 
stranj^ers to the public. Indeed, we arc nearly relat- 
ed to it. It is not capricious. It is not inchned to 
mischief or wrong. We know its wants in this case; 
and we know, too, that while it is fairly represented 
it will not tear down our building under a false pre- 
tence. Beals, Greene & Co, 

IlEARINCiS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The hearings on orders of notice on petition of 
IJenjamin I'.andall, for leave to jilacea steam engine 
and boiler on lot 1:3 Chelsea street, and on ])etit.ion of 
J. J. Birkmaier & Co., for leave to place a steam en- 
gine and boiler in building formerly 11 South street, 
were sfwtn-ally tak(^n up. A renionstrauce was pre- 
sented fi'om C. Sell waar and others against the peti- 
tion of Benjamin Kandall. Thc^ reiiorts were recom- 
mitted, accoiniianied by the remonstrance. 

UNF-INISIIED imSINESS. 

The following orders were severally read a second 
time and pass(Hl: 

Order to revoke location, granted by the cily of 
Koxbiiry to the Metropolitan Railroad Comjiany. for 
tracks in Walnut avenue. 

Order to extend t he name of Foundry strec^t lo 
the extension of said street as fai ns Doii-liester ave- 
nue, near Sixth street. 



102 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



Order to terminate rent of armory of Co. A, Nintli 
Infantry, in Hanover street on March 1, ISTo. 

Order to pay H. H. Hunnewell $5()21, for land dam- 
ages on Devonshire street. 

Order to pay C. Stetson and S. Atlierton $2577, for 
Purcliase-strect land damages. 

Oi'der to pay John Foster $3875, for Bedford-street 
land damages. 

Order to pay J. Henry Sears $780 !)0, for Cottage- 
street land damages. 

PAPERS FUOM TUB COMMON COUNCIL. 

Tlie petitions of -loliu Lynch and of Edward Bry- 
ant were referred, in concurrence. 

Tlie I'ollowiug reports were accepted, in concur- 
rence: 

Reports (leave to withdraw) on petilions of 

1. Lydia A. Edgccomh, for neglect of city to re- 
move a smallpox patient from her boarding house. 

2. Mary J. Melclior, for being conveyed to small- 
pox hospital .from Massachusetts General Hospital, 
she not having tlic smallpox. 

3. Philip McDoiHiugii. for injuries to his son by 
explosion of lireworlvs in July, ]!!l72, 

4. William Whittaker, to lie jiaid for injuries to his 
son by discharge of fireworks in July, 1S72. 

5. M. C. Murray, to b(? i)Mid for damages to his 
property from an alleged defect in TremonI, street. 

The auditor's eslinuites for year 1873-1S7I (('ity 
Doc. No. 'i-i), were referred, in concurrence, Alderman 
Gibson, Sayward, Brown, Power and Clark being 
.joined to the committee. 

The following orders were passed, in concurrence: 

Order to locate a steam fire engine and apparatus 
in house of Chester Hose C'omi)any, on Northampton 
street. 

Order to release to Samuel B. Pierce 8880 square feet 
of land on Forest-11 ills avenue in exchange for 8;W0, 
to be ('onveyed to the city by said Pierce I'or the pur- 
poses of a street. 

Order lo allow Winchester & Hight to erect a 
wooth'u building on Dorcliester avenue and Foundry 
street beyond the legal liniils. 

Order to allow I'. C^ampbell »fe Son to erect a wood- 
en biulding on Reed street beyond (he Icgnl limits. 

Orders to take the estate of M. H. (Jlceson on Sum- 
mer and High streets, which \u' i'elin(|uished to ihe 
city. Also to sell such portion as will not be needed 
for .streets. 

KLECTrON OF FIRST- ASSIST ANT-.\SSESS0R. 

The election of Artemas It. Holden as Kirst-Assist- 
ant-Assessor in ]>lace of James Dennie, chosen by 
this Board, came n]\ when the Board ])receeded to 
an election, with the following result: 

Whole II II in her of votes 12 

NeeessMry (i> a choice 7 

.J miles Deiiiiie 1(1 

Arleiiiiis II, Holilen 1 

'I'lieiiiiliiliis ISiirr 1 

Mr. Denuie was again declared to be elected, in non- 
concurrence. 

SECOND-ASSIST ANT-ASSESSOl:s. 

The election of J. J. Hughes of Ward 5, Edward 
Kelley of Ward 15, and Oliver Hall of Ward Ki, as 
Second-Assisfnut-.\ssessors, in the [ilaces of .). J. 
Gallivan, B. \<\ S. Bullard and George W. Conant, 
chosen liy this Board, came up, when the Board pro- 
ceeded (o a ballot, resulting as follows: 

Whole miinher of votes V2 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Ward Five. 

J. J. Gallivan 8 

John JJiiiiiielly 3 

Wnihini M. Flanders 1 

W<(ril I'Vflci'ii. 

B. F. S. Bullard '. 7 

Edward Kelley 5 

\V((r(l Slrlcfii. 

Georiie W. Conant tO 

Oliver Hall ;J 

Messrs. Galliv.an, Bullar<l and Conant were declared 
to he again eleeled, in non-concurrence. 

UISI'ORTS or COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Pow er, from the Committee on Steam 
Engines, reported in favor of granting the petition 
of Joseph Watson, for leave to locate and use a 
steam boiler and engine at 137 Portland street. Ac- 
cepted. 

Alderman Say ward, from the Committee on Health, 
reported in favor of petitions for stabh-s as follows: 

Henry Fagen, to occupy a wooden stable for six 
horses on K, near First street; Samuel S. Kenney, to 
occupy a stable for two horses on Saratoga street, 
corner of Pulii;im street: Asa P. Potter, to'occupy a 
brick stable fur eight, horses cm Way street. No. :^1 ; 
George H. Horner, to occupy a wooden stable for one 
horse on Gold street, rear ;!(i7 Fourth street. Sever- 
ally accepted: 

Alderman Clark, from the Committee on Streets. 
reported leave to withdraw on petition of Lewis W. 
Spaulding to be iiaid for damages for land taken for 
Fifth street, between G and H streets. Accepted. 



Alderman Sayward, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of licenses, as follows: 
Mario C. Ladrcyt, to give a concert at Trcniont Tem- 
ple, March 12, in aid of the disabled firemen; R. A. 
Brannon, to exhibit a panorama of Ireland at East 
and South Bostini, March 11 and 13; Edward (J. Ken- 
dall, to exhibit a billiard match at Bnmstead Hall, 
March 11; George Ellis, to give a series of lectures, 
concerts, etc., at Stoughton-street Baptist Church; 
John O'Brien, to give a concert at Lyceum Hall, 
Ward ]«, Mai'ch 10, and lecture March 17; J. M. Bel- 
lew, to give i)ublic readings at Music Hall; Martin F. 
Corley, to give a concert at South Boston, March 17; 
also to seventeen newsboys and one bootblack; to 
Nathan M. Hatch, as an auctioneer; and to sundry 
pei'sons to kee]) intelligence offices, victuallers, wagon 
stand, transfer of wagon license. Severally accepted. 

Leave to withdr.aw was reported on i)i'tition of 
Charles C Barry, for license as a victualler. Ac- 
cepted. 

Alderman Cutter, from the Committee on the Fire 
DepariiniMit, on the piu't of the P.oard of Aldermen, 
to whom was referred the petitiim of John IL Kelly 
and others, asking thai Daniel Crockett be confirmed 
as foreman of Hook it Ladder Company No. 1, made 
a report recommending that the petitioners have leave 
to withdraw. Accepted. 

Alderman Cuttei-, from the Commmittee on the 
Fire Department, made a report that the authority 
on the part, of the I'ity Council to aitpropriate money 
for the relief (if firemen disabled in the service of the 
city, and for Ihe icliet ot'llie families of such firemen 
as liave been killed in the i)ei-foriii:ince of their du- 
ties, is limited to the sum of $1(1110 jier annum. The 
•act giving t his authority was jiassed in 18.VI, when the 
city was much smnller than it is at present, and it is 
Jiroper tluit Ihe .■miouiit should now b(t increased. A 
coinninnieation on the subject from the Chief-Engi- 
neer is appended hereto. The eonnnitlee would re- 
sijeetrully recommend the passagi' of the accompany- 
ing order: 

Ordered, That the Ccmimitteo on Legislative Mat- 
ters be reijuested to apiiear before the proiii'r com- 
mittees of the (ieneial Court now in session, and urge 
the passage of an act iinthorizing the (.'ity Council of 
Boston to e\|iend a sum not exceeding $:!il(l(l iinnuallv 
for (he relief of such tirenien as liav<' been disabled 
in the service of t\w city, and for the relief of the 
families of such firemen as havis lieen killed in the 
lieiformance of their duties. 

The report was accepted, and the order was passed. 

Al(lerin;in Cutter, from the (Vmimittee on Paving, 
who were directed t(i report a series of rules to gov- 
ern the persons authorized under section II of tlie 
Ordiriiince on Streets to siiriiikle the streets of this 
city, made a report rec(nnniendiiig the adoption Of 
the follinving rules: 

1. All ;i|ipiieations for watering the streets of the 
city sIimII Iks referred to the Committee on Paving. 

3. The expense of watering (he streets shall be 
borne in mII cases by the abutters, unless otherwise 
ordered liy the Boaid of Aldermen. 

:l 'I'he mode of watering the streets and the kind 
and ipiaiilily of water to lie put upon tlH> strc^ets dur- 
iiigeMcli d;iy shall be determined by (he Su|)erintend- 
ent of Streets. 

4. Till' license shall be for the term of one year 
only and shall be liable to be revoked at the pleasure 
of the P.oard of Aldermen. 

5. I'lie lime of eommeneing and finishing the duty 
of watering the streets to be determined bythe'Su- 
perinteiideni of Streets. 

0. Ill watering the streets, special care must be 
takcai to avoid wetting the crossing stones. 
The rejiort was acceiit.ed, and the onhsr was passe'd. 

WElflHEIIS AND INSPECTORS OP LKillTERS. 

Alderman Sayward, from the Joint Siiecial Com- 
mittee to nominate candidates for Weighers and In- 
spectors (d' Ballast l.i'ghters, made a report nominat- 
ing for liispeclor-iii-(iiief Kdward Hatch, and for 
Assistant-Inspectors John Kenny, George Faulkner, 
Abijah U. Tew ksbury. 

The report was accispted, and the Board proceeded 
to an election, wdien Messrs. Hatch, Kenny and Faulk- 
ner were chosen by an uuaiiiinoiis vote. Mr. Tewks- 
bury had 11, and P. J. McDeiinott 1 vole. The sev- 
eral nominees of the committee were declared to be 
elected. 

DIRECTORS OF PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS. 

Alderman Gaffield, from the Joint Special Commit- 
tee appointed to iioiniiiate suitidde candidates for Di- 
rectors of Public Institutions to till vacancies occur- 
I'iiig on the tii'st Monday in May next, made a report 
recominendimr the elect itm of Bradh'y N. Cumings. 
Albert J. 'W'riglit and Moses W. PichardsoH. 

Mr. Prescott of the committee dissented, and rec- 
oinmeiided the election of S.'iinnel Little to fill one of 
the \acancies. 

The Board proceeded to an election, with the fol- 
lowing result: 



MAnon 10 



187 3 



103 



Whole numhovof votes 12 

NpocSHsivy to a olioipo 'T- 

Uradlcy N. Cuiiiings 11 

.1. I'ntiuuii Bnulk'e il 

Sainiiol Little » 

AllH'it .1. WviKlit 4 

Woses W. liicliardsun 3 

Messrs. Cninings, Bradlcc and Little were declurcd 
to be elected. 

TRUSTEES OF PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Alderman Bigelow, from the Joint Special Com- 
mittee, appointed to nominate snitablo candidates 
for Trnstees of tlie Public Library, to liU tlu^ vacan- 
cies occurring on the first Monday in May next, made 
a report recommending the election of Sanmel A. 
Green and Daniel S. Curtis. The report was accept- 
ed, and the Board proceeded to an election, with the 
following result: 

Whole number of votes U 

Necessary to a choice , 7 

Daniel S. Curtis 11 

Sanmel A. Green 'T 

C. Levi WooiUniry II 

Messrs. Curtis and Green were declared to be elected. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman Clark — 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be anlliorized, 
with the approval of the Committee on Claims, to 
draw upon the Treasnrer for the payment of all e.\e 
cntionsor judgments of conrt against I he city, when 
properly certified as correct by the City Solicitor. 

Ordered, That the Board establish the revised 
grades of Federal, Franklin and Channing si reels 
and Leather square, as shown on a i>lan drawn by 
the City Surveyor, dated Feb. 21, 1873, and deposited 
in the olHce of said City Surveyor. 

Orden-d, That there bo paid to the Baptist Mission 
and Union the sum of $384.5, Tor land taken and all 
damages occasioned by ilie .videning of Bedford 
street, by a resolve and order of the Board of Streel 
Commissioners, January 23, 1873, upon the usual 
conditions; to be charged to the appropriation for 
Widening Streets. 

Ordered, That there be paid to Caroline A. Sumner 
the sum of $23% for land taken in the name of Mrs. 
J. II. Sumner, and all damages occasioned by the 
widening of Stoughton street, by a resolve and order 
of the Street Commissioners, September 1, 1871, upon 
the usual conditions; to be charged to the apjjtopria- 
tion for Widening Dudley and Other SI reels. 

Ordered, That th(n-e be paid to I be heirs of John 
Osboru tlu' sum of $11(74 40, for land taken and all 
damages occasi<med by the widening aiul extension 
of Emerson street, by a resolve and order of the 
Street Connnissioners, April 20, 1872, upon the usual 
conditions; to be charged to the appropriation for 
Widening Streets. 

Ordered, That there be paid to the heirs of Tas- 
ker II. Swett the sum of $11,000, for land taken and all 
damages occasioned by the widening of Washington 
street, by a resolve and order of the Street Comhiis- 
sioners, December l(i, 1872, upon the usual conditions: 
to be charged to the Burnt-District Loan. 

Ordered, That there be paid to John B. S. Jackson 
the sum of $244."), for land taken and all damages oc- 
casioned by the widening of Pond street, by a resolve 
and order of the Street Commissioners, Dec. 31, 1872, 
upon the usual conditions; to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for Widening Streets. 

An or.'ler, giving notice to the heirs of Ann G. 
Frothinghaiu, John Poster, Sidney B. Morse, the 
Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association, C. 
B. Wilson, J. T. Eldridge, the heirs of Joshua Ben-, 
nett, heirs of Peter lien ton, the Baptist Mission and 
Union, and Anthony S. Jones, and all others inl crest 
ed, to remove ail obstructions over the ))roiiosed line 
of widening of Bedford street, on or before the l.Mh 
of April next ensuing. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins — 

Ordered, That the sum of $7(i() 18 be and hereby is 
appropriated to pay for the repairing of a lire-reser- 
voir on the corner of Warren and VVashington si reels 
in the Highland District; the same to be cbarg(Hl to 
the appropriation for the Fire Department. 

Oidered, That the sum of $1300 be and hereby is 
appropriated, in addition to the amount lieretofoi-e 
appropriated, for the Chief Engineer of tlie^Fire De 
partment, under the direction of the committee, to 
em])loy during the remainder of the llnancial year, 
such ad(liti(mal assistance in the dei)artnient as may 
be deemed necessary; the same to be charged to the 
appropriation for the Fire Department. 

ANNKXATION OP BROOKLINE. 

Aldermany (^nincy otfered the following order: 
Ordered, That the Committee on Legislative Mat- 
ters be instructed that in the; oiiimon of the City 
Council no opposition or hinderance should be ottered 
on the part of the City Government to petitions by 
inhabitants of the town of Brookliiie to the(ieiieral 
Court in favor of annexation. 
Alderman Quiucy, m explanation of the above 



order, stated that its design was to obtain a discus- 
sion for the purpose of ascertaining tire attitude of 
the city in relation to the annexation of Brooklimc. 
Several days ago, when tlie (luestiou first came up 
before the legislative committee, as a member of the 
Committee on Legislative Matters he stated as the 
attitude of the city tliat no action should be taken 
until the report of the commissioners on tlie sub.iect 
of the annexation of Charlcstown and other places 
sliould be made, and as there was no exigency for 
action at tlie present time it would be better to have 
the matter go over. 

This course had l)een viewed by some of the friends 
of annexation in Brookliiie as in tlie nature of oppo- 
sition. The design of the order was to show that 
while not directly in favor, the city did not oppose 
the application of the citizens of Brookliiie, and that 
there should be no delay or hinderance by the action 
of the city. If the order should be passed, he would 
withdraw the objection made by him, and state the po- 
sition of the city to be in accordance with the order not 
to hinder or oppose any action \\hich may be taken. 

Alderman Ilulbert said he did not understand the 
purport of the order, that they represented the atti- 
1 ude of the city as set forth. 

Alderman Power said he understood the committee 
rei)resented the views and interests of tlie cit,y in 
such matters. Before the annexation of Brookline 
should be favored by him, he wished to know the 
amount of the debt of the town, if any, for he was 
not in favor of annexing towns with large debts to 
be paid by the city. His impression, however, was 
that Brookline stood well pecuniarly, and he wislied 
to be informed on that point by the committee. 

Alderman Clark stated that he did not understand 
that the order committed the city one way or the 
other; but as the chairman of the committee did say 
before the legi.slative committee that the subject might 
perhaps as well lie over to another year, and as the 
citizens of Brookline had obtained "a hearing, they 
were astonislied at the supposed position of the city. 
The committee of last year were in favor of annexa- 
tion, that it was. desirable for several reasons. 

On the proposition of the city of Charlcstown for 
annexation a cominissi<in had been appointed; Som- 
erville.had exprcsscil lavor for annexation and he had 
an impression that West Roxbury had also,— all of 
which was under consideration of the commission: 
but as the town of Brookline is before the Legislat- 
ure, and if a majority of the voters declare in favor 
of annexation, it is desirable that the order should 
be passed, simply requesting the committee not to 
oppose it. He did not understand the committee 
were to advocate it, b.it at a proper time he should 
advocate it. Brookline had a valuation of $2(1,000,- 
000 or $:W,000,000, a debt of half a million and town 
property worth a million of dollars, and financially 
was all right. But that was not the question ; and if 
the people of Brookline favor annexation the city 
should not oppose it. 

Alderman (^uincy amended the order to meet an 
objection of Alderman Hulbert, in adding the word 
"Government" after city, the word not being in the 
original drafht. He wished only, he said, to with- 
draw his objection in relation to annexation so far as 
related to Brookline, and leave it to be acted upon 
il s merits. 

Alderman Stebbins believed the original position of 
the Alderman to be a correct one, for, as he under- 
stood it, the attitude of the city was that whenever 
any city or town wished for annexation a commission 
would investigate the subjects of debt and the rea- 
sons for annexation. The exigency of Brookline he 
understood to be the want of water, and if in the 
opinion of the City Engineer, we shall lie obliged be- 
fore many years to seek other sources of sujiiily of 
water, it may be a question for consideration whether 
we can meet the supply required by annexation. 

Alderman Clark stated as the position of the ques- 
tion that it looked as though th(' ccmimiltee threw 
cold water on the subject, and opiiosed it, and the 
order was to set that right, by providing that no ob- 
jection will be made if a satisfactory arrangement is 
brought about. In case the people of Brookline ob- 
tain a bill, of which they have hopes, then a commis- 
sion would be appointed by the town to meet similar 
commissioners from the city, and make all necessary 
investigations. 

The order was passed. 

ORDERS READ ONCE. 

On motion of Alderman Clark, orders to Sampay- 
iiel SI ill-man, trustee, $1<),80.'>, for land taken to widen 
Washington street; to pay Edward Wigglesworth 
$31,175, for land taken to extend Devonshire street; 
to pay Harriet E. Joyce $1074. for land taken (m Wal- 
nut avenue. 

On motion of Aldeiniaii Power, authorizing the 
Commlltee on Printing to lake chaige of the unfin- 
ished business in relation to Ihc abstract of the 
United States census relating to this city. 



104r 



BOARD OF AL33EI1MEN. 



CITY VlIYSICilAN AND ItlS DUTIES. 

On motion of Alclei-man Clai-lv rhc ofder to cstalv 
lish the salary of tlie Ciity I'hjsician was taken from 
the ta1)le. 

Alderman Stcbhins s^ulmiitted a comnrnnication 
from the Board of Health statins the dnties of tlie 
City Physician, the communication heiiig as follows: 

Boston, March 8, 1873. 
,S'. 7/. Shlthiiifi, ('Jiairmanof CotiiinilUe on. Sdlariea: 
Bear !Sir—Y<)ui's of the 9.5th hit., askins; for a state- 
ment of wliat the duties of the City I'hysiciaii will he 
the coming year, has heen received. 

I am directed by the hoard in reply to say that 
While it would be very difficult to .state iu detail all 
the duties which will be expected of this officer, yet 
a few may be stated, a.s follows: to render all profes- 
sional services reqnircd at the f'ily Prison, police 
stations and .Tail, examine all aiijilicants for the po- 
lice, examhie bad meats, etc., at llu' market, examine 
and report upon the causes of death of all i)ersons 
dying without a physician in attendance, examine 
aiiy vessel oi- suspected cargo at the wharves of the 
city, examine all contagioiis and dang(ni)n.s diseases 
and the cause thereof, examine into the condition of 
tenenienl hiiuses, aud (examine all nuisances W^lich 
may !)<■ found in the city. 

In general terms they would like to feel that the 
entire time of Ibis ollieer is at tlu; disi)osal of the 
Board of llcallh and that they may call upon him at 
any and .-dl times t.o go where aud do what, the board 
will iu)t line time for. 

It will be impossible to have promjit action ow Hie 
part of tlie City Physician unless he; be in readiness 
at all times. \'ery respect fully, Your obedient servant, 
CiiAKi.n's 10. Davis, .Ik. , Clerk. 
Alderman Power stated Hint, sliould tlie City Physi- 
cian di'voli- allliis time to tlie oHice whicli was de- 
signed in tliec^stablishment of llu' I'.oard of lle.'ilth, 
no objection would be made to paying him a salary 
of f 300(1 a year. It was dicsigned iii the organi/.ation 
of the I'oard of Health that tli(> jiliysiciaii on the 
Hoard should perform the dutii^sof C'ity Physician. 
P.ut as lli(< duties bad been hssened, and the otlice re- 
mained sejiaratc, lie could not consent to the jiayincnl 
of an ini-re.ased salary. 

Alderman (Jatliehi read from the ordinance estab- 
lishing the P>oard of llealtl), so far as related to the 
duties of the City Physician. 

Alderman Clark wished to know befori' lixing the 
salary whether the City Physiei;iii wouhl l)e rrejuired 
to devote ;dl his time to the city. 

Alderman Sayvv'ai'd was surprised .at Hie olijeetiims 
made, for it should be enough tiial the ('ity Physician 
was under tlu; direction of the I'xiard of Health. 

Alderman Slebbins believed the salary should be 
established, as proposed, as it was expected by the 
Board of ilc.-ilth that, the City Physician would give 
his eutirt; tiuii' in the future as in the jiast. The 
City Physician, whoever he may bi;, will cheerfully 
obey all orders of the Board of Health. He thought 
there was some mistake aliout sick persons Ixung 
turned away by the t'ity Physician; but had known 
of apiilicalions (o him at unreasiuiable hours by 
those who shmdd have gime somewlu're else. 

Alderman Power said he had heard that the City 
Physician li.'id turned i)eople away who c;in e to him. 
as iiot liaving time to attend to theni, but if In; is to 
be paid as proposed he should devote .all his time to 
the interests of the city. 

"Alderman (Jilison wish(;d to know what Hie City 
Physician would have to do. 'I'here had been a, gen- 
eral vaeciniiHon by an army of physicians, enough to 
kill or cure allot the people; and as this was the 
principal business of the City Physician, which has 
been taken away, he would lik(; lo know why the 
salary was to be increased. It was s;ud be w.as ex- 
l)ected 1(1 examine ti'iiement houses; but it was un 
derstood there were nine oi' ten inspectors, whose 
duty it is to look after such houses; and if it should 
be added that he should visit , all the [lolice stations 
and had work enough to m.'dic ii)) tlie employment 
of his time, it might be some reason for the increase 
of salary. 

Alderman Stebbins staled that the ordinance 
required I h(; attendance of the ('ity I'hysieian upon 
the several station houses. 

Alderman Power said it was the exiieclal ion of the 
committee who framed the ordin.-ince that the Board 
of Health would inspect and look aftei- the tenenienl 
houses, which was one of the objecls of the eslali- 
lishuient of the board. The Hoard of ileallli called 
for an expenditure of f 100,000, which w(nild be a 
great surprise to the citizens who asked for its estab- 
lishment, and should it go on in this way. (here 
wouldbenca.il for its abolition, lie would move a 
reference of (he order to a special conimiHee tore- 
port upon (he duties of Hie City Physician. 

Alderman Chirk mo\(;d to amend by adding in 
conneetioi) with the salary, a provisi(m i.liat tin; (.-'ity 
Pliysiciau sliall devote his time to the serviee of the 
city. . '■■ ■■'■' ' 



Alderman Sayward read from section ninelecn of 
the ordinance relating to the duties of the City Physi- 
cian, in looking after all cases of disease ' (u' danger 
to the public health, and hi giving his advice at all 
times, as sutHcient to satisfy "imy reasonable man as 
to the amount of service required of liini. 
The mot ion of Alderman I'ower was' lost— 5 to (i. 
The question recurred u))on the amendin(>nt of 
Alderman Clark, that the City Physician shall' liot 
actively engage in any other business exceiit such as is 
designated'by the Board of Health or City Council. 

Aldennan Wayward objected (hat if the City Physi- 
cian did not perform his duties, the Board of Health 
could at any moment remove him andn<)nn>ia(e some 
other man. If it was aimed at the present City 
Physician, he could nol say wlieHier or hot there was 
grimnd for it, bnt he would remind those who were 
in favor of the new Board of Health, th.at it was said 
no one would lie willing to take a place on the Board 
of IleaK h for $4000 a year. 

Alderman Clark framed his amendment to read "de- 
vole his timi; exclusively to the interests of the (;ity." 
vMdermau Power impiired how they were to know 
that he gives his whole tinu; to tlie city A compc- 
tt'iit man and an honorabh; man would hold to an 
agreemi'iit if he made one, but he would like to pee 
tin; agreement. ' ' . ' '.'•'.. 

Alderman Sayward urged Vhsit i'f.'life'''wisfied' the 
City Physician to give his whole time, wh.y did not 
(he genlleman say so when he framed the oidin.-incey 
Alderman Power re[ilie(l that he did not frame; the 
whole ordinance, and some of the most important 
things were struck out, while; others they could not 
agree upon. If he h.'id had his way the duties woiild 
have bei'ii eh'lined more clearly. 

Alderman Cilison did not think the salary would be 
(oei mue'h if tin; I'liysieian had enough to'do; liilt as 
the whole' dutie'S of the' otlice had been deme' here'to- 
fore- fe>r ;fr,l.'')00 a year, he could not see' how the' salary 
shoulil be double when there is neithing to dei. If t,li(;y 
could save lillMlO why should th(;y double' the siilary'? 
Alelerm.'in Sayward said if it was theii'di.ty to'save, 
tlie'ii they should abolish Hie I'.oard e)f Ile.'ill'h. 

Ahle-rm.'iii (iibson believe'd the'y she)uhl dei so, and 
by so deling tli. y might save $S(),0(1(). The business 
couht be done well enough by the Board of Health, 
as formerly. The chairman of the board last year 
was at. the' head eif more' committees than hi' could 
slioulde'r, .■inel e'onse'que'iitly could not give; the atten- 
tion 111 he'alth malti'rs wlii(;h was re'qiiired. With 
less eif such respenisibilKie'S on the chairman, he 
would gu.'iraiite'e' that the business would be done 
well eimugb in the' future by the' Board of Aldernien. 
Aldennan Sayward referri'd lo the arguuu'ut in 
favor of Ilieiu'W Board of Health, that the pe'ople 
deinande'd it, and now it is objected lo paying the 
ii'ces.'^ary salaries. 

Alderman Power did not think there was any quefs- 
(ioii thai the e-itizeiis demanded the establishmi'iit of 
a, ni'w ISoarel e)f Health, nor dienie doubt that it weaild 
be be'ne'll(;ial. Yet the'y mjgbl gel. up the' expense; to 
be so enormous that the cilize'iis would di'Uianel that 
it be; aheilished. It was tlie'ir elnty (o leieik close'ly af- 
ter the' ee-onemiical manageme'iit of the board. He 
would move a ri'considei'alion of tlu; vote re'jei'ting 
his motion, believing that it would be best to have a 
commitle'e' re'port upein Hie subje'ct. ■ ,, 

Alde'i-maii Clark suggested that tiiey, sfiQulcl, go info 
cominitte;e' of Hie' whole; and ha\'e a '(;on'fL'rence' with 
Hu' lUiard of He'alth in relation to what tlie-y prei- 
pose'd to do. IK' diel not be'lieve' thai all eif the' mem- 
bers of this I'.oard had inle'rested themselves enough 
to know what the' I'.oard of Ileallh are doing or pio- 
pose; to do. The I'.oard of Health, he believed, would 
be; a good t hing, but it may be e'xpeiisive. 

Alele'rman Saywai'il could not understand how the 
Jie'eiple sheiiilel elemand a Hoard eif Ik'alHi, be'e-anse the' 
Board of McU'rine'ii as a Heiaril eif lleallli did (lot 
kneiw anything, \et the'y are e'xpected t.o leieik after 
the; P.eiard of Health to see; if (hey properly dischai'ge 
their dntie'S. ,.,'','. i, ' 

AhU'iuian l'ei\ve;r did iieit believe it t'o .'lie'sfj-ahge 
Hia( the' people' di'inauded (he est^iblishment of a 
P.oarel of He'alHi, and it was their duly to see that 
there' sheiiild be no unnecessary expense attending 
it. He' be'lieve'd the questieui e'eiuld be Settlett to tjie 
sat.isfac(.iem of the Board of Health. ' ^ ' ' 

The- epieslion was stated to be on the amendment of 
Alde'inian Clark. ''' ' 

Alde'imau Sayward moved as an amendment, that 
all the' elutie's iiVe'sciibe'd in the' ordinance. tp be done 
by the City Physician be' stricken out. 
The Chair ruled the' amendment to be not in order. 
Alderman Clark withdrew his aniendinenl, and 
moved (hilt Hk' orde'r be laid on the table, which was. 
carrii'd. '■ 

A fnrdiei meilion was inaele' by him and carried,' to 
hold an informal me'eling with the Board of He'altli 
on Tuesday .'d <ine o'elock in i-e'lalion to the election 
of the City Physician. 
Adjotiri'ied. 



105 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BO STON. 

Proceedings of the Common Oouncil, 

MARCH 13, 1873. 

The regular weekly meeting of the Common Coun- 
cil wus lield this evening at 7^ o'clock, E. O. Shep- 
erd, the president, in tlie chair. 

On motion ol' Mi-. Caton of Ward 11, the roll was 
(sailed, when a quorum of members appeared to he 
present, as follows: 

Adams, Andei-son, Barnes, Blackuiar, Bleiler, Board- 
man, Bowles, Braekett, Brennan, Burditl,,Burt, Caton, 
Collins, Cndworth, Darrow, Dean, '1\ H. Doherty, Ed- 
wards, Flatley, Flynn, Hall, Harrington, Hiue, 
Flolmes, Jones, Kelley, King.sley, Lamb, Malian, Mars- 
ton, Martin, McCue, McKenney, Morse, Page, Picker- 
ing, Prescott, Kisteen, Shaw, Thacher, Tower, Train, 
Upham, Warren, Wells, West, Weston, Whiston, 
Woods, Woodward. 

PAPBliS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The petitions of Ben.ia,min Franklin, Sister Mary 
Elizabeth and another, a)id of W. L. Lathrop, were 
referred in concurrence. The remonstrance of 
Beals, (ireene & Company was referred to the Com- 
mittee on Stri'ets. 

The following orders were severally read once: 

Order an I horizing the mayor, with the approval of 
the Committee on Claims, io draw upon the tieasurer 
for the payment of all executions or .judgments of 
court against the city when properly certified by the 
City Solicitor. 

Order that $7(1(1 IK be apiii-oi)riated to pay for re- 
pairing llie i'nv ri'sctvoiron the corner oi' Warren 
and Washington streets, in the Highland District. 

Oi'der thai an addition of .f l:!0() be ai)pr<)priated for 
the eni])loynient of such addilional assistants in the 
Fire De))ai'lnuMit as may be deemed necessary. 

The following orders were passed, in concurrence: 

I'epoi-t ami order re(inesting Committee im Legis- 
l«tiv<' Matters to ajiliear bel'ore the proper committee 
of the (i<'neral Court, in I'avor of an act authorizing 
the City Council to expend iK)t exceeding f.'idOO an- 
nually for the relief of lireinen disabled in the city 
service, and for the relief of the families of such lire- 
men as may be killed in the iierformance of their du- 
ties. 

Order that the oider of the 12th of Ai)ril last, mak- 
ing an allowance of .f-100 foi' rent of armory occupied 
by Company A, Ninth Regiment, M. V. M., be 
rescinded; said allowance to cease on the 1st of 
March, im?,. 

The report nominating for Weighers and Inspect- 
ors of Lighters and other vessels — Inspector-in- 
Chief — Edward Hatch ; Assistant-Inspectors— John 
Kenney, Geoi'ge Faulkner and Abi.iah R. Tewkesbury 
— coming n|) — 

Mr. Anderson of Ward :i nu)ved that the report be 
recommitted. In answer to a question of Mr. Per- 
kins of Ward (i for a reason for the motion, he stated 
that Mr. Tewkesbury desired an investigation, and 
he was in favor of giving it to him. 

The motion was ca-ried. 

FIEST-ASSISTANT-ASSESSOR. 

The certilicate of the election of James Dennie as 
a First-Assistant-Assessor in place of .\. R. Holden. 
chosen by this Council, was read, when the Council 
proceeded to a ballot, which resulted as follows: 

Whole number of votes 59 

Necessary to a choice :30 

Arteuia's I!. Holden :3(j 

Jaiiies Dennie Vi 

H. N. Holhrook 4 

James K. ('rowley 4 

Theophilus Burr 2 

Mr. Holden was again declared to be elected, in 
nou-concnrreuce. 

DIR]5CTORS OF PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS. 

The report nominating as Directors for Public In- 
stitutions, Bradley N. Cumiisgs, Albert J. Wright and 
Moses W. Richardson, with a minority report rec- 
ommending the election of Samuel Little as one of 
said Directx)rs, was accepted, in concurrence, and the 
certiticate of election of J. Putnam Biadlee, Bradley 
N, Cuminu's and Sanniel Ijittle as such directors was 
read, when the Council proceeded to an election, 
under suspension of the rules. The result of the bal- 
lot was as follows: 

Whole number of votes 61 

Necessary to a choice 31 

J. Putnam Bradlee 40 

Bi'adley N. Cumings 33 

Samuel Little 36 

Albert J. Wright 35 

Moses W . Richardsou , 3 

Samuel Talbot, Jr 14 

H. D. Bradt 8 

Benjamin James 2 



James neunie 1 

George \i. Lcaruard 1 

Dani<'IS. ('urtis 1 

S. S. liaukhi 1 

Ezra H. Baker 1 

Messrs. Bradlee and Little were declared to be 
elected in coucurreuce, and Mr. Wright in non-con- 
currence. 

SECOND-ASSISTANT-ASSESSORS. 

The certificate of the election of John J. Gallivan, 
B. P. S. Bullard and George W. Conant, as Second 
Assistant-Assessors, in place of Messrs. lUigiies, Kel 
ley and Hall, chosen by the Council, was read, when 
the C!ouncil proceeded to an election, the result of 
which was as follows: 

Whole number of votes 60 

Necessary to a choice 31 

WARD FIVE. 

James J. Hughes 5 

Jotiii J. tralliviMi 44 

K. A. (Jalhraith 5 

.John Donnelley 5 

WARD PTPTEEN. 

Edward Kelley 41 

B. F. S. Bullard 18 

WARD SIXTEEN. 

Oliver Hall 23 

George W. (Jonant 37 

Messrs. Gallivan and Conant were declared to be 
elected in concurrence, and Mr. Kelley in nonconcur 
rence. 

TRUSTEES op THE I'UBUO LIBRARY. 

The rej)ort nominating Samuel A. Green and Uan 
iel S. Curtis as Trustees of the Public Librai'y was 
accepted in concurrence, and the cei'titicate of the 
election of such i)ersons as said trustees was read, 
when the ('(Uincil pioceeded to an election, under 
suspension of (he rules, the result of which was as, 
follows: 

Whole iimuher of v<ites r)S< 

Necessary to a choice 30 

Samuel A. Green 39 

Daniel S. ( iurtis :35 

Charles L. Woodbury 41 

K. K. Hale 1 

Mr. Green was declared to be el(K'ted in concur- 
reiu'e, anil Mr. Woodberry in non-concurrence. 

The order lliat the Connnitli'e on Legislative Mat- 
ters be inslrucled that, in the opinion of liie City 
(^'ouncil, no opposition should be ottered on the pari 
of the t'ity Government